History - CPS (HST)

HST 1100. History of the World 1: Prehistory to the Renaissance. 3 Hours.

Examines the key factors and events that shaped world history from its earliest recordings to the age of the Renaissance. Analyzes history from a thematic and geographic perspective, examining the major moments in the ancient, medieval, and early modern periods. Studies how these periods in history led to the modern era.

HST 1150. History of the World 2: From Renaissance to the Present. 3 Hours.

Examines the key factors and events that shaped world history from the Renaissance to the present. Analyzes history from a thematic and geographic perspective, examining the major moments in history since the Renaissance. Offers students an opportunity to learn how major periods in history, including the Age of Revolution, the Enlightenment, and the Age of Industrialization, led to the world we live in today.

HST 1200. American History 1: Precontact to the Civil War. 3 Hours.

Examines American history from the precolonial period up to the end of the American Civil War. From the time of the earliest settlers through the Civil War, religious, ethnic, racial, and cultural differences were important factors in the development of the U.S. as a pluralistic democracy. The important role played by these many differences are explored as students analyze history from social, cultural, and political perspectives and examine key moments and turning points in American history.

HST 1250. American History 2: Reconstruction to the Present. 3 Hours.

Examines American history from the start of Reconstruction up to the present. Analyzes history from social, cultural, and political perspectives and examines key moments and turning points in U.S. history. Explores the important role played by religious, ethnic, racial, and cultural differences in shaping the continuing evolution of the United States.

HST 1990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions. May be repeated without limit.

HST 2125. 20th-Century World Wars. 3 Hours.

Examines the major causes, events, and outcomes of World War I and World War II. Analyzes the period of history prior to World War I to discover the causes of the Great War and then studies the end of the war and the events of the interwar period as a pretext for World War II. Offers students an opportunity to learn how the events of history from 1914–1945 shaped the world we live in today.

HST 2150. The World Since 1945. 3 Hours.

Examines major historical events since 1945. Analyzes the political, social, cultural, and economic relationship between the developed and developing world as a backdrop for major moments in history since the end of World War II. Major topics include the end of World War II, the Cold War, decolonization, the fall of the Soviet Union, the Middle East, and the role of nationalism and globalization in recent historical events. Emphasizes the role of difference—ethnic, racial, gender, religious, etc.—in determining the geopolitical reality.

HST 2425. Coming to America: The American Immigrant Experience. 3 Hours.

Examines the migration of people to North America. Analyzes the migration of Native Americans in ancient times, the arrival of European settlers and explorers, and the various waves of immigration to the United States from Europe, Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Emphasizes the diverse cultures that came, their reasons for coming, their reasons for settling in particular places, and the processes by which they resolved issues relating to “Americanization.”.

HST 2450. History of International Sport. 3 Hours.

Examines the history of international sports from their earliest beginnings in Ancient History up through the Modern Olympics, the World Cup, and other major international sporting events. Topics include the political and cultural origins of sports domestically and internationally, the ancient Olympics, the Modern Olympic movement, and the role of sports in international politics during and after the cold war. Studies major issues in modern sports history, including amateurism, doping, gender equality, and governance. Analyzes the role of international sports in intercultural communication and international politics.

HST 2990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions. May be repeated without limit.

HST 3990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions. May be repeated without limit.

HST 4400. Senior Seminar/Project. 3 Hours.

Offers history majors an opportunity to integrate knowledge and abilities gained throughout the program. This capstone course concludes with a detailed research project.

HST 4896. Experiential Education Directed Study. 1-4 Hours.

Draws upon the student’s approved experiential activity and integrates it with study in the academic major.

HST 4950. Seminar. 1-4 Hours.

Offers an in-depth study of selected topics.

HST 4955. Project. 1-4 Hours.

Focuses on in-depth project in which a student conducts research or produces a product related to the student’s major field. May be repeated without limit.

HST 4983. Topics. 1-4 Hours.

Covers special topics in history. May be repeated without limit.

HST 4990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions. May be repeated without limit.

HST 4991. Research. 1-4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to conduct research under faculty supervision.

HST 4992. Directed Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers independent work under the direction of members of the department on a chosen topic.

HST 4993. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to undertake special research.

HST 4994. Internship. 1-4 Hours.

Provides students with an opportunity for internship work.

HST 4995. Practicum. 1-4 Hours.

Provides eligible students with an opportunity for practical experience.

HST 5976. Directed Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers independent work under the direction of members of the department on a chosen topic.

HST 5978. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers independent work under the direction of members of the department on a chosen topic.

HST 5984. Research. 1-4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to conduct research under faculty supervision.

HST 6200. Holocaust and Human Behavior. 3 Hours.

Examines the events that led to the Holocaust, which raise profound moral questions about the consequences of one’s actions and beliefs and how we make distinctions between right and wrong, good and evil. Begins with an exploration of questions of identity in our lives today and then moves to questions of group membership in history. These sessions lay the foundation for an intensive examination of the steps that led to the Holocaust. Asks students to think about questions of judgment and memory, considering who bears responsibility for crimes against humanity and how to confront or memorialize the past. Concludes by challenging participants to reflect on questions about what it means to participate responsibly in a civil society.

HST 6210. Choices in Little Rock. 3 Hours.

Explores the 1957 desegregation of Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas. Traces the legal and personal struggles of African-Americans from Jim Crow America through the landmark Supreme Court decision on Brown v. Board of Education and, ultimately, to the courageous actions of nine young men and women determined to make desegregation a reality. Their efforts would lead to a crisis that historian Taylor Branch once described as “the most severe test of the Constitution since the Civil War.”.

HST 6501. Teaching and Learning at the Crossroads, South Africa. 4 Hours.

Examines South African primary and secondary education curriculum and pedagogy by visiting schools and classrooms to observe (and even teach) classroom instruction and compare teaching techniques and strategies with South African teachers. Explores literacy, social studies/history, mathematics, science, technology, and education policy. Students review and analyze curriculum content in their respective disciplines and are required to prepare a teaching module for a specific curriculum topic in their field connected to this journey. Students also attend briefings with the Ministry of Education to discuss South African education policy and the University of Cape Town to discuss teacher training practices. Offers students an opportunity to obtain curriculum ideas, photographs, and teaching resources useful in their classroom.

HST 6502. Contemporary Global Issues. 4 Hours.

Investigates historical events by looking at contemporary issues in Africa, the Americas, Asia, and Europe. Focuses on the peoples in these regions and their efforts to take control of these events in their communities. Considers the changing definition of communities as people seek to solve problems relating to access to adequate food, healthcare, and other of life’s necessities. Explores strategies that these populations have used to overcome unfair systems that have led to injustice, overpopulation, and political corruption.

HST 6503. We the People. 4 Hours.

Designed to encourage civic competence and engagement. Offers students an opportunity to obtain an understanding of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights and of the rights and responsibilities of citizens in a constitutional democracy.

HST 6504. Japan: World War II, Hiroshima, and the American Occupation. 4 Hours.

Offers teachers an opportunity to obtain an in-depth understanding of Japan during WWII and the U.S. occupation. These topics complement an American history or world history curriculum and are essential to appreciating historical and contemporary Japan. Explores teaching strategies, primary and secondary courses, and curriculum materials related to Japan.

HST 6505. Teaching for Historical Understanding: Engaging Students. 4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to explore some of the latest international research and best practices in the field of teaching history to diverse learners. Emphasizes how history can and should be engaging to a range of students through the rigorous exploration of rich content and creative classroom exercises.

HST 6506. Empowering Teachers for Democracy. 4 Hours.

Offers teachers and administrators an opportunity to explore, develop, and address the two areas most essential to children and the improvement of our civic democracy—the ability of our citizens to think critically and live ethically. Explores one or more of the following: critical thinking and the Socratic method, ethics and character education, Plato’s Republic, Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics, democracy-building skills, and building an ethical culture in school. .

HST 6507. Forgotten Stories: Women in History. 4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to explore multiple ways to bring women into the U.S. history and the world history classroom, to expand their knowledge base about the experiences of women and the role of gender in history, and to reconsider the ways they organize and conceptualize history. Examines various resources that are available to help teach about women and gender in history: primary sources, biographies, literature, Web sites. .

HST 6508. Seeing the Art in History. 2 Hours.

Explores resources and methods for integrating art objects into primary-source-based lessons. Offers students an opportunity to discover how to use visual materials and museum resources and methods to bring new excitement to their classrooms and to better prepare their students for standardized testing. Emphasizes helping students understand the historical process through analysis of painting, sculpture, and artifacts, in conjunction with documentary sources.

HST 6509. Teaching the Constitution. 4 Hours.

Explores “We The Students,” a secondary-level civics curriculum that focuses on Supreme Court cases dealing with education and the rights of students. Focuses on freedom of expression under the First Amendment and equal protection of the laws under the Fourteenth Amendment. Offers students an opportunity to learn effective strategies for teaching this material to secondary students and to design a teaching unit appropriate to a given class setting.

HST 6510. What Is Worth Fighting For? An Examination of Conflict in 20th-Century America. 4 Hours.

Examines the issue of conflict as it relates to America in the twentieth century, arguably one of the most contentious periods in our nation’s history. Analyzes America’s role in war, economic depression, and foreign and domestic relations in the contemporary world. Examines the changing and contrasting public sentiment in two world wars and the Vietnam conflict and juxtaposes the era of depression with our current financial crisis. Studies social conflicts around race, gender, equity, and their progressive change throughout the century. Through cutting-edge technology, film analysis, Socratic dialogue, and interdisciplinary connections, offers students an opportunity to glean strategies and methods of examining and addressing issues related to conflict both in and out of the classroom by answering the thought-provoking question: What is worth fighting for?.

HST 6513. World Religions Today. 4 Hours.

Explores four contemporary religions—Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam—in relation to common human themes with an in-depth study of nonviolence as it is expressed in these religions. Consists of lecture, presentations, discussion, and written theological reflections drawing on traditional and contemporary texts.

HST 6514. Irish History. 4 Hours.

Examines how the Irish built a coherent narrative of resistance and adaptation during their interaction with their nearest neighbor, England, from the time of the Norman invasion to the Peace Accord in Northern Ireland. Ireland’s history is one of colonialism, enslavement, transplantation, and a vibrant diaspora stretching over most of the world. Culturally, this small nation, the most western point of Europe, has maintained its tradition of music, poetry, art, and literature and has placed its stamp on the history of the world. Emphasizes the role of women in Irish society and the part they have played throughout Irish history as leaders and nurturers.

HST 6515. History Is Alive! Promoting Authenticity and Differentiation in Social Studies. 4 Hours.

Explores the multiple and varied methods of creating and implementing an engaging social studies curriculum that taps into the learning styles of all students. Introduces varied and effective strategies to engage students in the study of history through interdisciplinary connections, technology, authentic assessments, exhibitions, seminars, and current events. In addition, offers participants an opportunity to engage in the backwards design model in creating their own curriculum, utilizing a differentiated approach to teaching and learning that is designed to make history come alive in their own classrooms.

HST 6961. Internship. 1-4 Hours.

Provides students with an opportunity for internship work. May be repeated without limit.

HST 6962. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions. May be repeated without limit.

HST 6964. Co-op. 0 Hours.

Provides eligible students with an opportunity for work experience.

HST 6966. Practicum. 1-4 Hours.

Provides eligible students with an opportunity for practical experience.

HST 6970. Seminar. 1-4 Hours.

Offers an in-depth study of selected topics.

HST 6980. Capstone. 1-4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to integrate their course work, knowledge, and experiences into a capstone project.

HST 6983. Topics. 1-4 Hours.

Covers special topics in history. May be repeated without limit.

HST 6995. Project. 1-4 Hours.

Focuses on in-depth project in which a student conducts research or produces a product related to the student’s major field. May be repeated without limit.