Sociology - CPS (SOC)

SOC 1100. Introduction to Sociology. 3 Hours.

Examines the basic theoretical perspectives, research methods, and concepts of sociology, including society, culture, institutions, status and role, socialization, social groups, and the role of the individual within society.  Considers a number of specific topics to help explore these concepts, including crime, deviance, sexualities, gender, education, and the environment.

SOC 1210. Sociology of Boston. 3 Hours.

Examines Boston from the perspective of environmental development, neighborhood and intergroup relations, institutional services, and symbolic meanings. The city is a laboratory for exploring the people’s search for a lifestyle and the satisfaction of their needs. Offers students an opportunity to learn about urban sociology by using Boston as the case study. Examines the social history and historical development of contemporary Boston and analyzes selected current sociological issues.

SOC 1220. Engaging Difference and Diversity. 3 Hours.

Introduces the issue of diversity in the United States and across the globe. All humans share the same basic capacity for thinking, feeling, and social and moral reasoning. This general capacity takes specific cultural shape as each group adapts to different environments and historical situations and over time constructs a cultural tradition. Offers students an opportunity to articulate this knowledge intellectually and to apply it to everyday living and practices.

SOC 1230. Race and Ethnicity. 3 Hours.

Examines race and ethnicity as constructed differences. Explores the reasons for their existence, the power dynamics behind constructions of difference, the impact of difference on identity, and ways that visual and other presentations influence perceptions of self and others. Because human beings belong to different racial and ethnic groups, the study of these constructs is important to sociology. Explores the history of race and ethnicity and how history has influenced the study of these topics.

SOC 1990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions. May be repeated without limit.

SOC 2100. Popular Culture. 3 Hours.

Explores the significance of expressions of popular culture such as film, television, music, and literature. Examines media production, organization, technology, and audience consumption. Discusses countercultures and subcultures, moral and ethical considerations, high and low culture, independent and corporate business influences, and consumerism and consumption. Topics include the effects of popular culture on race, gender, and class. Covers the relationship between popular culture and existing socioeconomic institutions.

SOC 2200. Drugs and Society. 3 Hours.

Introduces the sociology of drugs. Examines social definitions of licit and illicit drugs, conditions of their use, and socialization into drug use. Surveys deviant drug use and the effects of social control on definitions and use of drugs. Applies the relevant sociological theories of deviance and social control.

SOC 2220. Sociology of Drinking. 3 Hours.

Explores how different groups and societies organize drinking as a social act and the consequences of that organization. Covers the cultural meaning assigned to drinking, the social elements found in all drinking situations, how members of social groups learn how to drink, the social and psychological functions of drinking, and the impact on the body as well as society. Investigates the etiology of alcoholism and the epidemiology of this licit substance.

SOC 2240. Death and Dying. 3 Hours.

Examines the treatment of death and dying, including problems faced by health-care professionals, family members, institutions, the funeral industry, and the dying themselves. Covers cross-cultural perspectives, the social distribution of mortality, the changing nature of death, and the ethical problems in determining life and death. Emphasizes abortion, suicide, and ceasing medical intervention.

SOC 2320. Family Functions and Dysfunctions. 3 Hours.

Studies the family as a social institution in several cultures. Investigates family interrelations with political, economic, and educational institutions and the changing nature of the family. Examines the physical, emotional, and sexual violence that occurs in families, emphasizing child and spouse abuse. Analyzes definitions, prevalence, causes, prevention, and treatment of specific cases of violence. Focuses primarily on social, policy, and legal issues.

SOC 2340. Gender and Work Roles. 3 Hours.

Considers the impact of the changing roles of men and women in a relational institutional context, including a combined focus on gender role performance in the workplace and traditional gender demands imposed by family structure. Examines how workplace organization contributes to social inequalities. Topics include women’s voice, the men’s movement, gender and historical analyses, education and professionalism, comparable worth, and leadership and management styles.

SOC 2350. Power, Poverty, and Social Change. 3 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to analyze uses of power in society and how change is facilitated. Evaluates sociological research and theories relating to the causes and effects of poverty and societal responses to it. Discusses theories of social equality and inequality as applied to the exercise of power and to the growth and development of social movements and group conflict. .

SOC 2990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions. May be repeated without limit.

SOC 3990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions. May be repeated without limit.

SOC 4990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions. May be repeated without limit.

SOC 4991. Research. 1-4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to conduct research under faculty supervision.

SOC 6962. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions. May be repeated without limit.