Education - CPS (EDU)

EDU 0100. Introduction to Education and Urban Schools. 4 Hours.

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EDU 0265. Doctoral Workshop. 0 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to jump-start, gain practice, and develop research and writing skills as they progress in the doctoral process. Requires advisor approval.

EDU 0650. Developing an Experiential Learning Idea. 2 Hours.

Offers students in this first experiential learning action module an opportunity to reflect and document their personal understanding, definition, and examples of experiential learning; to compare their understanding of experiential learning to different theories, literature, and examples of experiential learning; to develop their ideas for creating an experiential learning initiative in their context; and to develop a pitch for their plan, which will be presented to key stakeholders within their region for feedback.

EDU 0651. Creating an Experiential Learning Plan. 2 Hours.

Offers students in this second experiential learning action module an opportunity to apply understanding of the concepts, theories, and models of organizational change to inform the successful implementation of their experiential learning initiative; to explore how to engage educators in considering the development and pursuit of entrepreneurial activities at the national, local, and personal level, and the behaviors and conditions that support and impede their efficacy; and to develop a detailed plan and program evaluation for their experiential learning initiative.

EDU 0652. Implementing an Experiential Learning Plan. 2 Hours.

Offers students in this third experiential learning action module an opportunity to explore a number of qualitative and quantitative research methods that can be used to collect a variety of qualitative and quantitative data to inform their detailed plan and program evaluation for their experiential learning initiative; to implement their experiential learning initiative; and to engage regularly with faculty, coaches, and mentors to negotiate unforeseen obstacles and challenges.

EDU 0653. Evaluating and Sharing an Experiential Learning Plan. 2 Hours.

Offers students in this last experiential learning action module an opportunity to organize, analyze, and synthesize data collected during the implementation and answer their program evaluation questions; to disseminate their findings through the creation of a webpage of their experiential learning initiative and create an experiential learning talk; and to explore how to secure funds for future experiential learning initiatives and create plans for sustaining their experiential learning initiative and bring their experiential learning initiative to scale.

EDU 0711. Understanding Autism Spectrum Disorders. 2.4 Hours.

Explores the unique characteristics of students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), including impairments in language, social skills, sensory processing, and behavioral regulation. Offers detailed information on the current research and media trends in the following areas: diagnostic classification of autism, Asperger syndrome, Rett syndrome, childhood disintegrative disorder, and pervasive development disorder-NOS. Examines intervention strategies applicable to both regular and special education classrooms with particular emphasis on best practices and evidence-based interventions.

EDU 0791. Integrating Poetry and Drama across the Curriculum. 6.8 Hours.

Encourages participants to tap into their creativity through the medium of dramatic and poetic arts. Seeks to enable them to engage students, deepen learning, foster innovation, and make interdisciplinary connections to the curriculum and goals of state standards. Designed for teachers of all grades and disciplines. .

EDU 0792. The Critical Mind: Inspiring Interdisciplinary Thinking in American Humanities. 6.8 Hours.

Seeks to enable teachers to transform American literature and history courses or units into inclusive interdisciplinary humanities models. Using the prevailing philosophy and ideas of each historical era as a paradigm, the course examines examples of literature, history, music, art, architecture, and archetypal American heroes as depicted in classic American films. Participants are encouraged to engage in classroom discussions, breakout sessions to share new possibilities for interdisciplinary lesson plans, and activities that enhance curriculum content.

EDU 0793. Supporting Traumatized Children in the Least Restrictive Environment. 6.8 Hours.

Examines the necessary supports for children with trauma histories to become successful in school. Explores strategies for restructuring academic content, the application of therapeutic and behavioral interventions for positive supports, ways to ensure a safe school environment, and activities to build the social and interpersonal skills of traumatized children. Also reviews family dynamics and stressors related to parenting a child with trauma, along with information on accessing available supports.

EDU 0902. Using Graphic Design as a Teaching Tool for the K–12 Classroom. 6.8 Hours.

Explores how to integrate visual presentations, posters, timelines, and diagrams into classroom practice. Offers participants an opportunity to learn what it means to “think like a graphic designer.” The language of graphic design lives in the classroom. Through presentation, dialogue, hands-on work, and critique, participants explore curriculum content and practices and assess non-text-based student work. Designed to support those in nonart content areas across the disciplines, including teachers of English-language learners and special education. No technology or art skill is required.

EDU 0904. Cross-Cultural Awareness: Successful Cultural Contact in the Classroom. 6.8 Hours.

Explores the realm of culture: What are our own cultural values and assumptions? How do they affect our awareness of and interaction with people from different cultures? Discusses the role that one’s culture plays in cognitive processes, communication, decision making, and problem solving. Works toward developing a blueprint for tuning one’s skills to the cultural values of a diverse student population.

EDU 0909. Current Issues in Education. 1-4 Hours.

Explores a variety of current educational issues. Topics may include content in disciplines such as mathematics, science, English language, arts, and others. Presents and discusses pedagogy and teaching strategies. Exploration of best practices, current research, and readings are designed to supplement class discussion. Participants are expected to demonstrate their competence in this work by exploring ways to apply this new information to their classroom practice. May be repeated for up to 44 total credits.

EDU 0946. Portfolio and Panel Review. 0 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to complete a portfolio that includes work products demonstrating competencies in the Massachusetts Department of Education Professional Standards for Teachers. Students present a completed video and/or portfolio in which they demonstrate competencies.

EDU 0947. New Approaches to Pedagogy. 6.8 Hours.

Designed to support the transition of teachers from under-resourced learning communities in South Africa to a pedagogy that supports outcome-based educational goals and leadership development. Offers teachers an opportunity to explore how to create more effective learning environments, how to apply micro-skill theory to the lesson-planning process, how to engage students in critical thinking and analysis, and how to expand their skill sets in content remediation and assessment. Emphasizes the integration of technology in instruction, including the use of Smart Boards, educational software, and Internet-based resources.

EDU 0948. Curriculum Design and Planning. 6.8 Hours.

Explores practical models for planning and designing curriculum. Offers teachers an opportunity to create curriculum that aligns with their national curriculum standards. As an outcome of this course, teachers prepare a curriculum portfolio notebook.

EDU 0965. Best Practices for Serving Students with Severe Disabilities across School Settings. 6.8 Hours.

Explores some of the best practices in serving students with more complex academic and social needs, including those with physical, communication, developmental, and suspected intellectual impairments. Examines ways to increase access to high-quality academic and functional content through the use of universal and individually designed accommodations and modifications to both the explicit content as well as the embedded curriculum. Emphasizes the development of language systems, the use of aided language stimulation, and the functionality of core vocabulary. Reviews the current application of pragmatically organized dynamic displays (PODD systems), focusing on the broader implications in the future. Addresses the development of literacy and numeracy skills through the review of instructional practices, systematically layered content, and effective accommodations.

EDU 0970. Understanding and Addressing Needs of Students with Social Cognitive Deficits. 6.8 Hours.

Offers a hands-on/interactive course designed to provide participants with a basis for understanding the social and cognitive deficits in students diagnosed with high-functioning autism, pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS), Asperger syndrome, nonverbal learning disability, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), as well as the challenges these conditions present both in and out of the classroom. Analyzes social thinking as described in the work of Michelle Garcia Winner. Offers participants functional treatment strategies and an opportunity to better understand why these students react and respond the way they do. Examines available social skills assessment tools and resources designed to assist in developing and implementing social thinking curriculum. Also covers instruction in how to write individual education plan (IEP) goals and objectives.

EDU 0973. Mentoring in Action: Instructional Coaching for Educators. 6.8 Hours.

Seeks to advance effective teaching practices that enhance student learning through mentoring protocols. The instructor uses an interactive reflective approach that highlights practical strategies, readings, and research that can be adapted for all grade levels. Topics include observation and feedback techniques, quality conversations for busy educators, strategies for group mentoring, and organizing a new teacher support program. Presents a month-by-month curriculum for supporting effective teaching practices. Emphasizes conversations related to student learning. Course objectives are aligned with the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE) Guidelines. Participants also have an opportunity to learn how to implement effective mentoring protocols that retain qualified teachers. Materials are appropriate for mentor teachers, coaches, department chairs, and administrators.

EDU 0987. Using Data to Enhance Student Achievement. 6.8 Hours.

Explores how to use data more effectively. Examines ways of collecting and analyzing data. Expands common notions of data beyond grades and test scores to include more subtle forms of data such as classroom observations and environmental surveys. Educators are increasingly surrounded by data. However, studying educational data does not automatically lead to school improvement or student success. Encourages participants to provide their own data for this work, though this is not a requirement. Participants then have an opportunity to use these data sets to create a richer understanding of schools, students, and the many ways the participants can strive toward social justice as educators.

EDU 0988. Integrating Art into the Curriculum. 6.8 Hours.

Seeks to introduce teachers to the value of integrating the arts modalities into the everyday curriculum by providing teachers with strategies that can be used immediately in their classes. Students can expect to engage in drama, poetry, music, creative movement, and visual art. This course is highly interactive.

EDU 0990. Making Schools Safe: Addressing Harassment, Bullying, and Hate Crimes in Schools. 6.8 Hours.

Examines common mistakes and issues contributing to major school conflicts, incidents of violence, racial and other forms of intergroup tensions. Investigates how to assess, prevent, and respond to bullying and harassment, as well as how to identify educationally equitable practices in classrooms and schools to promote engagement of students from diverse backgrounds. Incorporates real-life situations and experiential activities throughout to help participants develop incident-response strategies for successfully communicating with students, parents, and administrators.

EDU 0998. Strategies for Effective Classroom Management. 6.8 Hours.

Offers an interactive course designed to provide educators with the best practices for effective classroom management. Offers participants an opportunity to learn specific strategies on how to establish a productive classroom climate, effectively support students with special learning and behavioral needs, and apply learned techniques and interventions to real-life classroom situations. Examines how to create a learning community that encourages positive social interaction, active engagement, and increased self-regulation for all students.

EDU 0999. Comprehensive Case Management for the Special Education Classroom. 6.8 Hours.

Surveys the unique roles and responsibilities of the special educator as case manager. The overview includes advocacy for students as they develop greater levels of independence and self-directed learning behaviors. Emphasizes liaison competencies through effective communication systems between and among stakeholders in school, home, community, and outside agencies. Explores transition planning, implementation of individualized education plans (IEPs), and the role as team leader. Offers participants an opportunity to develop an understanding of the various systems for collecting and using data to inform instruction and to develop effective program continuums for students with disabilities. Establishes and discusses the legal responsibilities of case management throughout the course.

EDU 1031. Inclusion, Equity, and Diversity. 3 Hours.

Designed to enable current and future teachers to understand and plan for the broad range of student learning and behavioral styles found in every public school classroom. Examines the historical, political, and social forces shaping special and general education, as well as the current push toward Inclusion and Universal Design for Learning, and the implication of this push for students with disabilities. Discusses the neurodevelopmental functions underlying learning, along with their variations and pedagogical implications. Explores how teachers can humanely and effectively respond to the challenging student behavior of many sorts, with strategies grounded in community building, and group and individual management techniques.

EDU 2004. Learning and Accomplished Practice. 4 Hours.

Examines the learning process and how an understanding of the nature of learning can lead to the implementation of effective instruction. Offers students an opportunity to study theoretical perspectives and pedagogical research in order to understand student development and diversity and to focus on how students learn. Challenges students to demonstrate a working understanding of teaching and learning as these occur in different types of school and community settings. All these facets are essential for a comprehension of three core principles: (1) characteristics that students bring to the classroom, encompassing how students are likely to be different from one another; (2) research referring to how students learn; and (3) the conversion of knowledge about development, diversity, and learning into effective teaching practice.

EDU 3405. Inquiry in Humanities and Social Science. 4 Hours.

Examines how teachers enhance children’s understanding of history and social studies, as part of a coordinated approach to the humanities. The goal is for teachers to actively engage students in reading, writing, and speaking through approaches that develop critical skills and habits of mind in relation to issues of citizenship, community, social justice, and the pursuit of truth in an evolving world. The desired outcome is that teachers are able to assist students in preparing themselves to play an active role as citizens in a democratic and culturally diverse society. Explores methodology and curriculum design applicable within and beyond social studies/history and English/language arts.

EDU 3414. Literacy Development and Instruction. 4 Hours.

Introduces foundational theoretical and practical instructional principles for developing reading, writing, and language arts in the elementary grades. Offers students an opportunity to acquire beginning knowledge of varied materials and classroom-based assessment for emergent, beginning, and fluent readers and writers. Explores the interrelationship of reading, writing, listening, and speaking. Focuses on the influence of language, culture, and learning style; on literacy development; and underscores the role of home and community. Addresses issues of equity that surround literacy teaching and learning. Explores how literacy is a sociocultural phenomenon often at the center of political debate. Emphasizes how teachers can meet the needs of all learners and use reading, writing, and language as tools for exploring and questioning the world around them in meaningful ways.

EDU 3415. English-Language Learners in General Education. 4 Hours.

Designed to introduce K–12 general educators to skills that enable them to work more effectively with English-language learners in their classrooms. Explores the history of bilingual education in the United States and other programs used to teach English-language learners. Offers participants an opportunity to develop sheltered English instructional strategies to scaffold lessons that can be used in any classroom setting where English-language learners are present and to plan lessons using Massachusetts English Language Proficiency Benchmarks and Outcomes.

EDU 4818. Supervised Teaching Practicum. 6 Hours.

Offers supervised semester-long student teaching in a classroom in a school system. Guides students in their teacher candidate experience. Seeks to assist students in becoming reflective practitioners. The seminar is structured to provide students with a peer community of practice and designed to acquaint students more intimately with the Pre-Service Performance Assessment Professional Standards for teachers.

EDU 5210. Mind in the Making: Social, Emotional, and Intellectual Learning Are Inextricably Linked. 3,4 Hours.

Designed on the research-based premise that teaching improves when educators have a working knowledge of the significant research in child development and are able to translate this knowledge into their classroom practice. Reviews current research on quality programming for young children. Focuses on translating this research into best teaching practices. Topics include respectful relationships, practices, and policies; social, emotional, and intellectual growth; environments that support child development; multicultural perspectives on parenting and child development; and creating learning communities of teachers and families.

EDU 5900. Consortium Study—Hebrew College. 8 Hours.

Offers an opportunity to study at Hebrew College. May be repeated up to six times for up to 48 total credits.

EDU 5976. Directed Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers independent work under the direction of members of the department on a chosen topic. May be repeated up to five times.

EDU 5978. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers independent work under the direction of members of the department on a chosen topic.

EDU 5984. Research. 1-4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to conduct research under faculty supervision.

EDU 6023. Institute in Creating a Community of Learners/Behaviors. 4 Hours.

Designed to support student understanding of the theory, research, and practice pertaining to creating a sense of community in the classroom. Offers students an opportunity to critically examine a number of behavior management approaches and to develop practical interventions and skills for preventing and remediating behavior problems. Addresses the principles of “functional assessment” through an exploration of “responsive classroom” techniques.

EDU 6050. Education as an Advanced Field of Study. 5 Hours.

Focuses on the critical evaluation, interpretation, and uses of published research in education as a field of study. Offers students an opportunity to explore the relationship between theory and practice and the changing nature of knowledge, to examine peer-reviewed research articles, to learn the “rules” and methods through which these scholarly works are developed, and to begin to apply research findings to real problems and issues in education. As part of this course, students use an ePortfolio as they begin to document their development as scholars, practitioners, and leaders in the field of education.

EDU 6051. Culture, Equity, Power, and Influence. 4 Hours.

Examines the broad construct of culture and explores how these characteristics impact personal identity, access to education, social mobility, power, and influence. Explores educational institutions as cultural systems and questions concepts at the heart of personal and professional interactions in teaching, learning, curriculum, and administration. Expects students to participate in reflective discussion and begin the personal exploration of their own feelings and experience with culture; to develop competencies spanning cultural and international boundaries; to prepare to be more effective in diverse settings; and to influence and advocate for systemic change.

EDU 6054. Emerging Trends in Education: Redesign, Renewal, and Retention. 4 Hours.

Examines the need for and the complexity of initiating and implementing new models of education. Rather than focus on educational reform, the course concentrates on and critically examines exemplary programs, practices, institutions, and policies. Offers students an opportunity to delve into the social, historical, and philosophical foundations of the field, including the theories of diffusion of innovation, barriers to change, “tipping points,” and technological innovation. This dynamic course covers the broad field of education from prekindergarten to lifelong learning, public to private, and home schooling to international.

EDU 6055. Sociocultural Context of Learning and Development. 4 Hours.

Examines learning, teaching, and scholastic development from a sociocultural theoretical perspective that includes situated learning and activity theory. Examines learning achievement and social development of children in diverse educational settings from the perspective that people learn, achieve, and develop as participants in cultural communities. Describes schools as cultural communities and social environments and applies this to the personal and scholastic development in its young people. Examines practices that promote literacy development, numeracy, other academic proficiencies, and identity formation of young people. Using the case of the African-American experience in the United States, the course offers a systematic account of socialization and cultural practices necessary for achievement and development of all learners of diverse backgrounds.

EDU 6064. Curriculum and Assessment. 4 Hours.

Presents how curriculum, student performance, and assessment are currently practiced in a variety of school settings with a view toward changing current practice to meet future needs. Offers students an opportunity to learn how to become active players in creating or improving curriculum at the classroom level, the school, or within a whole school district and to be able to link curriculum and assessment directly to student achievement.

EDU 6086. Foundations of Literacy Development and Instruction. 4 Hours.

Introduces fundamental theoretical and practical instructional principles of developing reading, writing, and language arts, grounded in research on cognitive development and language acquisition, and informed by political and sociocultural perspectives. An integrated language model suggests that reading, writing, and thinking be viewed as interrelated, critical processes for exploring and responding to the world. Offers students an opportunity to acquire foundational knowledge of materials, instructional strategies, and assessment tools that support developing literacy and engaging learners.

EDU 6100. Literacy. 2 Hours.

Introduces the foundations of balanced literacy, theories of literacy development, instructional strategies, assessment, and program development across the grades. Links the focus on early literacy acquisition to clinical assessment and questions regarding English-language learners and students with mild to moderate disabilities and variations.

EDU 6104. Child and Adolescent Development, Learning, and Teaching. 4 Hours.

Surveys contemporary educational theory of human learning and accomplished teaching. Offers students an opportunity to develop a working understanding of teaching and learning as they occur in different types of schools and community settings. Investigates how children and adolescents learn, acquire knowledge, and make sense of their experience, as well as theories of teaching or pedagogy—how best to teach for understanding and learning achievement.

EDU 6107. Inclusion, Equity, and Diversity. 4 Hours.

Addresses the range of learning needs of special education legislation, as well as the politics of who is identified and why. Examines students’ own attitudes about teaching children with learning disabilities. Offers students an opportunity to develop skills and strategies for identifying and teaching learning-disabled children. Requires graduate students to demonstrate advanced levels of study and research.

EDU 6110. Instructional Strategies in Special and Inclusive Education. 4 Hours.

Provides a historical overview of the development of special education in the United States, with a special focus on the post-PL 94–142 period. Raises questions of assessment and classification in relation to race and social class, as well as the ever-evanescent nature of special education classifications in the “mild-to-moderate” range of disabilities. Explores components of assessment, instruction, and curriculum developments for students with a range of learning and behavioral difference and implications for practice.

EDU 6115. Transition to Teacher Seminar 1. 4 Hours.

Readies students for the practicum, EDU 6966. Focuses on human development, curriculum development, and the social/political foundations of urban education. An interlocking set of readings and linked discussions is geared to enabling students to begin developing a viable “philosophy of education” that moves their thinking beyond personal experience. Offers students an opportunity to link theory and practice in ways that take into account the “messy” nature of human difference and political/educational practices.

EDU 6119. Curriculum for the Pre-K Years. 4 Hours.

Presents theories of active learning and learning through play as applied in the prekindergarten years. Offers students the opportunity to learn to specify goals in order to facilitate children’s growth, development, and achievement of skills in communication, inquiry, creative expression, and interpersonal relations; plan, implement, and evaluate content and methodology in various curriculum areas; incorporate developmentally appropriate, integrated learning experiences; select materials and create learning environments; and integrate children with special needs. Requires graduate students to demonstrate advanced levels of study and research.

EDU 6120. Transition to Teacher Seminar 2. 4 Hours.

Focuses on human development and curriculum development, with a deeper and more sustained exploration of learning and behavioral variations and the implications for practice. Examines the links between ongoing assessment and teaching and the implications of curriculum standards on the lives of students—with and without IEPs—and their teachers and families. This seminar is linked to the teaching practicum, EDU 6966. Continues to offer students an opportunity to integrate theory and practice through a cycle of reflection, action, and critique.

EDU 6122. Teaching the Language Arts. 4 Hours.

Offers secondary teachers an opportunity to develop competence and confidence working with diverse students, many of whom appear to read and write only when required to do so. Considers the design and practices of traditional English curricula at the middle and high school level and explores alternative syllabi and unit design as strategies for actively engaging students in the pursuit of meaning in reading and writing as they enhance their skills. Explores the role of research as well as interdisciplinary and collaborative approaches as they relate to curricula in English and the humanities. Requires graduate students to demonstrate advanced levels of study and research.

EDU 6123. Adolescents in the Middle School. 4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to develop a working understanding of human development in adolescence, especially as it applies to teaching and learning in the middle school setting. Focuses on developing a deep theoretical and practical understanding of development of adolescents in the unique social learning contexts and cultures of middle schools. Addresses Massachusetts state standards for teaching in a middle school.

EDU 6124. Teaching History and the Social Sciences. 4 Hours.

Explores the intersecting disciplines of history and social studies, including geography, sociology, economics, political science, and history. Emphasizes the interrelatedness of disciplines and the emerging role of middle and high school students as citizens in their school, community, nation, and the world. Examines the challenge of covering all the material deemed essential by state and district curriculum frameworks, while helping one’s students become problem solvers and critical thinkers in their analysis of social problems. Requires graduate students to demonstrate advanced levels of study and research.

EDU 6125. Making Connections: Schools, Families, and Communities. 4 Hours.

Explores how partnership among schools, families, and community members contributes to whole school reform efforts and the reaching of high academic standards for all children. Reviews the current research on the impact of partnership on student achievement and the effective strategies used by schools to cultivate and maintain partnerships with families and communities.

EDU 6126. Literacy for “Special” Learners: The Challenges of Inclusion. 4 Hours.

Combines classroom and field-based experiences to offer students an opportunity to develop the leader’s capacity to work with leadership teams and a diverse community in an organizational context. Studies the forces that shape organizations and communities that define organizational culture in particular. Uses students’ actual experiences as a springboard to examine organizational function and to explore leader identity and behavior with respect to the specific cultural context of a school.

EDU 6127. Teaching Science. 4 Hours.

Examines how the evolving nature of science—ideas, theories, concepts, and controversies—relates to diverse middle and high school students and how teachers can use experience-based, problem-centered approaches that engage the range of student learners and help them meet local and state learning goals. Identifies research possibilities within school contexts, both inside and outside the laboratory. Explores curricular frameworks and culturally relevant content to enable teachers to create a learning environment that supports inquiry and problem solving. Analyzes examples of excellent curriculum products, programs, assessments, and technology tools. Offers students an opportunity to develop a curriculum unit including assessment philosophy and practices. Requires graduate students to demonstrate advanced levels of study and research.

EDU 6128. Education and Ethics. 2-4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to understand the policies and practices in contemporary education as a dynamic of conflicting power relations, opposing perspectives, and long-standing agendas, as well as obtain a working understanding of, and critical perspective on, the social, cultural, historical, and political dynamics of schools in the United States. Serves as a capstone for the Accomplished Practice Seminar of the MAT program when students present their exit project.

EDU 6129. Teaching Mathematics. 4 Hours.

Explores mathematics teaching methods that are research based, experienced based, and grounded in the contemporary theoretical frameworks influencing mathematics education. Emphasizes issues related to teaching math in an urban school, problem solving, communication, connections, and integrating technology, as well as issues of access and equity, assessment, and cross-content teaching strategies. Requires graduate students to demonstrate advanced levels of study and research.

EDU 6130. Teaching Spanish. 4 Hours.

Explores language teaching methods that are research based, experienced based, and grounded in the contemporary theoretical frameworks influencing language education. Emphasizes teaching Spanish in an urban school, problem solving, communication, connections, and integrating technology, as well as issues of access and equity, assessment, and cross-content teaching strategies. Requires graduate students to demonstrate advanced levels of study and research.

EDU 6131. Assessment. 4 Hours.

Addresses assessing the progress of teachers’ students, formally through exams and informally through many kinds of observation. Today, states and the federal government are engaged in mandating many additional forms of assessments through standardized tests. It is essential for educators to understand the strengths, weaknesses, and purposes of various forms of assessment, while having the skill and understanding to develop clear rubrics for their own assessments and to link all of the many assessments used with their students to their own goals for student learning.

EDU 6132. Curriculum Design and Assessment. 4 Hours.

Explores the discourse about “curriculum” and our thinking about what’s worth learning and teaching. Links learning theory and teaching practice to the community’s impact on the student as learner, the role of pedagogy in creating access to learning for all students, and the selection of curriculum content to create both inclusive and challenging learning environments. Offers students an opportunity to examine and develop several curricula as they explore the theoretical perspectives that affect what and how teachers teach and how they assess student work. Presents an opportunity, prior to student teaching, for students to model the concrete activities of the curriculum design process and their reflection on that process. Requires graduate students to demonstrate advanced levels of study and research.

EDU 6134. Interdisciplinary Curriculum Design. 4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to create coherent, standards-based curricula that integrate two or more academic disciplines. Covers how to employ interdisciplinary curricula to better use instructional time while allowing students to examine topics in greater depth and from multiple perspectives. Also offers students an opportunity to learn how to use backward design to plan curricula and to articulate overarching themes and essential questions that provide organizational centers for interdisciplinary curricula. Focuses on the selection of instructional and assessment strategies that are well suited to interdisciplinary curricula. .

EDU 6152. Inquiry in the Humanities and Social Sciences at the Elementary Level. 4 Hours.

Examines how teachers enhance children’s understanding of history and social studies as part of a coordinated approach to the humanities. The goal is for teachers to engage students actively in reading, writing, and speaking through approaches that develop critical skills and habits of mind in relation to issues of citizenship, community, social justice, and the pursuit of truth in an evolving world. Explores methodology and curriculum design, applicable within and beyond social studies/history and language arts/English. Requires graduate students to demonstrate advanced levels of study and research.

EDU 6153. Inquiry in Math and Science at the Elementary Level. 4 Hours.

Examines how teachers enhance children’s understanding of math and science as part of a coordinated approach to the sciences. Explores methodology and curriculum design, applicable within and beyond math and science. Requires graduate students to demonstrate advanced levels of study and research. .

EDU 6154. Inquiry in the Sciences and Humanities. 4 Hours.

Explores methods for enabling children in grades 1–6 to experience the dynamics of scientific investigation as they develop their abilities to make thoughtful observation and make meaning of the results of those observations. Examines methods and materials, pedagogies, and assessment strategies that foster integrated learning across the sciences, social sciences, and humanities.

EDU 6155. Inquiry in Mathematics. 4 Hours.

Explores methods for teaching mathematics in grades 1–6 that are research and experience based and grounded in the contemporary theoretical frameworks influencing mathematics education. Designed to increase students’ knowledge of mathematics as it simultaneously explores the intrinsic nature of math and methods for relating it to children. Emphasizes approaches to teaching mathematics that engage diverse populations of children.

EDU 6161. Literacy Development and Instruction. 4 Hours.

Uses an inquiry approach to explore the rich complexity of literacy development and instruction in the elementary grades. Considers reading and writing as ways of exploring and reacting to the world in a thoughtful, articulate manner. Considers how reading, writing, speaking, and listening are interrelated, critical processes for exploring and responding to the world. An integrated language model serves as a basis for instructional methodology. Explores a range of approaches to reading and writing instruction based on students’ own experiences and questions, in light of research on cognitive development and language acquisition, and informed by political and sociocultural perspectives. Requires graduate students to demonstrate advanced levels of study and research.

EDU 6162. Language, Culture, and Literacy in Middle and High Schools. 4 Hours.

Examines the interrelationships among language, culture, and identity and explores the implications of those relationships for effective teaching in middle schools and high schools. Considers issues of linguistic diversity within their broad sociopolitical and philosophical contexts, emphasizing how language discrimination functions within the context of other forms of systematic oppression in our society. Explores the processes of identity development in the context of schooling and literacy performance. Also examines methods of helping linguistically diverse students to develop their oral and written language abilities within a learning environment that draws upon and celebrates their native language abilities and traditions. Requires graduate students to demonstrate advanced levels of study and research.

EDU 6170. Constructing Knowledge. 5 Hours.

Uses a case study, reflective approach to link the classroom experience to educational theories and frameworks. With additional resources provided by Northeastern University, offers participants an opportunity to use their yearlong goals and plans to explore and incorporate learning theory, developmental stages, multiple intelligences, memory, motivation, and learning differences. Affords participants an opportunity to examine their teaching experiences through a variety of lenses, ranging from developmental learning, inclusion, equity, and diversity. In this course, participants are asked to critically look at curriculum standards and pedagogy of their discipline in relation to each investigated topic, engage peers in dialogue, and examine their assumptions and practices.

EDU 6172. Creating an Effective Learning Environment. 5 Hours.

Offers participants an opportunity to look beyond traditional unit and lesson planning and critically explore the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks, unpack their standards, and use data from their classrooms to drive instructional planning. Participants have an opportunity to analyze instructional models and consider how each impacts what students learn, who is less likely to learn, and how to create an inclusive, accessible learning environment. As part of effective instruction, participants examine and critique their own delivery of instruction and management of a classroom, engage with peers around best practices, and reflect on how their practices impact a broad range of students and their learning outcomes.

EDU 6174. Strategies for Effective Instruction. 5 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to delve into culturally responsive teaching, authentic assessment, and literacy for secondary students. Critical topics include how we are engaging students, if assessments accurately demonstrate student learning, are we differentiating curriculum to meet all students’ needs while still addressing state standards, what it’s like to be a student in my class, how racial identity impacts learning and classroom culture, the meaning of literacy today, and how to apply literacy strategies.

EDU 6180. Teacher as Researcher. 4 Hours.

Introduces students to examples of teacher research, provides an opportunity for them to design and conduct a classroom-based research project, and encourages them to consider the potential role for teacher research to help understand and ultimately transform teaching practice. Provides a model of collaborative practice for teachers as well as instruction in specific skills and approaches to classroom-based research.

EDU 6181. Research Design in Education. 4 Hours.

Introduces inquiry methods that may be used to design research projects and to create effective learning environments. Offers students an opportunity to understand how to design, evaluate, critique, and interpret research outcomes, with an emphasis on the collection and interpretation of quantitative results, and to become proficient in the selection and use of appropriate statistical analysis approaches.

EDU 6182. Educational Statistics. 4 Hours.

Focuses on concepts and methods used in applications of introductory statistics in education. Emphasizes applications to problems in education that are not covered in statistics courses elsewhere and do not involve derivations of statistical techniques. Covers frequency measures, measures of central and general location, measures of variation and probability and their use in making inferences, setting confidence levels, type one and type two errors, tests of significance inclusive of one- and two-sample t-tests, one- and two-way analyses of variance and chi square, correlational techniques inclusive of linear and multiple regression, and analysis of covariance and nonparametric statistics.

EDU 6183. Collaborative Strategies for Effective Classroom Management. 1 Hour.

Explores best practices in classroom organization and behavior management. Topics range from developing student-centered classrooms, routines, and space to strategies for managing transitions, classroom dynamics, individual behaviors, and positive behavioral support systems. Offers participants an opportunity to think critically and plan for a collaborative and productive classroom learning community.

EDU 6184. Interdisciplinary Foundations. 2 Hours.

Provides the iCert Program orientation through three areas of focus: reflection and self-assessment to inform the course selection process; exposure to a broad vision of the contemporary workplace and the competencies required for career success as individuals, members of organizations, and as global citizens; and development of an individual Professional Learning Plan (PLP). Includes a variety of academic and career-related support systems as students embark on a journey that builds on past experiences while providing opportunities for reflection as they develop goals for the future.

EDU 6185. English-Language Learners in the General Education Classroom. 4 Hours.

Designed to introduce K–12 general educators to skills that enable them to work more effectively with English language learners in their classrooms. Explores the history of bilingual education in the United States and other programs used to teach English language learners. Offers participants the opportunity to develop sheltered English instructional strategies to scaffold lessons that can be used in any classroom setting where English language learners are present. Offers participants an opportunity to plan Sheltered English Immersion (SEI) lessons in a Sheltered Instructional Observation Protocol (SIOP) template using the World-Class Instructional Development and Design English Language Development (WIDA ELD) Standards. This course meets DESE requirements for the Sheltered English Immersion (SEI) endorsement.

EDU 6200. Management of Higher Education Institutions. 3 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to understand the structure, governance, and operations of institutions of higher education, as well as the roles and functions of various administrative positions and offices. Topics include understanding environmental and competitive forces, assessing strengths and weaknesses, managing change and institutional transformation, and issues of implementation and operational execution.

EDU 6201. The Landscape of Higher Education. 4 Hours.

Seeks to provide the foundation to understand the structure, governance, and operations of institutions of higher education, as well as the roles, functions, and interactions of various administrative positions and offices. Through scholarly publications, research articles, and theories, offers students an opportunity to prepare to work and advance effectively within higher education by appreciating its complex organizational structure and its historical context. Assesses how these constructs are subject to today’s environmental, financial, technological, and competitive pressures; considers how higher education might implement innovation and change; and offers students an opportunity to design strategies for change.

EDU 6202. Faculty, Curriculum, and Academic Community. 4 Hours.

Examines collaborative approaches to developing and improving both curriculum and the delivery of that curriculum. Faculty and curriculum are not only the core of an institution of higher education, they are also what make institutions of higher education unique from any other type of organization. Topics include academic structure and governance within the context of the wider university community in not-for profit and for-profit institutions. Examines faculty unions, academic freedom, tenure, and the increasing role of adjuncts. Assesses how administration, faculty, and staff interact in an integrated, collegial environment.

EDU 6203. Education Law, Policy, and Finance. 4 Hours.

Offers an overview of the major aspects of the legal, political, and financial environment that impact institutions of higher education, which are affected by laws and policies that range from access, affordability, readiness, and completion to gainful employment. Offers students an opportunity to learn multiple approaches for addressing these requirements, for understanding and influencing policy development at all levels, and for navigating higher education’s financial complexities, both internal and external.

EDU 6210. Faculty: Evolving Roles. 3 Hours.

Examines faculty structure and governance, teaching and practice, faculty assessment and rewards, evolving roles, curriculum design, and basic pedagogical concepts. Faculty and curriculum are not only the core of an institution of higher education, they are also what make institutions of higher education unique from any other type of organization. Today, the role of faculty is changing significantly as tenure is reexamined, adjunct faculty are increasingly becoming the faculty of record in many institutions, electronic delivery of education expands, and globalization and for-profit entities alter curriculum and delivery.

EDU 6211. New Directions for Adult Learning. 3 Hours.

Examines the social and psychological aspects of adult development and learning, the latest technology tools, and the various motivations of adult learners. Begins by recognizing that the concept of lifelong learning has become an increasing reality as adults continually engage in learning activities, whether through their employer, institutions of higher education, or self-directed study. Plus, adult learning is now often delivered electronically via computer, video, or podcasts. Offers students an opportunity to learn various methods of training and development, as well as specific instructional practices, both online and on-ground.

EDU 6212. Needs and Competencies Assessment. 3 Hours.

Examines the various assessment tools and techniques that exist for assessing competencies and organizational needs. Organizations frequently attribute employee performance issues to inadequate training or development, but assessing what the specific competency gaps are often requires both sophisticated assessment instruments and a professional understanding as to how best to address those competency gaps. Topics include learning management systems, delivery options, learning objects, and competency assessment.

EDU 6213. Curriculum and Program Development. 3 Hours.

Focuses on the curriculum development process and takes a project management view of program development. The majority of today’s professions require a level of content expertise and specialization that necessitates the continuous development and updating of curriculum and programs intended to prepare individuals for their respective profession. Offers students an opportunity to learn rubrics for curriculum design and their application to course and program development.

EDU 6214. Facilitation and Instruction. 3 Hours.

Examines recent scholarship on teaching and instruction as it pertains to adult students. Offers students an opportunity to learn specific approaches and methods for classroom management and facilitation, as well as train-the-trainer techniques. Topics include establishing an outline, assessing student performance, instructional technology, platform and presentation skills, and addressing difficult issues.

EDU 6215. Higher Education Law. 3 Hours.

Provides an overview of the major aspects of the legal environment that specifically impact institutions of higher education. Institutions of higher education are affected by laws that range from privacy and reporting to admissions and financial aid practices. Offers students an opportunity to learn strategies for addressing these legal requirements and for staying abreast of emerging legal concerns.

EDU 6220. Retention and Enrollment Strategies. 3 Hours.

Examines specific strategies and approaches for building inquiry and application pools, improving retention, targeting specific populations, and positioning the institution in the market. Effective enrollment management needs to support and be aligned with the mission and priorities of an institution. While an understanding of how demographic shifts, international preferences, economic forces, and changes in the law impact enrollment projections and strategies is essential, going beyond these fundamental causal relationships is critical to achieving enrollment management goals in today’s dynamic and competitive environment.

EDU 6221. Enrollment, Retention, Graduation, Success. 4 Hours.

Considers the mission of an institution as inseparably linked to student success. Simply identifying, recruiting, and enrolling students is no longer a measure of institutional or academic success. With demographics changing, institutional finances straining, and student loan debt increasing, it is strategically important, and difficult, to find the right students, support them, retain them, and have them graduate prepared for gainful employment. Taught from a systems thinking perspective, examines the multifold ways to consider cost and academic effectiveness. Emphasizes the use of data for decision making, along with policies, practices, and strategies needed to improve an institution’s academic reputation and, ultimately, graduation rates.

EDU 6225. Capstone. 4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to reflect on concentration-specific work, considering their development as scholars, practitioners, and leaders in the field of education. Requires students to demonstrate mastery of content through practicum or a significant project adapted to the professional requirements of each concentration. After a thorough process of feedback and revision, students are required to present their final ePortfolios in a public forum to showcase their work and demonstrate achievement of program competencies.

EDU 6230. Program Evaluation and Assessment. 4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to learn how to establish goals based on measurable outcomes, how to set benchmarks for performance measurement, and how to demonstrate the impact of a program on an organization’s bottom line. Program evaluation and assessment is critical to quality assurance and continuous improvement. Mechanisms that demonstrate value added are also important to organizations that sponsor training and development efforts. Examines issues related to accreditation and other academic program reviews. This is a capstone course that offers students an opportunity to design and conduct an approved research project.

EDU 6235. Applications Project. 4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to build competency related to their specific objectives by applying concepts learned in foundation courses to the particular type of organization they work within or the job function in which they expect to apply their knowledge.

EDU 6240. Instructional Technology. 4 Hours.

Explores ways in which to leverage technology to support both online and on-ground classes. Instructional technology has largely become synonymous with distance learning, but even online technology can substantially enhance on-ground classes. As students have become increasingly comfortable with newer technologies, they have also come to expect technology utilization in their curriculum. Topics include streaming audio, streaming video, platform selection, effective layout, visual considerations, accessibility, and emerging technology.

EDU 6250. Employer Relations. 3 Hours.

Examines workforce development programs from the employer’s perspective. Discusses the idea and practice of dual customer service delivery. Offers students an opportunity to learn how to create an employer strategy based on population, goals, services, and economic context. Explores methodology on providing employers with return on investment for hiring and methods to demonstrate added value.

EDU 6251. Strategic Planning, Program Design, and Implementation. 3 Hours.

Designed to provide hands-on tools and the underlying concepts related to building and operating a quality workforce development program. Offers students an opportunity to learn how to select target populations for a program, set attainable and valuable program outcomes, and grapple with challenges of career-path employment for entry-level workers. Explores strategic positioning and planning, program design considerations and theory, challenges in program startup, and issues regarding implementation. Students are expected to complete individual course projects, one of which may be to design a new workforce program for their respective employers.

EDU 6252. Work with Participants. 3 Hours.

Provides an overview of the approaches to working with participants in workforce development programs. Topics include assessment tools and techniques, the importance of developing both soft skills and job-related skills, case management models, resources for getting participants ready for work, developing skills competency standards, retention strategies, and overall management of the process of working with participants.

EDU 6253. Understanding Labor Markets. 3 Hours.

Offers a comprehensive microeconomic approach to neoclassical wage theory and the theory of labor markets. Focuses on labor supply, household production, marginal productivity, human capital, and research. Examines alternative labor market theories, including the efficiency wage theory and the dual labor market theory. Offers students an opportunity to learn how to conduct local and regional labor market analysis as part of developing a workforce development strategy.

EDU 6254. Research and Evaluation. 3 Hours.

Examines quantitative and qualitative research methods with regard to their applicability to social services and other nonprofit programs. Covers experimental designs but emphasizes quasi-experimental designs and links evaluation questions to data analysis techniques. These approaches include observation, surveys, structured and unstructured interviews, and document analysis. Topics include the following types of evaluation: process (formative), outcome (summative), impact and needs assessments, cost-benefit analysis, and performance monitoring. Uses case studies and hands-on exercises.

EDU 6255. Workforce Development Policy. 3 Hours.

Reviews the national and state history of workforce policy. Examines the socioeconomic and political causes of policy shifts, as these have occurred over time. Analyzes current policy as well as reviewing best policy practices in the current economic context.

EDU 6256. Impact of Technology on Higher Education. 3 Hours.

Examines technology’s societal, educational, administrative, and security implications for higher education. Technology in society, and therefore in higher education, is rapidly evolving, creating a gap between student expectations and faculty and administrative utilization. Offers students an opportunity to debate how technology both strengthens and weakens teaching and learning, learn how to make informative (and cost-effective) technology-implementation decisions, understand the impact technology makes on business processes, examine the effect of new and emerging technologies, and become familiar with security requirements.

EDU 6265. Race, Class, and Power in Urban Education. 4 Hours.

Incorporates extensive site-based work during the quarter. Offers students an opportunity to analyze urban education systems through the policies and processes that define the urban schools and impact the students, teachers, and administrators in those schools. Topics include urban demographic trends; the implications of race and culture on student assessment and curriculum design; public legislation and policy responses to issues of race, class, and ethnicity; and techniques in community outreach and involvement.

EDU 6270. Special Topics in Urban Education. 4 Hours.

Explores the politics of bilingual and ESL education options in urban schools and the process and approaches to bilingual and ESL education in the school and classroom. Focuses on the identification of race and class-based issues related to special education testing, assessment, and pedagogy. Requires students to conduct class observation and interviews with teachers, administrators, and community leaders.

EDU 6271. Understanding the Financial Landscape of Education. 3 Hours.

Investigates the different revenue sources of not-for-profit colleges and universities: public support, tuition, philanthropy, fees for service, research, endowment interest, sports revenue, grants, etc. Begins by recognizing that colleges and universities are ultimately dependent, as in any organization, on financial resources to operate. Where do institutions of higher education get their funding? What do they do with the financial resources they have? Particularly addresses the many complexities and common restrictions involved in financial management, funds allocation and use, and when and if financial exigency is necessary.

EDU 6275. Urban Education in Social Context. 4 Hours.

Focuses on questions such as what makes urban education different from or the same as K–12 education in suburban and rural America; what is the relationship of the local community to urban schools; how do local and municipal politics impact the urban school and classroom environment; and how do poverty and privilege intersect in the urban classroom? Centers on a systems approach to urban education. Explores the intersection of the education systems with other related systems—from the local and municipal sociopolitical systems to the urban family systems that interact with urban schools.

EDU 6280. Urban Education Elective. 4 Hours.

Encourages students to choose one additional course from the other discipline course offerings in the MED program. For example, teachers may want to take a course in the reading, writing, and literacy or math concentration to explore the specific applications of that discipline in urban education. Education administrators may want to take a course in the education leadership or adult and organizational learning concentration.

EDU 6285. Urban Education Project Seminar. 4 Hours.

Explores critical issues that impact the urban education environment. Offers students an opportunity to identify their particular critical questions based on their professional perspective as teacher or administrator and to identify their specific action research topic. Requires students to prepare a research proposal and, once complete, to present the proposal to the class. .

EDU 6290. Portfolio and Panel Review. 4 Hours.

Explores critical issues that impact the urban education environment. Offers students an opportunity to identify their particular critical questions based on their professional perspective as teacher or administrator and to identify their specific action research topic. Requires students to prepare a research proposal and, once complete, to present the proposal to the class.

EDU 6300. Introduction to Language and Linguistics. 4 Hours.

Explores the foundations of language and linguistics. Discusses theories of the origins of language and compares reading and writing systems of English and other languages. Offers students an opportunity to learn phonology (how sounds are produced), how English works in patterns (linguistics and phonetics), how meaning is conveyed (semantics), and how languages are used (pragmatics). Seeks to provide a foundation for courses related to teaching English as a second language.

EDU 6302. Teaching, Learning, and Assessment: How English Is Learned and Used. 4 Hours.

Focuses on how languages are learned using technology and assessed with and without technology. Explores theories and methods for teaching grammar, listening, speaking, composition, reading, pronunciation, vocabulary, and integrated skills. Offers students an opportunity to develop an informed, explicit understanding of second-language learning and assessment through reading, theory, and practice.

EDU 6305. Sheltering Content Instruction, TESOL Beginnings/ESL/EFL Skills Lab. 2 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to observe lesson demonstrations and practice theories and techniques on real ESL/EFL students. Students are observed by their instructors and peers.

EDU 6308. Designing and Managing an ESL/EFL Classroom. 3 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to learn how to plan lessons, design activities, assess learners, and become familiar with techniques for promoting interaction, providing feedback, utilizing textbooks, developing one’s own materials, dealing with mixed-ability-level groups, and incorporating strategy training in lessons to better manage a classroom. Demonstrates formal and informal assessment methods for both receptive and productive skills and explores strategies used for addressing student errors in the classroom. Examines the levels of English-language proficiency and their benchmarks, as described by the State of Massachusetts.

EDU 6310. Literacy Development and the Academic Domains. 4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to learn how to adapt their instruction to the language needs of the students in their classes. Reading, writing, speaking, and listening are the keys to academic success for students for whom English is not the first language. It is critical to understand the research about early literacy development, vocabulary development, process writing, peer editing, comprehension and metacognition, content reading, and literacy assessment. Students read the research, discuss the theory behind the research findings, and have an opportunity to learn how to apply those findings to the unique content and skill challenges they will face as classroom teachers.

EDU 6312. TESOL Practicum and Seminar. 5 Hours.

Focuses on learning how to plan lessons, design activities, and assess English-language learners. Offers students an opportunity to become familiar with techniques for promoting interaction, providing feedback, utilizing textbooks and other materials, developing one’s own materials, dealing with mixed-ability-level groups, and incorporating strategy training in lessons to better manage a classroom. Demonstrates formal and informal assessment methods for both receptive and productive skills, and explores strategies used for addressing student errors in the classroom. Students observe and report on an ESL class/program and develop a syllabus for an ESL class of their choosing. Provides a field-based assessment of teaching performance.

EDU 6319. How People Learn. 4 Hours.

Introduces the research and science of learning, integrating theory with case studies about learning principles and high-impact practices. Learning takes place in all stages of life: teenagers who go directly from high school to college, adults who “stop out” and return to school after years of work or family commitments, and even retirees who pursue learning made possible by expanded leisure time. Some education takes place formally within higher education; other opportunities are informal, sponsored by organizations such as museums and libraries or available for free online. Focuses on learning in online and mobile environments.

EDU 6320. New Technologies and Emerging Trends for Distance Learning. 3 Hours.

Focuses on the state of the art in today’s distance education, including theory and technology of distance education. Introduces emerging trends and concepts for the future of distance learning. Offers students an opportunity to learn about what types of infrastructures are needed to support online learning. Areas of focus include creative applications of technology for staff and faculty development and training, library, academic and student support services, open source utilization and partnerships, peer learning, and self-teaching paradigms. Serves as a distance learning primer and road map for educators. Should be taken as the first course in the certificate program.

EDU 6321. Models for Learning Design. 4 Hours.

Offers an orientation to learning design as art and science. Design has the capacity to support or detract from learning and, therefore, the design process itself needs to be intentional and evidence driven. Participants experiment with putting learning principles and high-impact practices into action within online and mobile learning scenarios. Investigates the many settings in which learning design takes place and considers the interplay between context and design methodology.

EDU 6322. Iterative Design of Learning Experiences. 4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to develop and teach an online minicourse that is designed to yield evidence of learning. Considers outcomes-oriented design, purposeful organization, facilitation, and embedded feedback. Learning is an iterative cycle and the same holds true for teaching. If reflection and evidence gathering are integrated into the process, each learning experience builds upon and influences the next. This course takes a studio approach to course creation. After running the course for their classmates, participants have an opportunity to use peer feedback and learning evidence to refine and improve their minicourses.

EDU 6323. Technology as a Medium for Learning. 4 Hours.

Investigates the role that technology can play in transforming the learning experience. Emphasizes interactive approaches that increase learner access, persistence, and engagement and designs that yield evidence of learning. In addition to investigating research relevant to media design, such as visual-auditory processing, cognitive load, and universal design, the course introduces protocols for aligning technology strategy with learning goals and learner needs. Offers students an opportunity to experiment with a suite of emerging technologies and then to develop an online, media-rich learning environment.

EDU 6324. Competencies, Assessment, and Learning Analytics. 4 Hours.

Analyzes the intended outcomes of education, how we will know if we’ve made a difference, and what we can do to improve learning along the way. These hard but important questions are at the heart of learning design. The act of assessment verifies that learning has taken place, but it also provides opportunities for refining plans and improving student learning. Some strategies are easily implemented, while others require advanced expertise. Covers recent advances in technology that make it possible to gather a wealth of data on how people interact within the environments in which they learn, recording each click of the mouse. In education, the use of this data to improve learning is referred to as “learning analytics.”.

EDU 6325. Teaching Strategies in E-Learning. 3 Hours.

Focuses on new technologies and trends in distance learning for innovative teaching practices. Offers students an opportunity to explore in detail how emerging technologies are being applied in online student- and faculty-support systems and models, needs assessments, student evaluation and assessment, integration of new technologies in courses, and scalable design and development of online courses.

EDU 6326. Adult Learning Theory for Distance Learning. 3 Hours.

Covers concepts and approaches for lifelong learning activities in the adult distance learning student population. Explores the social and psychological aspects of adult development and learning, including the various motivations of adult learners. Offers students an opportunity to examine methods of teaching and development and instructional best practices in this environment.

EDU 6327. Innovative Management of Distance Learning Program. 3 Hours.

Focuses on assessing the needs of a distance learning program and developing strategies to meet those needs. Offers students an opportunity to learn about learning management systems (LMS) and portals, electronic learner support systems, administration and budgeting, course support, training, marketing and promotion, copyright laws, and other policy issues related to distance programs.

EDU 6328. Policy and Leadership. 4 Hours.

Designed to engage students in systems thinking, specifically about how education policies at the federal and state levels impact teaching and learning in elementary and secondary schools. Studies the fundamentals of how policy is created and implemented and analyzes the ways in which competing visions of the purpose of public education frame policy debates and outcomes. Focuses on a variety of contemporary policy initiatives. Offers students an opportunity to evaluate the effectiveness of specific policies that relate closely to their professional roles and to seek to identify and practice the skills educators need in order to assume leadership roles in directly and indirectly influencing policy.

EDU 6329. Connecting Theory and Practice. 4 Hours.

Involves participants in ePortfolio-based reflection regarding professional goals, progress toward program- and concentration-level competencies, and opportunities for connecting theory and practice. Investigates the “integrative knowledge” approach to evidence-based learning, reflection, and professional identity development. With input and feedback from peers, faculty, and the student’s professional environment, participants then have an opportunity to develop a plan for experiential learning. The plan describes a three-to-five-month workplace-based, scholar-practitioner experience that is responsive to the needs of the employer, yet also steeped in the contemporary issues, science, and theory of learning design.

EDU 6330. Digital Media Literacy. 4 Hours.

Addresses how K–12 educators learn and use digital media literacy to prepare students for the world of tomorrow. Introduces students to innovative teaching and assessment practices as well as theoretical and philosophical orientations around participatory culture and literacies. Examines the interrelationships between cultural competencies, traditional literacy, research skills, technological skills, and critical thinking skills. Explores the role of ethics, authentic assessments of student learning, and differentiation of instruction in K–12 contexts. Requires graduate students to demonstrate advanced levels of study, application, and research.

EDU 6331. E-Learning Design as a Collaborative Profession. 4 Hours.

Explores the process of working with others to identify strategic directions about an institution’s vision for the future, investment of resources, and distinctiveness; to benefit from multiple perspectives and sets of expertise, such as educators, technologists, and institutional researchers; and to respond constructively to conflicting visions and interests. Online and mobile learning is a complex venture. At the program level, key players collaborate on the development of curricula that often need to be vetted at many levels of the institution. E-learning designers often play a critical role in the project management of program and course development. Offers students an opportunity to consider their individual strengths and growth areas as collaborators.

EDU 6332. Open Learning. 4 Hours.

Investigates the history, philosophy, and theoretical perspectives of open learning. While face-to-face classrooms have physical limits on how many people can attend, millions of people can access the same materials at the same time using online and mobile environments. Early innovators on the Web proclaimed that “information wants to be free.” This perspective is the heart and soul of open learning, whose mission often includes global and affordable access to education. Analyzes whether an open approach is appropriate for the learning scenario, the strategy for sustainability, if the learning experience is equally viable across cultural and economic demographics. Takes a case-study approach that investigates and critically analyzes open learning exemplars. Expects students to design and develop an open learning experience.

EDU 6333. Social Media and Beyond. 4 Hours.

Explores pedagogically sound practices for using social media to improve learning. Learning is enhanced when course participants have an opportunity to forge communities of interest, leveraging collaborative relationships to expand and deepen inquiry. When deftly designed and implemented, social media can increase the engagement of learners and the impact of an experience. Offers participants an opportunity to experiment with a range of social media applications.

EDU 6337. Instructional Technology. 4 Hours.

Examines the ways in which technology can enhance the teaching process and the learning experience in K–12 classrooms.

EDU 6340. Learning Analytics Concepts and Theories. 4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to learn about diverse perspectives in the field of learning analytics—including learning analytics assumptions, theories, epistemologies, and debates—in order to understand this emerging field. Explores distinctions among educational data mining, learning analytics, and big data, as well as their relationships to data analytics. Discusses key ethical, practical, and cultural challenges to the effective and appropriate use of learning analytics. Expects students to demonstrate their understanding of learning analytics concepts and theories through the development of a learning analytics philosophy statement.

EDU 6341. Introduction to Data Mining in Education. 4 Hours.

Offers an overview of educational data mining, data preparation, and the fundamentals of using data mining software. Using the Cross-Industry Standard Process for Data Mining (CRISP-DM) methodology, illustrates the principles and practice of data mining. The course structure follows the stages of a typical data mining project, from reading data, to data exploration, data transformation, modeling, and effective interpretation of results. Offers training in the basics of how to read, explore, and manipulate data with data mining software and then create and use successful models. Expects students to demonstrate their educational data mining skills through a hands-on final project.

EDU 6342. Data Preparation for Learning Analytics. 4 Hours.

Builds on skills covered in EDU 6341. Offers students an opportunity to learn to prepare data and build the final data set for predictive modeling, to develop skills necessary to extract and understand data elements, to transform data formats, and to derive new relationships among them. The final deliverable from the student in this course is a fully processed data set compatible for building predictive models that can be used to improve student learning and educational outcomes.

EDU 6343. Predictive Modeling for Learning Analytics. 4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to learn how to develop models to predict categorical and continuous outcomes, using such techniques as neural networks, decision trees, logistic regression, support vector machines, and Bayesian network models. Reviews expert options for each modeling node in detail and advises when and how to use each model. A hands-on final project offers students experience implementing predictive models.

EDU 6344. Data Visualization for Learning Analytics. 4 Hours.

Studies how to synthesize the technical components of data analysis into reports, presentations, and visual dashboards that are meaningful for the intended audience and deliver those components in a coherent, convincing format. In addition to gathering and interpreting data, today’s educational environment requires the ability to communicate the results of data analysis to a variety of audiences. Expects students to produce a sample research report as a culminating project.

EDU 6345. Text Mining for Learning Analytics. 4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to learn practical techniques for mining unstructured text data (such as that found in learning management system discussion boards, social media, student assignments, survey data, etc.) for the purpose of creating predictive models or reports based in part on text data. A hands-on final project offers students experience implementing text mining techniques.

EDU 6407. Essentials of Multimedia for Distance Learning. 3 Hours.

Covers fundamentals and best practices for designing, developing, and delivering engaging, interactive educational content over the Web. Offers students an opportunity to use selected multimedia tools and applications to design multimedia projects that demonstrate effective distance learning for adults.

EDU 6408. Evaluation and Assessment for Distance Learning. 3 Hours.

Focuses on evaluating the effectiveness of training, course design, and overall program design in adult distance learning. Covers Kirkpatrick’s four levels of evaluation, designing evaluation instruments, collecting data, and interpreting evaluation results. Offers students an opportunity to learn how to use feedback to implement change and continuous improvement in distance learning programs.

EDU 6409. Legal and Intellectual Property Issues for Distance Learning. 3 Hours.

Focuses on the use and delivery of intellectual property and the Internet. Examines in detail fundamentals of the TEACH Act, fair-use policies, methods for obtaining permission for use of intellectual property, recommended guidelines for use of intellectual property, and best practices to establish usage policies. Uses case studies to examine well-known issues and resolutions.

EDU 6425. Special Education: Role of Special Educators in an Inclusive School. 4 Hours.

Designed to enable teachers to plan for the broad and varied range of student learning and behavior and build a foundation for inclusive schools. Offers students an opportunity to understand the policies and regulations in special education; the role of the special educator in writing and implementing individual education plans (IEPs); the responsibility of special educators to create partnerships with families; and the role of the special educator in working within the school on curriculum across disciplines, service delivery for students with IEPs, and co-teaching models. Explores high- and low-tech assistive technology options and its integration into practice and the facilitation of principles of universal design. Using a case-study approach offers students an opportunity to analyze and problem-solve scenarios derived from field experience.

EDU 6426. Developmental Language, Literacy, and Writing: Assessment and Instruction. 4 Hours.

Introduces fundamental theoretical instructional principles of developing oral and written language, reading, writing, and language arts skills. Offers students an opportunity to learn about materials, instructional strategies, and classroom-based assessment for literacy development and instruction and empowering both elementary and secondary readers. Links a focus on early literacy acquisition with clinical assessment and questions regarding English-language learners and students with mild-to-moderate learning disabilities and variations.

EDU 6427. Differentiated Assessment and Instruction. 2-4 Hours.

Examines formal and informal assessment measures, including the interpretation of educational and psychological testing, curriculum-based assessment, classroom assessments, and their implications for instruction. Offers students an opportunity to translate results of norm-referenced assessments and curriculum-based assessment into goals for intervention and effective instructional strategies, as well as to learn how to understand the limitations of assessments and to develop the skills to design authentic and meaningful assessment that reflects student learning and drives instruction.

EDU 6429. Variations in Child and Adolescent Development. 4 Hours.

Reviews the biological, neuropsychological, psychosocial, cognitive, behavioral, and ecological theories of development. Examines variations and progress in the developmental domains and the intersection among these domains in development and learning in terms of disability and language differences within these theoretical perspectives. The impact of culture on development is infused throughout. Introduces assessments and interventions in development and learning.

EDU 6431. Developing Skills and Accessing Ideas: Curriculum . 4 Hours.

Examines questions in ways designed to ensure that educators are better able to help all students access the curriculum consonant with state and local frameworks and the students’ specific learning and developmental needs. A major challenge facing inclusive, general, and special education teachers is “implementing inclusive practices in a standards-based environment.” Seeks to answer how educators can begin to address the diverse learning needs of their students and how curriculum design can embody the flexibility necessary to accommodate students with learning and behavioral variations and difficulties.

EDU 6432. Reading Processes: Theory into Practice. 4 Hours.

Studies current research on reading development and instruction and their links to classroom practice. Explores literature in reading topics including language, phonics, vocabulary, and comprehension. Offers in-service teachers an opportunity to build on their experiences in their own classrooms as they consider and apply relevant research to their own practices. Issues facing English-language learners in reading development are threaded throughout the course.

EDU 6433. Writing Processes: Theory into Practice. 4 Hours.

Analyzes current research on writing development and instruction and its link to classroom practice. Explores literature in writing topics, including process writing in a variety of genres, phonics, spelling, and mechanics. Offers in-service teachers an opportunity to build on their experiences in their own classroom as they consider and apply relevant research to their own practices. Issues facing English-language learners in writing development are threaded throughout the course.

EDU 6436. Best Practices for the 21st-Century Education. 4 Hours.

Focuses on the twenty-first-century classroom, a heterogeneous community with a wide variety of student strengths, needs, and cultural experiences. Explores the philosophical and theoretical foundations of curriculum development and instruction across the disciplines in K–12 classrooms with a focus on utilizing the advantages and richness of this diversity. Examines the best pedagogical practices for meeting the needs of diverse students through a variety of topics, including differentiation; the role of technology; establishing positive classroom environments, routines, practices; and the role of critical thinking at every level.

EDU 6437. Assessment in Education. 4 Hours.

Examines principles and practices in assessment for learning and assessment of learning. Assessment and evaluation take different forms depending on the setting, from preschool to graduate school and beyond, each presenting unique opportunities and challenges. Regardless of context, effective assessment serves more than one purpose: as a strategy for improving learning and as a means for verifying that learning has taken place. This course offers participants an opportunity to consider the assessment strategies that are most relevant to their specific educational contexts.

EDU 6438. Teachers as Curriculum Leaders. 4 Hours.

Explores how to translate curriculum development theory and vision into advocacy and action. Offers students an opportunity to develop a perspective and skills that allow them to be effective teacher-leaders in modifying curriculum across content areas, including math, science, history, and English-language arts. Seeks to prepare students to lead initiatives and projects, including those at the classroom, school, and district level. Examines state curriculum frameworks and other standards alignment and evaluation.

EDU 6445. Internationalization at Home: Concept and Application. 4 Hours.

Examines—through concepts and applications, methods, and structures—ways to create a vibrant international experience for students and educators with limited ability to travel. In our competitive global society, the opportunity to experience directly a different culture, language, food, and customs is paramount to being a global citizen. But what about the vast numbers of faculty and students worldwide who cannot take the time to travel or who do not have the funds to live abroad? Uses case studies and technology currently used for internationalization at home to examine the theoretical framework and current thinking on the concept. Offers students an opportunity to create a curriculum to apply internationalization at home to their educational setting.

EDU 6446. Nontraditional Learners: Administrative Implications and Strategies. 4 Hours.

Studies the impact upon academic and social structures as nontraditional students—adults completing undergraduate degrees or pursuing professional degrees, veterans, single parents, and traditionally underserved or immigrant populations—enroll in person and online at higher education institutions in greater numbers. Arriving with perspectives and requirements significantly dissimilar from those of the traditional 18- to 22-year-old student, this course examines implications upon financial and technical infrastructures, academic and support services, etc. Students are expected to research and critique the literature regarding these populations, globally, and to debate changes to existing programs and structures. The final project is the creation of postsecondary learning and administrative environments and/or policies resulting from the needs of these growing communities.

EDU 6447. The Demographics of Higher Education. 4 Hours.

Provides an up-to-the-minute analysis of who accesses postsecondary education in any of its forms, from certificate to technical to community college to the various types of four-year and graduate-level institutions. Examining changing demographics, the course evaluates societal, cultural, and vocational development needs of students from the 18- to 22-year-old traditional student to adults completing college or pursuing professional degrees. Addresses issues of access, readiness, affordability, persistence, and employment upon completion of the degree, with an eye toward designing programs and interventions that contribute to student success.

EDU 6450. The Globalization of Education. 4 Hours.

Emphasizes a global view of political structures, educational systems, workforce development, and issues of interest to the student and specific to the culture and region studied. Offers students an opportunity to deepen their global knowledge and understanding through intensive research by comparing and investigating systems and ideals, examining alternative solutions, and engaging in critical dialogue and debate. Students are expected to prepare and present a research paper on their work.

EDU 6452. Critical Scholarly Investigation: On Location. 4 Hours.

Offers a faculty-led experiential learning opportunity for graduate students to further investigate their research topic in the designated country or region. Offers students an opportunity to enhance their global perspective through exploring local resources, discussions and lectures with hosting institution faculty, meetings with experts in their field of research, and collaboration with other graduate students. Students are expected to present their research findings.

EDU 6462. Children’s Literature. 4 Hours.

Examines literature for children and young adults. A consistent theme is the historical progression of literature and its reflection of and influence on society. Studies a wide range of children’s literature from picture books to children’s novels. Analyzes language, poetry, illustrations, mediums of art, and decisions that affect tone and mood.

EDU 6465. Critical and Creative Thinking. 4 Hours.

Explores critical and creative thinking, particularly the ways in which the two types of thinking operate together. Focuses on K–12 classrooms and how teachers can bring critical and creative thinking to the center of their curriculum and instruction. Approaches critical and creative thinking as skills that can improve through practice but remains mindful of the relationship between thinking skills and specific academic content. Offers participants an opportunity to examine theories and research involving critical thinking and creativity, engage in activities designed to help them become more familiar with their own ways of thinking, and design strategies for teaching critical thinking and creativity in their own classrooms.

EDU 6470. Empowering Struggling Readers and Writers. 4 Hours.

Offers an advanced course in reading that critically examines literacy programs and initiatives and how to use them effectively in the classroom. Offers students an opportunity to further investigate reading and writing across the curriculum; assess reading/writing skills; design appropriate support for diverse learners; and select and utilize children’s and adolescent literature, trade books, and other print material to empower competent readers and writers.

EDU 6471. Integrating Technology for Differentiating Instruction and Improving Student Outcomes. 4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to learn how to design and modify curricula with technological support to meet the learning needs of all students, as well as opportunities to plan instruction that integrates technology in a way that engages students and extends learning, while creating an inclusive environment for students with special needs. Many schools purchase low- and high-tech assistive devices and software programs, but teachers need to be prepared to integrate these resources into the curriculum.

EDU 6472. Advanced Special Education Strategies. 4 Hours.

Designed for practicing special educators and graduate students completing teacher/special education licensure programs. Uses cutting-edge research to explore advanced topics in special education. Modules include assistive technology, special education law, autism spectrum disorders, severe disabilities, neuroscience, and legal and data-driven individualized education plan (IEP) development.

EDU 6473. Different Brains, Different Learners: How to Reach the Hard to Teach. 4 Hours.

Offers both special and general educators an opportunity to learn, with the use of powerful tools, techniques, strategies, and approaches, how to assist students with disabilities to achieve their potential. Some of the disabilities addressed are oppositional defiant disorder, attention deficit disorder, dyslexia, hyperactivity, depression, and auditory processing disorder.

EDU 6475. Ethical and Legal Complexities of Special Education. 4 Hours.

Reviews case briefings, case law, and due process hearing decisions to provide guidance for education professionals on how to prepare for a due process hearing or mediation/fair hearing and how to develop a “cue book“ for testifying, surviving examination and/or cross examination, and avoiding legal pitfalls that may result from giving testimony. Teachers and administrators encounter ethical and legal dilemmas in special education practice. Uses case studies to explore practical applications, legal mandates, critical issues, and ethical special education practices utilizing guidelines of the Council of Exceptional Children (CEC) and the American Psychological Association (APA).

EDU 6481. Inquiry in Reading and Writing across the Content Area. 4 Hours.

Explores ways in which reading and writing instruction and development extend across the curriculum and enhance student understanding and exploration of their world. Offers in-service teachers an opportunity to build on their experiences in their own classrooms as they consider and apply a range of instructional practices appropriate for different disciplines, while also seeing the commonalities across disciplines.

EDU 6483. Empowering Struggling Readers and Writers. 4 Hours.

Offers educators a conceptual framework and practical strategies for reaching the diverse learners in their classes. Suggests assessment procedures, grounded in an understanding that literacy learning is influenced by cultural and linguistic experiences, to offer teachers an opportunity to identify effective and practical ways to differentiate instruction within the mainstream classroom. Also offers opportunities to explore specialized resources and approaches.

EDU 6484. The Power of Literature for Children and Youth—Literature and the Arts. 2 Hours.

Examines selected illustrated texts to offer teachers an opportunity to learn how to integrate the aesthetics of music, art, and literature while engaging their students in critical exploration of seminal themes of racism and equity, justice, and survival.

EDU 6502. Best Practices in Early Childhood Education. 2-6 Hours.

Explores best practices for high-quality early childhood education, as defined by the National Association for the Education of Young Children accreditation criteria. Focuses on the following key standards for quality early education: teaching, relationships, curriculum and assessment, classroom and school environment, and family and community engagement. Offers students an opportunity to learn about the content and rationale for accreditation standards in each of these five areas, to develop a portfolio to document high-quality practices in one of these standards, and to reflect on their own teaching practices and consider ways to implement the best-practices standards in their classrooms and schools.

EDU 6503. Institute in Educational Leadership. 6 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to gain a broad understanding of the role of the school principal within a school environment that extends beyond the traditional institutionally based program, as well as to identify and analyze content, curriculum, and instruction in the light of current research; to identify problems and design and implement solutions to such problems; to evaluate and field-test various curriculum approaches; to apply new knowledge and skills to classroom practice; and to gain the knowledge, skill, and expertise to become school leaders. This program leads to certification in school administration.

EDU 6504. Institute in Educational Leadership. 6 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to gain a broad understanding of the role of the school principal within a school environment that extends beyond the traditional institutionally based program. Provides students with the opportunity to identify and analyze topics such as content, curriculum, and instruction in the light of current research; to identify problems and design and implement solutions to such problems; to evaluate and field-test various curriculum approaches; and to apply new knowledge and skills to classroom practice, with the goal of obtaining the knowledge, skill, and expertise to become school leaders. .

EDU 6505. Institute in Educational Leadership. 6 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to gain a broad understanding of the role of the school principal within a school environment that extends beyond the traditional institutionally based program, as well as to identify and analyze content, curriculum, and instruction in the light of current research; to identify problems and design and implement solutions to such problems; to evaluate and field-test various curriculum approaches; to apply new knowledge and skills to classroom practice; and to gain the knowledge, skill, and expertise to become school leaders. This program leads to certification in school administration.

EDU 6514. Survey of Content and Strategies for Teachers of ESL. 2 Hours.

Surveys content and teaching strategies for teachers of English as a second language. Explores strategies for listening and speaking, discussions on various topics, persuasive speaking, narrative, and conversation.

EDU 6515. Language and Learning Challenges. 4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to obtain an understanding of students with learning disabilities in the context of schooling for all children, many of whom may be in special education and inclusionary programs. Presents a developmental view of linguistic, cultural, cognitive, physical, and socioeconomic characteristics of learners who are labeled learning disabled or who have learning differences. Examines the causes and consequences of learning disabilities as differences in relation to neuroscience, language, and culture. .

EDU 6516. Sheltered English Instruction and Assessment. 4 Hours.

Designed for students that are already familiar with the SIOP (Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol) Model, the widely implemented research-based foundation for supporting the English-language learners in many current classrooms. With the switch to the rigor of Common Core and the focus on close reading and complex texts, this course seeks to deepen the practice of teachers to effectively plan and deliver lessons that meet this demand. Exposes students to even more strategies beyond the SIOP that are necessary to enable English-language learners to be successful with the Common Core State Standards.

EDU 6517. Foundations of Teaching English as a Second Language: Research and Practice. 4 Hours.

Reviews the basics of language acquisition theory and strategies for incorporating academic vocabulary into content instruction and assessment of language proficiency. Joins theory to practice by introducing students to current instructional research and practice and includes fieldwork. Offers participants an opportunity to begin to learn how to translate theory into practical strategies for teaching content in culturally sensitive ways using the Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol (SIOP), World-Class Instructional Design and Assessment (WIDA) standards, and the Common Core. Every educator shares the responsibility for ensuring that students who are in the process of learning English have every opportunity to increase their understanding of the content. This requires understanding the cultural context of each student’s background and the level of their progress in English-language acquisition.

EDU 6520. Learning and the Brain: Translating Research into Practice. 4 Hours.

Introduces current, cutting-edge brain-related research and the implications for classroom practice. Draws upon research from neuroscience, psychology, and education to investigate the following topics as they relate to the brain and learning: anatomy, research-based strategies that are effective for students with learning disabilities, current research in the underlying causes of learning disabilities, learning to read, influencing behavior, and future areas of exploration.

EDU 6528. Adaptive Learning/Behavior Management Strategies: Consultation and Collaboration. 4 Hours.

Seeks to extend participants’ competence in theory, research, and practice pertaining to creating a sense of classroom community, family engagement, and school culture. Examines behavior management approaches and offers participants an opportunity to develop practical interventions and skills for preventing, intervening, and remediating behavior problems. Participants also have an opportunity to apply inclusive principles to the classroom, examine student issues and learning needs, and analyze delivery models to consider how to impact participants’ teaching, classroom, and school.

EDU 6530. Beyond Behavior Management. 4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to move beyond the rudimentary “management of behaviors” and examine teaching rooted in clearly defined expectations and logical consequences, teaching that helps foster communal responsibility, self-discipline, and self-determination for students with disabilities and their “typical” peers. Contains a sustained examination of specific programs (i.e., Assertive Discipline, Tribes, the Responsive Classroom) and observational and problem-solving tools.

EDU 6534. Bilingualism, Second Language, and Literacy Development. 4 Hours.

Introduces second-language acquisition (SLA) and bilingualism. Studies how learners create a new language system, frequently with only limited exposure. Covers the debates in the field whose main claim is that second-language acquisition is dynamic and nonlinear. Addresses how native language facilitates or impedes SLA, the universal processes affecting SLA, the challenges advanced second-language learners encounter in higher education, and the question of identity transformation. Emphasizes the components of language structure and their relevance to language learning and literacy; issues in culture, language socialization, and cognitive processes in language acquisition; variability of language learners; and language learners in academic context. Some of the major disciplines that contribute to SLA include theoretical linguistics, psychology, anthropology, conversation analysis, and sociology.

EDU 6535. Introduction to Instructional Technology. 2 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to refine their technology skills as they relate to teaching and learning in the classroom or lab. Provides an introduction to how computers can best support classroom instruction.

EDU 6536. Integrating Technology into the Curriculum. 4 Hours.

Explores research and implementation of strategies for effective integration of technology into the curriculum.

EDU 6537. Learning Theory and Instructional Design Strategies. 2 Hours.

Explores the differences between key learning theories and their effective use in the design of accessible learning activities.

EDU 6538. Assessment Elementary. 2-4 Hours.

Examines the methods and materials related to formal and informal assessment, analysis, and interpretation of the results of assessment to inform effective instruction for students at the elementary level. Focuses on the needs of students from varied populations, including English-language learners.

EDU 6539. Assessment Secondary. 2-4 Hours.

Examines the methods and materials related to formal and informal assessment, analysis, and interpretation of the results of assessment to inform effective instruction for students at the secondary level. Focuses on the needs of students from varied populations, including English-language learners.

EDU 6540. Nuts and Bolts of IT: Hardware, Software, and Maintenance. 2 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to learn the basics of computer hardware, software, networks, and simple maintenance; how to install upgrades to the operating system; about networks and their variety of uses in an educational setting; and basic troubleshooting tips and techniques for both Macintosh and PC computers. Students work both singly and in small groups to install hardware and software.

EDU 6542. Online Learning. 2 Hours.

Covers the research and implementation of strategies for effectively integrating online resources as well as computer-based CD-ROM reference materials into the curriculum. Explores employing optimal search strategies using popular search engines such as Google, Alta Vista, Yahoo, Magellan, and Lycos to find resources. Offers students an opportunity to learn how to create Web quests and resource-rich Web pages for use in projects and presentations, as well as to learn to use Web authoring tools to develop home pages linked to curriculum and community resources.

EDU 6543. Designing Effective Professional Development Models. 4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to research effective models of professional development. Students work in groups investigating common principles of effective professional development programs incorporating the latest research on addressing students’ learning styles and share their results with the class. Using these principles, each team then designs an activity, including an evaluation component, to address a common need they have identified in their school districts.

EDU 6544. Principles of Curriculum Development. 2 Hours.

Explores effective models of curriculum design used in a variety of school districts around the country. Offers students an opportunity to design instruction utilizing effective curricular and assessment strategies.

EDU 6545. Designing Model Technology Plans. 2 Hours.

Examines model technology plans and the role of technology as a facilitator of meaningful reform in the teaching-learning process. Students work in groups to research, design, and share assessment instruments to determine a district’s hardware, software, networking, staffing, and professional development needs. They also work in groups to create and present a model technology plan based on research-based models of technology use tied to state frameworks and local curriculum goals.

EDU 6547. Developing Effective Policy and Management Strategies. 2 Hours.

Explores and analyzes the politics of K–12 education at the local, state, and federal levels. The political realities of the community in which schools sit, the municipal system of education, and state and national education policy priorities impact local schools and classrooms. Emphasizes such contemporary issues as school choice, standardized testing, the influence of political interest groups, and urban school reform policy. Offers students an opportunity to explore and develop the skills and strategies necessary to equip students with the vision and impetus to be transformative social change agents.

EDU 6548. Universal Design of Curriculum. 2 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to develop K–12 curriculum and teaching strategies sensitive to all learners, especially students in regular classrooms with high-incidence disabilities such as mild cognitive and fine motor difficulties or ADHD. Universal classrooms use digital media to mold existing and emerging curriculum materials and approaches to teaching, making it more responsive to the needs of diverse learners. Using school-based case studies, students work in cooperative groups during class time to identify and address barriers to students’ learning. Requires students to complete a final project focused on the strengths and limitations of one new digital technology based on a literature review and an investigation of a school-based implementation.

EDU 6549. Research Seminar: Investigating Critical Issues in Education. 2 Hours.

Considers and analyzes a range of critical issues confronting educators today from the perspective of what is known about how they impact teaching and learning in the classroom. Students are asked to select one of these issues to research in greater depth and to report on as it relates to their professional practice. Requires students to gather, evaluate, critique, and interpret the collected data to support their examination of the issue in question.

EDU 6551. Historical Context of School Leadership and Change. 4 Hours.

Includes past and present metaphors of the principalship, reflecting societal, political, and economic contexts and influences; school-change theories and history, including the work of Tyack and Cuban, Senge, Sizer, Payne; and reviews of responses to “A Nation at Risk” and the standards movement. Asks participants to conduct an analysis of their school district cultures and place efforts in which they have participated in the context of larger school-change efforts.

EDU 6552. Leadership, Voice, and Theory. 4 Hours.

Reflects a variety of thinking and research about leadership and organizational development across educational, political, and business contexts. Includes the work of Sergiovanni, Evans, Fullan, Depree, Bolman and Deal, and Meier among others. Encourages participants to use their school experiences to access key conversations, planning, and decision making across the topics explored in the course. Expects participants to independently research and analyze additional theorists and scholars in the domain of leadership whose ideas offer applicability and relevance, as well as to seek out and diagnose current examples in practice via case studies, educational publications, and news articles.

EDU 6553. Operations/Systems, School Development, and Public Engagement. 4 Hours.

Covers school-based management and budgeting, including prioritizing for cuts and/or surplus, safety planning, staffing and organization, interviewing and outplacement, use of public and private funds, fund-raising and partnership development, and public relations and communications. Encourages students to use their district-based internships to access key conversations, planning, and decision making across the topics listed above and include in their portfolio observations, reflections, and key questions about their specific contexts.

EDU 6554. Teaching and Learning. 4 Hours.

Centers on the development of routines and habits, core knowledge, and skills of the effective and committed principal as an instructional leader. Readings include the work of Barth, Donaldson, Shmoker, Sizer, Dufour, Tatum, Hilliard, and Saphier. Examines field notes and observations, district supervision and evaluation instruments and practices, and staff conversations to offer the aspiring leader an opportunity to develop a level of comfort and expertise in supervising and supporting teachers in their instructional responsibilities. Emphasizes understanding key observational practices, substantiating claims with evidence, and developing a cogent vocabulary with which to understand and express key aspects of pedagogy and assessment.

EDU 6555. Principal as Instructional Leader. 4 Hours.

Centers on the development of routines and habits, core knowledge, and skills of the effective and committed principal as an instructional leader. Readings include the work of Barth, Donaldson, Schmoker, Sizer, Dufour, Tatum, Hilliard, and Saphier. Examines field notes and observations, district supervision and evaluation instruments and practices, and staff conversations in an effort to assist the aspiring leader to develop a level of comfort and expertise in supervising and supporting teachers in their instructional responsibilities. Emphasizes understanding key observational practices, substantiating claims with evidence, and then developing a cogent vocabulary with which to understand and express key aspects of pedagogy and assessment.

EDU 6556. Educational Leadership: Creating a Culture for Learning. 2 Hours.

Explores the acquisition and application of the theories and practices needed to redefine educational accountability within an integrated system that includes leadership, teaching, and curriculum for student achievement; to abandon initiatives that are ineffective, obsolete, and superfluous; and to develop the skills to evaluate, coach, and develop future leaders. Also explores identifying and solving difficult instructional and learning problems.

EDU 6557. Curriculum Leadership. 2 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to explore strategies for framing curriculum-related problems and planning curriculum changes. Major topics include the relationship between standards-based education and previous curriculum traditions and theories; student, teacher, and school factors that influence curriculum experiences; the differences between contrived and genuine collaboration for curriculum planning and curriculum improvement; the use of assessment and data to improve curriculum and learning.

EDU 6558. Issues in Education. 1-4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to explore in-depth a current educational issue, long-standing unresolved educational problem, and/or ways of considering innovation and change in education. The topic alternates each time the course is offered, and students are allowed to enroll each time the focus of the course changes. May be repeated up to 15 times for up to 16 total credits.

EDU 6566. Collaborative Leadership for Organizational Change. 4 Hours.

Designed to give school leaders an opportunity to read, write, and reflect on school organizations and cultures, forms of school governance, the change process, and the concept of collaborative leadership as it pertains to the development of efficiently run schools. Reviews and discusses in-depth the impact of the federal No Child Left Behind Act and the Massachusetts Education Reform Act on the organizational culture, governance, and leadership of public education.

EDU 6567. Organization and Administration of Special Education. 4 Hours.

Designed to provide the principal, assistant principal, or other supervisor with a comprehensive overview of the makeup of special education programs as they currently exist within the public schools of Massachusetts. Topics include special education law, IEP development, discipline of students with disabilities, inclusion, co-teaching and program development, as well as the finances involved in special education. These topics are explored through discussion, research, readings and class presentations.

EDU 6569. Differentiated Instruction and Assessment in Mathematics. 4 Hours.

Focuses on the development of individualized intervention programs for children and youth in need of special education. Offers students an opportunity to translate results of norm-referenced diagnostic assessments and curriculum-based or criterion-referenced assessments into goals for intervention and effective instructional strategies. Explores the use of data to differentiate mathematics and other instruction. Offers students an opportunity to learn the limitations of assessments and to develop informal classroom-based assessments that reflect student learning and drive instruction.

EDU 6570. Advanced Strategies in Literacy: Readers and Writers Who Struggle. 4 Hours.

Focuses on the complex challenges faced by children and youth who struggle (or fail) to achieve measurable success in reading and writing. Considers teaching and learning environments, variations in language, learning, and cognitive styles and development. Examines cultural expectations and student motivation, as well as an array of instructional and assessment approaches and measures. Offers students an opportunity to learn how to describe and analyze the difficulties encountered by struggling readers and writers and to identify and evaluate a range of appropriate strategies to address those difficulties.

EDU 6574. Mentoring in Action: Instructional Coaching for Educators. 4 Hours.

Seeks to advance effective teaching practices that enhance student learning through mentoring protocols. The instructor uses an interactive reflective approach that highlights practical strategies, readings, and research that can be adapted for all grade levels. Topics include observation and feedback techniques, quality conversations for busy educators, strategies for group mentoring, and organizing a new teacher support program. Presents a month-by-month curriculum for supporting effective teaching practices. Emphasizes conversations related to student learning. Course objectives are aligned with the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE) Guidelines. Participants also have an opportunity to learn how to implement effective mentoring protocols that retain qualified teachers. Materials are appropriate for mentor teachers, coaches, department chairs, and administrators.

EDU 6579. Second-Language Learning and Teaching. 2 Hours.

Designed to meet the Massachusetts DOE category 1 requirements for teachers of LEP students. Offers students an opportunity to explore key factors affecting second-language acquisition, the implications for classroom instruction, the cultural aspects of instruction, and ways to modify instruction to meet student needs.

EDU 6580. Teaching Reading to Limited English Proficiency Students . 3 Hours.

Designed to meet the Massachusetts DOE category 4 requirements for teachers of LEP students. Offers students an opportunity to explore the basic concepts of linguistic theory and practice for developing reading skills; strategies and practices for developing reading skills and for teaching vocabulary; initial reading instruction; knowledge of performance criteria; and the scoring system used in the MEPA.

EDU 6581. New Technologies and Emerging Trends for Online Learning in the Secondary Classroom. 3,4 Hours.

Offers an intensive course to serve as a road map to introduce educators to new technologies and emerging trends for the design and delivery of online learning in a secondary school environment. Explores the theory and practice for effective online delivery, introduces various curriculum models that support online learning, examines the tools and technologies used to support these emerging models, and studies creative approaches to effective teaching and learning in online environments. Offers students an opportunity to become familiar with the fundamentals and best practices for online learning in a secondary school, to obtain a common vocabulary of terms related to online learning, and to be prepared to participate in the subsequent courses in this program.

EDU 6582. Best Practices for School-Based Online Teaching and Learning. 3,4 Hours.

Investigates strategies and best practices for teaching fully online and hybrid courses in secondary classroom environments. Explores the fundamental elements of effective classroom instruction and work to clarify how these elements apply to teaching online. Through reading, listening, writing, and viewing, offers students an opportunity to immerse themselves in a variety of effective online learning activities for secondary students. Group work and reflective exercises provide opportunities to critically examine how specific instructional strategies may be applied to support teaching.

EDU 6583. Innovative Management of Online Learning in Secondary Schools. 3,4 Hours.

Focuses on the identification and assessment of online learning programs in secondary classrooms. Using case studies, offers students an opportunity to examine emerging trends and significant research in online learning and to become familiar with effective approaches to managing and deploying online programs. Presents strategies for developing successful online programs and identifying learning management systems (LMS) and portals for delivery. Exposes students to best practices for successful online learner-support systems, effective administration and budgeting practices, training and support frameworks for teachers, as well as intellectual property guidelines for faculty and students and other policy issues related to online programs.

EDU 6584. Evaluation and Assessment of Online Courses in Secondary Classroom Environments. 3,4 Hours.

Focuses on the effectiveness of online courses and programs in secondary classroom environments. Offers students an opportunity to learn how to establish key metrics and build systems to capture performance data that demonstrate competencies for online course outcomes that determine effectiveness in comparison with traditional face-to-face offerings as well as to explore best practices for formative and summative assessments of learning outcomes in the online classroom and demonstrate competencies. Explores early formative assessment approaches and warning systems to resolve gaps in student achievement. Subjects covered include Kirkpatrick’s four levels of evaluation, designing evaluation instruments, collecting data, and interpreting evaluation results. Students also have an opportunity to learn how to use feedback to implement change and continuous improvement in online courses and programs.

EDU 6585. Essentials of Multimedia for Teaching and Learning in Secondary Classrooms. 3,4 Hours.

Focuses on selection and implementation of emerging multimedia and Web-based tools for effective teaching and learning in secondary online educational environments. Explores strategies for identifying appropriate tools and technologies for the online classroom, facilitating online learning, and delivering educational applications and activities over the Web or within a technology-enhanced learning environment. Offers students an opportunity to use selected multimedia tools and applications to design projects and evaluate multimedia that demonstrate effective technology-mediated learning for secondary education settings. Examines case studies of successful emergent examples for deploying and using multimedia in secondary classrooms nationally.

EDU 6586. Legal and Intellectual Property Issues for Online Learning in Secondary Classrooms. 3,4 Hours.

Focuses on ways to ensure legal and appropriate use and delivery of intellectual property over the Internet for the purpose of teaching and learning in secondary classroom environments. Explores current standards and emerging trends for protecting intellectual property in online classrooms and for adopting recognized best practices for legal use of intellectual property according to the TEACH Act, fair-use doctrine, and Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA). Offers students an opportunity to examine the use of intellectual property and to learn about strategies for copyright compliance as well as to examine a range of timely and high-impact issues and challenges and to identify possible resolutions to those issues.

EDU 6587. Using Data to Enhance Student Achievement. 4 Hours.

Explores how to use data more effectively. Examines ways of collecting and analyzing data. Expands common notions of data beyond grades and test scores to include more subtle forms of data such as classroom observations and environmental surveys. Educators are increasingly surrounded by data. However, studying educational data does not automatically lead to school improvement or student success. Encourages participants to provide their own data for this work, though this is not a requirement. Participants then have an opportunity to use these data sets to create a richer understanding of schools, students, and the many ways the participants can strive toward social justice as educators.

EDU 6588. Integrated Teaching Through the Arts. 4 Hours.

Introduces teachers to the value of integrating the arts modalities into the everyday curriculum by providing teachers with strategies that can be used immediately in their classes. Explores activities that appeal to the multiple intelligences through participation, readings, discussions, and presentations.

EDU 6589. Evidence-Based Practice for School Counselors. 4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to explore the elements of evidence-based practice, examine different research-based curricula, and discuss the unique position of counselors as agents of positive change for schools and students and how to negotiate and collaborate to realize those changes. School counselors must now demonstrate how their work results in measurable student outcomes in academic, social/emotional, and career domains.

EDU 6590. Making Schools Safe: Addressing Harassment, Bullying. 4 Hours.

Explores the increasingly serious problems of bullying, harassment, and hate crimes in the schools and cyberspace, as well as the laws governing appropriate responses to these problems. Examines the impact of school climate on learning and student achievement and the most common mistakes and issues contributing to major school conflicts, incidents of violence, and racial and other forms of intergroup tensions. Offers students an opportunity to examine how to assess, prevent, and respond to bullying and harassment.

EDU 6591. Integrating Poetry and Drama across the Curriculum. 4 Hours.

Encourages participants to tap into their creativity through the medium of dramatic and poetic arts. Seeks to enable them to engage students, deepen learning, foster innovation, and make interdisciplinary connections to the curriculum and goals of state standards. Designed for teachers of all grades and disciplines. .

EDU 6592. The Critical Mind: Inspiring Interdisciplinary Thinking in American Humanities. 4 Hours.

Seeks to enable teachers to transform American literature and history courses or units into inclusive interdisciplinary humanities models. Using the prevailing philosophy and ideas of each historical era as a paradigm, the course examines examples of literature, history, music, art, architecture, and archetypal American heroes as depicted in classic American films. Participants are encouraged to engage in classroom discussions, breakout sessions to share new possibilities for interdisciplinary lesson plans, and activities that enhance curriculum content. .

EDU 6593. Supporting Traumatized Children in the Least Restrictive Environment. 4 Hours.

Examines the necessary supports for children with trauma histories to become successful in school. Explores strategies for restructuring academic content, the application of therapeutic and behavioral interventions for positive supports, ways to ensure a safe school environment, and activities to build the social and interpersonal skills of traumatized children. Also reviews family dynamics and stressors related to parenting a child with trauma, along with information on accessing available supports.

EDU 6594. Directed Study: Education Policy Development. 4 Hours.

Designed to provide, in a directed study format, instruction leading to better understanding about education policy development; implementation; and implications at the local, state, and national levels. Provides participants with current research and articles and requires them to develop and present a product that focuses on an aspect of policy presented in the materials as it applies to the current education climate.

EDU 6595. Systems, Policies, and School Governance. 6 Hours.

Examines theories of organizational systems and change, the impact of school policies on school culture and academic success, and school governance all under the common vision of equity and excellence. Special topics include school budgets, special education, and school law. Examines theories of instructional and curriculum leadership. Offers students an opportunity to connect instruction, curriculum, and assessment as they relate to systems, policies, and governance and to demonstrate their developing leadership skills through a presentation to a panel of educators.

EDU 6596. Instructional Leadership. 6 Hours.

Examines theories of instructional and curriculum leadership, child development, and family and community engagement. Special topics include issues related to English-language learners. Addresses connections between instruction, curriculum, and assessment. Explores the following questions: What is great teaching and why does it matter? How do I lead teachers to agree on a set of (research-based) teaching practices and implement these consistently schoolwide, promoting equity and excellence for all students?.

EDU 6597. Supervision and Evaluation. 6 Hours.

Examines theories of supervision and evaluation and explores what is great teaching and why it matters. Also examines the following questions: How do I bring consistency into school practices? How do I evaluate teaching while developing, supporting, and sustaining great teaching in the school? How do I lead for equity? Offers students an opportunity to develop a portfolio of their yearlong learning as an aspiring principal to give evidence of their competency in all areas required by the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education.

EDU 6598. Strategies for Effective Classroom Management. 4 Hours.

Offers an interactive course designed to provide educators with the best practices for effective classroom management. Offers participants an opportunity to learn specific strategies on how to establish a productive classroom climate, effectively support students with special learning and behavioral needs, and apply learned techniques and interventions to real-life classroom situations. Examines how to create a learning community that encourages positive social interaction, active engagement, and increased self-regulation for all students.

EDU 6599. Comprehensive Case Management for the Special Education Classroom. 4 Hours.

Surveys the unique roles and responsibilities of the special educator as case manager. The overview includes advocacy for students as they develop greater levels of independence and self-directed learning behaviors. Emphasizes liaison competencies through effective communication systems between and among stakeholders in school, home, community, and outside agencies. Explores transition planning, implementation of individualized education plans (IEPs), and the role as team leader. Offers participants an opportunity to develop an understanding of the various systems for collecting and using data to inform instruction and to develop effective program continuums for students with disabilities. Establishes and discusses the legal responsibilities of case management throughout the course.

EDU 6601. Integrating the Visual Arts into the Elementary Classroom. 4 Hours.

Introduces students to effective strategies for integrating works of art into classroom learning, with a particular emphasis on using art to help students develop critical thinking and literacy skills. A powerful form of communication and expression, engagement with art brings possibilities for wonder and connection into the classroom. Such experiences inspire creative thinking and reinforce that capacity for creativity that is inherent to us all. Furthermore, artworks provide unique opportunities for differentiated instruction.

EDU 6602. Using Graphic Design as a Teaching Tool for the K–12 Classroom. 4 Hours.

Explores how to integrate visual presentations, posters, timelines, and diagrams into classroom practice. Offers participants an opportunity to learn what it means to “think like a graphic designer.” The language of graphic design lives in the classroom. Through presentation, dialogue, hands-on work, and critique, participants explore curriculum content and practices and assess non-text-based student work. Designed to support those in nonart content areas across the disciplines, including teachers of English-language learners and special education. No technology or art skill is required.

EDU 6604. Cross-Cultural Awareness: Successful Cultural Contact in the Classroom. 4 Hours.

Explores the realm of culture: What are our own cultural values and assumptions? How do they affect our awareness of and interaction with people from different cultures? Discusses the role that one’s culture plays in cognitive processes, communication, decision making, and problem solving. Works toward developing a blueprint for tuning one’s skills to the cultural values of a diverse student population.

EDU 6606. Building Reading Comprehension and Vocabulary Skills. 4 Hours.

Explores reading instruction with an intensive focus on improving reading comprehension skills, building students’ vocabulary, and providing strategies that support students in answering open response questions. Designed to be directly linked to the classroom instruction. Topics include implementation and use of guided reading and literature circles, developing inferential thinking skills, and bringing vocabulary development into daily classroom instruction. Participants are asked to draw on their experiences as classroom teachers and are expected to implement learned strategies into their classroom practice. .

EDU 6610. Debates in American Educational History. 4 Hours.

Offers current and future professionals working in education-related fields an overview of the debates concerning the purposes of schooling in the United States. From the creation of a common school system, the expansion of schooling during Reconstruction, and the reforms spawned by progressive education, to the report “A Nation at Risk” and the No Child Left Behind legislation, examines the major debates about the purpose of schools. Also examines the current debates about standards, high-stakes testing, vouchers, and charter schools. Seeks to provide a strong foundation for current and future professional practice. Offers students an opportunity to shape the course—and their participation in it—to connect to their own intellectual interests and professional goals.

EDU 6611. Access and Inclusion: Strategies for Teaching Diverse Learners . 3 Hours.

Focuses on access and inclusion and the strategies for teaching diverse learners. Topics include identifying a particular learning community and the needs of that community, using theory in practice, the application of assessment, goal setting, intervention strategies, and evaluation in the classroom and school. Explores issues of advocacy and equity of student groups. .

EDU 6612. Legal Issues in Special Education . 4 Hours.

Examines the historical, legal, and ethical perspectives of educational services for learners with special needs. Offers participants an opportunity to understand the legal background, including the constitutional and statutory basis for understanding legal issues, in special education. Emphasizes these issues as they apply in Massachusetts. Reviews court and administrative decisions, exemplary programs, relevant current literature, and the development and implementation of an Individualized Education Plan (IEP).

EDU 6613. Closing the Achievement Gap: Instructional Talk in a Teacher Team. 4 Hours.

Designed to guide teachers in developing and reflecting on their practice as members of a team. Topics include improving student learning, enhancing inclusion strategies, new teacher support, and developing peer coaching relationships. Focuses on issues related to the “achievement gap” and how instructional talk in a team can affect teaching and learning. .

EDU 6614. Balanced Literacy. 4 Hours.

Explores ways that teachers, grades K–8, can incorporate the use of literature circles and guided reading into classroom instruction. Includes the core instructional techniques of guiding reading and literature circles as well as the effective use of assessment to enhance literacy instruction and evaluate effectiveness. Discusses the art of discussion, grouping, text selection, direct instruction of comprehension, scaffolding instruction, assessment, and curriculum management.

EDU 6615. Behavioral Interventions for Special Populations—Principles and Procedures . 4 Hours.

Introduces the principals of learning theory and how to apply empirically valid behavioral-based interventions in order to improve socially significant behaviors. Course content relates specifically to those individuals with developmental disabilities who attend public and collaborative special education classrooms. Offers students an opportunity to learn about the basic principles of behavior and how to apply them in order to increase, reduce, or promote the generalization and maintenance of behavior.

EDU 6616. Behavioral Interventions for Special Populations—Practical Applications. 4 Hours.

Explores evidence-based behavioral interventions and methodologies used to teach new skills and reduce interfering behaviors for students with developmental disabilities. Emphasizes the application of these strategies within public school and collaborative settings. Encourages students to move from theory to practice by participating in a variety of hands-on and real-life activities. Offers students an opportunity to develop the skills necessary in order to write measurable goals and objectives, develop specific treatment and behavioral intervention plans, define and measure behavior, and record and interpret data.

EDU 6620. Politics of Education. 4 Hours.

Designed to explore and analyze the politics of K–12 urban education at the local, state, and federal levels. Urban public schools operate in a political context. Within the schools, there is a web of political relationships that define curriculum, classroom management, and collegial interactions. In the political realities of the community, the municipal system of education and state and national education policy priorities impact local urban schools in both blatant and subtle ways. Emphasizes contemporary issues such as school choice, standardized testing, influence of political interest groups, and urban school reform policy. Offers students an opportunity to explore and develop the skills and strategies necessary to obtain the vision and impetus to be transformative social change agents in urban education.

EDU 6621. Educational Leadership 1. 6 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to engage in study and practical experiences designed to prepare them for the role of school principal. Includes the development of skills and understandings related to leadership development, communication, and school culture. Introduces effective leadership skills including organizational characteristics of schools, school climate, and techniques for facilitating institutional change; team building, consensus building, and group decision-making skills; and principles and techniques of effective human resource management. .

EDU 6622. Educational Leadership 2. 5 Hours.

Introduces aspiring school principals to the examination of effective practices and tools for planning, implementing, evaluating, and revising school priorities, procedures, and programs. Examines effective instructional practices; issues relating to leading and motivating staff, including effective management strategies; supervision and evaluation of instructional programs and data-driven decision making for the improvement of teaching and learning; and fiscal management and budget administration. Explores federal, state, and municipal laws and regulations governing school management. .

EDU 6623. Educational Leadership 3. 5 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to engage in study and practical experiences designed to prepare them for the role of school principal with particular emphasis on an exploration of appropriate instructional methods and on student assessment. Covers issues relating to curriculum development, including scope, sequence, and program evaluation; understanding and use of principles, practices, and recent research for effective teaching, learning, and curriculum development; understanding of human development and learning of children and adults; and understanding theories and methods of program evaluation. Also addresses the culture and climate of the school. .

EDU 6624. Educational Leadership 4. 5 Hours.

Designed for the preparation of school leaders. Explores strategies concerning school operation, parent involvement, and the wider community. Topics include understanding societal change; the process of policy formation at the local, state, and federal levels and how to effectively use the political process for school change; and the historical and political backgrounds of the major gender, racial, ethnic, religious, and cultural groups in a school district. Discusses the results of contemporary research as it relates to the delivery of effective services for students with special needs. Students are expected to develop their own personal professional development plan.

EDU 6625. Educational Leadership Seminar. 3 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to explore effective communication; interpersonal attitudes and skills; personnel management and labor relations, including conflict resolution, mediation, and negotiation; and the culture and climate of the school. .

EDU 6626. Positive Behavior Support for At-Risk Students: Strategies and Interventions. 2 Hours.

Builds from knowledge about functional behavioral assessments. Reviews research and best practices for providing additional support for students who are at risk for developing serious or chronic problem behavior. Explores various programs and specialized group interventions that emphasize prevention and teaching with emphasis on developing and implementing behavior management plans.

EDU 6627. Implementing Effective Classroom and Schoolwide Behavior Support for All Students. 2 Hours.

Examines patterns of problem behavior and findings through a systems approach. Explores ways to design and implement classroom and schoolwide supports to create a positive, inclusive school culture and climate. Discusses problem-solving strategies with the understanding that each school has its own unique characteristics and that there is no universal approach to establishing effective behavior supports.

EDU 6628. Demystifying Functional Behavioral Assessments: Positive Behavior Support at the Individual Level. 2 Hours.

Introduces functional behavioral assessment (FBA) and its use as a tool to support behavior management initiatives in the special education classroom. Examines evidence-based strategies for conducting an FBA and strategies to effectively use the results to design and implement positive behavior support plans.

EDU 6630. Educational Leadership—Creating a Culture for Learning. 3 Hours.

Designed to assist aspiring principals to (a) rethink and redefine school leadership so that the job is doable and (b) redesign their schools so that virtually all students achieve high levels of proficiency. Students engage in text-based discussions designed to help them identify and assess the contextual factors in which they work that influence their leadership practice, foster the improvement of teaching and learning, and produce results, as well as those that inhibit the improvement of teaching and learning. Analyzes strategies for building an infrastructure that promotes collective inquiry, teamwork, and distributive leadership. Offers students an opportunity to learn how to implement a leadership framework to guide, direct, and support the schoolwide, continuous improvement of standards-based teaching and learning and the conditions in which they occur.

EDU 6631. Curriculum Leadership. 3 Hours.

Offers participants an opportunity to learn strategies for framing curriculum-related problems and planning curriculum changes. Major topics include the relationship between standards-based education and previous curriculum traditions and theories; student, teacher, and school factors that influence curriculum experiences; the differences between contrived and genuine collaboration for curriculum planning and curriculum improvement; and the use of assessment and data to improve curriculum and learning.

EDU 6632. Inclusive Elementary Schools: Curriculum, Instruction in Mathematics, and Other Disciplines. 2,4 Hours.

Designed to engage students in understanding the big ideas of elementary subject matter while examining state standards and curriculum frameworks. Major components include knowledge and application of instruction in mathematics and the use of instructional programs from students’ districts. Offers students an opportunity to design units of study incorporating math and other subject areas with differentiated lessons and assessments.

EDU 6633. Inclusive Secondary Schools: Curriculum, Instruction in the Disciplines. 2,4 Hours.

Designed to engage students in understanding the big ideas of secondary subject matter while examining state standards and curriculum frameworks. Major components include knowledge and application of instructional strategies for each discipline. Offers students an opportunity to design units of study incorporating curriculum frameworks, differentiated lessons, and assessments.

EDU 6635. Building School Capacity for Providing Behavioral Health Services. 4 Hours.

Designed for school health professionals. Offers an opportunity to explore topics related to children and adolescents with mental and behavioral issues. Addresses the basic competencies needed to provide mental and behavioral health services in the school environment, including awareness of prevention strategies and knowledge of a variety of mental health disorders. Covers information about partnering with families, school personnel, and community mental health specialists to assess, plan, and provide care, including the use of interpersonal communication skills to meet the needs of students.

EDU 6640. Seminar Series: Excellence in School Leadership 1. 2 Hours.

Offers the first seminar in the series, designed to provide participants with both the conceptual framework for their leadership development work and two intensive workshops in key areas: (a) school law and (b) leadership in special education. This seminar is launched with an institute orientation where opportunities for team building and for mapping the year’s activities are presented. During this seminar, mentors and district-based personnel assist the aspiring leader in identifying key projects and activities to frame the practicum content. This intensive workshop features knowledgeable presenters in their respective areas, key readings, and activities and protocols that seek to enable participants to deepen their understanding of leadership challenges and practice-based dilemmas.

EDU 6641. Seminar Series: Excellence in School Leadership 2. 1 Hour.

Offers the second seminar in the series, designed to provide participants with both the conceptual framework for their leadership development work and the first in two intensive workshops in instructional leadership. Focuses on the establishment of a knowledge base and daily routines that support leaders in their supervision and evaluation of teachers and in establishing a positive, goal-oriented culture. Introduces key readings, activities, and protocols that seek to enable participants to deepen their understanding of leadership challenges and practice-based dilemmas in instructional leadership.

EDU 6642. Seminar Series: Excellence in School Leadership 3. 1 Hour.

Offers the third and concluding seminar in the series, designed to provide participants with both the conceptual framework for their leadership development work and the last of the intensive workshops in instructional leadership. Features knowledgeable presenters in their respective areas, key readings, and activities and protocols that seek to enable participants to deepen their understanding of leadership challenges and practice-based dilemmas in instructional leadership. Emphasizes the use of field notes, claims, and evidence and working with teachers in key domains of practice.

EDU 6645. Adapting Secondary Curriculum for the Online Delivery. 3 Hours.

Designed for classroom teachers. Focuses on the adaptation of secondary school curriculum to an online delivery format using best practices and proven methodologies. Offers participants an opportunity to demonstrate prior learning in the design of their own online courses based on the practical application of the theory explored in earlier courses. They also have an opportunity to adapt guidelines for competency-based teaching and learning to their online delivery and to apply a variety of learning accessories designed to meet the needs of online learners in a high school setting.

EDU 6646. Establishing a Student Support Framework. 3 Hours.

Focuses on establishing a framework for implementing online programs in a secondary school setting to ensure high-quality teaching and learning, faculty and student satisfaction, and demonstrated student success. Designed to help participants identify strategies that include addressing student and faculty expectations for online teaching and learning, creating a community of learners, and setting up a student support structure such as peer coaching, academic advising, technical support, and working in study groups. Seeks to familiarize participants with proven strategies and best practices for developing student support services for online learners at the secondary school level.

EDU 6648. Writing Instruction for Effective Communication. 4 Hours.

Focuses on instructional practices that teachers can use to support students as they develop their writing skills. Presents participants with ways to integrate the components of writing, the writing process, writing in the content area, and the different modes and genres of writing. New learning tools include learning strategies, instructional methods and materials, and evaluation techniques. Offers participants an opportunity to demonstrate their knowledge of the reading-writing connection. The course also addresses research and practice relative to the principles of teaching writing.

EDU 6655. Enhancing Clinical Skills and Empowering School Nurses. 3 Hours.

Designed to meet the clinical needs of K–12 school nurses. Topics include school-wide issues such as nutrition fads, access to behavior and health resources, and ethical issues. Explores strategies for dealing with bullying, assessing anxiety, respiratory and trauma emergencies, and drug impairment issues. Participants are updated on the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education reporting requirements. Also provides participants with an opportunity to consider their role as the health leader in their school.

EDU 6656. Accountability in Public Education 1. 2 Hours.

Designed primarily for administrators responsible for running schools and school systems and for policy makers responsible for setting, overseeing, and evaluating the implementation of public policy in the field of education. Explores various approaches to public accountability in general and the history and current context of contemporary public education accountability, including increasing demands for public accountability, improved performance, and reform. Also examines concepts of performance measurement, ethics in accountability work, and current practice in educational accountability.

EDU 6657. Accountability in Public Education 2. 2 Hours.

Designed for administrators responsible for running schools and school systems and for policy makers responsible for setting, overseeing, and evaluating the implementation of public policy in the field of education. Offers participants an opportunity to explore the application of concepts studied in EDU 6656 in the context of State Frameworks for District and School Accountability. In addition, participants have an opportunity to examine and practice some of the specific knowledge and skills required to perform accountability reviews of the performance of schools or school districts. Includes process elements, assessment of personal attributes, case study, fieldwork, and simulation and role-playing.

EDU 6665. Best Practices for Serving Students with Severe Disabilities across School Settings. 4 Hours.

Explores some of the best practices in serving students with more complex academic and social needs, including those with physical, communication, developmental, and suspected intellectual impairments. Examines ways to increase access to high-quality academic and functional content through the use of universal and individually designed accommodations and modifications to both the explicit content as well as the embedded curriculum. Emphasizes the development of language systems, the use of aided language stimulation, and the functionality of core vocabulary. Reviews the current application of pragmatically organized dynamic displays (PODD systems), focusing on the broader implications in the future. Addresses the development of literacy and numeracy skills through the review of instructional practices, systematically layered content, and effective accommodations.

EDU 6670. Understanding and Addressing Needs of Students with Social Cognitive Deficits. 4 Hours.

Offers a hands-on/interactive course designed to provide participants with a basis for understanding the social and cognitive deficits in students diagnosed with high-functioning autism, pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS), Asperger syndrome, nonverbal learning disability, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), as well as the challenges these conditions present both in and out of the classroom. Analyzes social thinking as described in the work of Michelle Garcia Winner. Offers participants functional treatment strategies and an opportunity to better understand why these students react and respond the way they do. Examines available social skills assessment tools and resources designed to assist in developing and implementing social thinking curriculum. Also covers instruction in how to write individual education plan (IEP) goals and objectives.

EDU 6710. Understanding Autism Spectrum Disorders. 4 Hours.

Explores the unique characteristics of students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), including impairments in language, social skills, sensory processing, and behavioral regulation. Offers detailed information on the current research and media trends in the following areas: diagnostic classification of autism, Asperger syndrome, Rett syndrome, childhood disintegrative disorder, and pervasive development disorder-NOS. Examines intervention strategies applicable to both regular and special education classrooms with particular emphasis on best practices and evidence-based interventions.

EDU 6866. Teaching Practicum and Seminar. 1-8 Hours.

Includes at least 300 hours of supervised student teaching in a public school system and reflection seminar. Provides a field-based assessment of teaching performance for students in one of the MAT programs. Requires prior successful completion of all Commonwealth of Massachusetts licensure prerequisites. May be repeated for up to 8 total credits.

EDU 6870. Teacher Candidate Practicum. 1 Hour.

Seeks to support the development of effective, culturally responsive teachers throughout the yearlong licensure program. Various components of this course are designed to be a conduit for ongoing reflection and refinement of practice, incorporating problem-solving strategies, examining assumptions, applying theory to practice, and analyzing student outcomes as a means of improving practice. A major goal is to create a collegial learning community that promotes honesty, reflection, risk taking, and intellectual rigor. Teacher practice is recorded, self- and peer-evaluated, and supervised by a licensed teacher.

EDU 6874. Practicum, Portfolio, and Panel Review. 4 Hours.

Contains both a portfolio requirement and a panel review in addition to a supervised practicum. The portfolio that is submitted includes work products demonstrating the competencies specified in the Professional Standards for Teachers. The review panel is composed of School of Education faculty members, a partner-school special educator/administrator, and community members. Requires students to present a video and/or portfolio in which they demonstrate competencies. .

EDU 6961. Internship. 1-4 Hours.

Provides students with an opportunity for internship work. May be repeated without limit.

EDU 6962. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions. May be repeated without limit.

EDU 6964. Co-op. 0 Hours.

Provides eligible students with an opportunity for work experience.

EDU 6966. Practicum. 1-4 Hours.

Offers students a field-based, supervised practicum in two levels of school--elementary, middle, and/or high school. Students are assigned responsibilities and keep the schedule of a full-time teacher. They have an opportunity to collaborate with their supervising practitioner as well as other professionals to infuse technology into instruction and practice. They also have an opportunity to work with the administrators at the schools to create and deliver a professional development workshop in instructional technology for their peers. Exposes students to guidance, IEPs, budgeting, long-term planning, and technology infrastructure. Offers students the opportunity to complete a professional portfolio on their own Web site for viewing by potential employers.

EDU 6970. Seminar. 1-4 Hours.

Integrates a seminar and laboratory format across courses throughout the program. Covers introductory diagnostic seminar, school-site meetings, mentoring, and the year-long team project.

EDU 6976. Directed Study. 3 Hours.

Offers independent work under the direction of members of the department on a chosen topic.

EDU 6980. Interdisciplinary Capstone. 2 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to act as reflective change agents as they apply the knowledge and skills gained from their individualized programs of study to the creation of a final project, an action research proposal. The proposal, presented to faculty and peers, identifies a workplace problem or need and includes an implementation plan to address it. Students also have an opportunity to reflect on their learning journey and to refine their original Professional Learning Plan (PLP) with a five-year focus.

EDU 6983. Topics. 1-4 Hours.

Covers special topics in education. May be repeated without limit.

EDU 6995. Project. 1-4 Hours.

Focuses on in-depth project in which a student conducts research or produces a product related to the student’s major field. May be repeated without limit.

EDU 7101. Analytical Thinking and Writing for Scholarship and Reflective Practice. 6 Hours.

Introduces the analytical, academic, writing, and research skills needed for successful completion of the doctoral degree. Reviews and outlines doctoral-level scholarship and applies critical-thinking methodologies to research and writing. Doctoral study involves a different approach to thinking and writing through critical analysis, synthesis of ideas and facts, and the use of theory in its relation to professional practice. Specific topics include understanding of critical and abstract thinking, intersecting theoretical frameworks with practice, argumentation development, and the conceptualization and organization of scholarly discourse. Students are expected to complete intensive writing assignments each week of the course.

EDU 7102. Augmentative and Alternative Communication within the Inclusion Setting. 4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to look at how augmentative and alternative communication systems can be used to support literacy, composition, and access to the curriculum through modified formats. Covers basic language development through alternative means, from very concrete representations to advanced computerized communication devices. Examines students with both moderate and severe disabilities who require a range of supports, including both high- and low-tech systems. Also addresses access issues related to physical, vision, and hearing impairments. Many of the techniques and strategies reviewed are useful for English-language learners as well as native speakers.

EDU 7103. Building a Healthy, Inclusive School Community. 2 Hours.

Focuses on effectively communicating and building positive relationships with students, parents, and colleagues, particularly in diverse schools and schools with changing demographics. Offers students an opportunity to learn to apply a model of interpersonal relationships that addresses development of biases and expectations that interfere with school climate, learning, and interpersonal effectiveness. Examines how the development of racial groupings and cliques undermines a school’s morale and functioning and what to do when this occurs.

EDU 7105. Advanced Topics in Elementary Literacy Development. 4 Hours.

Provides an overview of the reader’s and writer’s workshop models of instruction. Topics include running records, word study strategies for developing vocabulary, and guided reading instruction. Explores strategies for developing fluency and comprehension. In addition, offers students an opportunity to investigate the concepts of process and content writing, the writer’s notebook, using mentor texts for teaching the six traits of writing, and to analyze assessment tools and student work samples to inform the educator and ultimately drive instruction.

EDU 7165. Leadership and Vision. 6 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to examine issues as they relate to theories of organizational development, leadership, school culture, and vision. Topics include why certain organizations and change efforts succeed; ways to implement successful strategies to transform schools and achieve goals of social justice and high achievement for all students that includes members of the school community; characteristics of a leader; how school leaders can keep students and their families at the center of the work; the role of the community in building schools, developing curriculum, and in the leadership model of the school.

EDU 7166. Body, Mind, and Meaning. 4 Hours.

Considers the interaction between experience, memory, imagery, and the body. Is the body experienced as a machine, as spirit made flesh, as manifestation of mind? Where is the mind located? Where is the body experienced? Ida Rolf taught that memories are in our muscles, and Candace Pert has found emotions in our bodies’ neuropeptides. Through theoretical readings and discussion, as well as experiential exercises, this course provides educators, body workers, and psychotherapists with an introduction to the field of somatic psychology.

EDU 7200. Social and Cultural Analysis of Education Systems. 3 Hours.

Presents institutional, cultural, and social dynamics of schooling, classroom management, school reform, and social group interactions, as well as individual role behaviors.

EDU 7201. Global and Historical Perspectives on Education. 3 Hours.

Provides a historical foundation for understanding how global educational trends of today have been informed by ideas and practices from the past. Compares seminal theories of teaching and learning, benchmarks in the evolution of schooling, and changing notions about the purposes of education cross-culturally over time. Offers students an opportunity to gain a more sophisticated perspective on today’s changing landscape in K–12 and higher education across the world.

EDU 7202. Transforming Human Systems. 3 Hours.

Focuses on the many challenges presented by today’s dynamic environment and examines change processes as they relate to various organizational settings. Emphasizes the usefulness of theory and research, in addition to management and leadership practice techniques, that facilitate effective change and transformation efforts. Underscores the planning process as it relates to institutional change and transformation. Offers students an opportunity to analyze both empirical research and case studies and to use theoretical research to examine real-world examples of change and transformation.

EDU 7203. Ethical Decision Making for Education Leaders. 3 Hours.

Considers the conflicts that can arise when pressures placed on educators and educational leaders, and the actions that result, are in conflict with the rights and well-being of teachers, learners, and their communities. Examines actions educational leaders have taken and the consequences they have faced when confronted with ethical dilemmas. Develops a personal model for ethical leadership from these examinations. Uses case studies and documents based on current events.

EDU 7204. Global and Historical Perspectives on Higher Education. 3 Hours.

Provides a historical foundation for understanding how current trends in higher education are informed by ideas and practices from the past. Compares seminal theories of teaching and learning, benchmarks in the evolution of higher education, and changing notions about the purposes of higher education cross-culturally over time. Offers students an opportunity to gain a more sophisticated perspective on today’s changing landscape in higher education across the world.

EDU 7205. Research Processes. 3 Hours.

Introduces practice-based educational research. Drawing upon the reflective examination of their professional field conducted in previous courses, students are guided through the process of crafting good research questions to investigate problems of practice of their interest and explore the characteristics and possibilities of quantitative and qualitative approaches to the questions they crafted. Explores different types of research design specially suited to bridge research and practice (e.g., action research, case studies, evaluation studies, survey studies). Offers students an opportunity to identify the type of practice-based research that is most adequate to investigate their questions.

EDU 7208. Theoretical Foundations of Education Research and Practice. 3 Hours.

Introduces the role theoretical frameworks play in practice-based research. Covers foundational theories in educational research and how these theories have been used to understand problems of practice in varied K–12 and/or higher educational settings. Through the instructor’s guidance, offers students an opportunity to begin to research and select a theoretical framework that best matches their own research interests. Students draft their own doctoral problem statement (DPS) as a culminating project for the course.

EDU 7209. Introduction to Doctoral Studies. 3 Hours.

Seeks to provide a foundation for further study in the Northeastern University Doctor of Education program. Examines doctoral studies, resources, philosophical issues, and basics of research. Offers students an opportunity to integrate theoretical and scholarly knowledge in the development of a researchable problem of practice.

EDU 7210. Leadership Theory and Research. 3 Hours.

Examines seminal works, contemporary theories and models, and emerging perspectives of educational leadership. Exposes students to the ways in which educational leadership has been conceptualized, explores how it is currently defined and analyzed, and discusses how it will be shaped in the future. Adopts a cross-disciplinary and integrative view of the leadership phenomenon that highlights how different disciplines inform leadership study and illustrates various research methodologies used for understanding and assessing the concept of leadership. Covers a range of leadership processes (e.g., individual, dyadic, group, organizational) along with theoretical perspectives (e.g., trait, behavioral, contingency, change and transformation).

EDU 7211. Public and Institutional Policy. 3 Hours.

Examines those issues that impact how education institutions operate and their effectiveness. Educational institutions operate in a political context. Within the schools there is a web of political relationships that define curriculum, classroom management, and collegial interactions. Outside the school, the political realities of the community in which education institutions sit and the municipal, state, and national education policy priorities impact the school. Emphasizes the skills and understanding necessary for education leaders to navigate and influence this political environment.

EDU 7212. Financial Decision Making for Education Leaders. 3 Hours.

Explores financial aspects of educational institutions with particular emphasis on the use of financial information for decision making. Specific topics include financial analysis, budget creation, and budget oversight. Examines both cost center and RCM models. Emphasizes using financial data for decisions related to resource allocation, forecasting, and other planning and control activities.

EDU 7213. Education Entrepreneurship. 3 Hours.

Examines entrepreneurship and innovation from the perspective of the educational leader and uses case studies to demonstrate entrepreneurial success within the education environment. Education leaders, whether in public or private institutions, need to be innovators, capable of facilitating, generating, and advancing new ideas and initiatives. Current and emerging challenges within the education environment require going beyond the solutions and leadership practices of the past.

EDU 7214. Changing Conceptions of Learning and Human Development: Research and Practice. 3 Hours.

Examines how interdisciplinary fields in the social sciences and the humanities provide frameworks for thinking about changing conceptions of learning and human development at the levels of the individual, the individual in relationship with others, and the individual in varied social contexts. Close examination of primary source readings offers students an opportunity to investigate the ways these ideas have influenced educational research and practice. Requires students to deeply reflect about how conceptions of learning and human development matter when designing and conducting their own doctoral research.

EDU 7215. Understanding Qualitative and Quantitative Research Data. 3 Hours.

Investigates further the assumptions that underlie quantitative and qualitative research approaches introduced in EDU 7205. Explores the tools and methods most commonly associated with different research approaches, the data that they produce, and the various processes used in analyzing different types of data. Also provides an introduction to research design by connecting research questions to methodology, methodology to methods, methods to the resulting data, and data to the appropriate analytical approaches. In preparation for the methodological component of the doctoral project proposal (DPP), offers students an opportunity to gain a clearer understanding of methodology and the different approaches that scholars have used to investigate their area of interest.

EDU 7216. Social Justice and Educational Equity. 3 Hours.

Explores how conceptions of justice and oppression have evolved in the United States. Offers students an opportunity to examine seminal texts, analyze contemporary educational research, and explore and analyze how social justice issues inform and contribute to problems of practice in contemporary educational contexts. Instructors employ a variety of pedagogical strategies to facilitate independent and collaborative learning.

EDU 7217. Educational Systems: The Dynamics between Policy, Values, and Practice. 3 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to analyze education systems—macro to micro—using a wide array of resources and learning experiences. Public school systems have been shaped by numerous policies and legislated expectations as well as by political and social arguments, values, and beliefs. Many of these forces greatly affect the structures, organization, practices, and cultures of districts, schools, and classrooms today.

EDU 7220. Creating High-Performance Teams. 3 Hours.

Examines group dynamics and the techniques of leading teams, while offering students the opportunity to observe and practice leading team-based activities. Education institutions depend upon collaboration and team efforts to effectively fulfill their missions. Leading teams involves managing different personalities, cultures, conflicting political agendas, and varying skill levels, while simultaneously securing and managing resources and managing the expectations of other stakeholders.

EDU 7221. Negotiation, Mediation, and Arbitration. 3 Hours.

Introduces several of the techniques of dispute resolution, with application to both internal and external situations. Emphasizes human-resource-related disputes, including those related to disciplinary situations and collective bargaining agreements. Examines various options along with rubrics that can be used for decision making in the context of dispute resolution.

EDU 7222. Community Engagement. 3 Hours.

Defines and analyzes the multiple stakeholders that comprise the community and the many agendas that must be balanced and managed. Educational institutions at all levels are integral parts of the communities they reside in and serve. Education leaders must not only manage the relationship between their institutions and their communities, but they also need to be participants in the life of those communities. Examines specific examples of effective and ineffective community engagement, along with national and international trends.

EDU 7223. Communication Challenges for Education Leaders. 3 Hours.

Covers crisis communication, intercultural communication, and communicating with the media. Education leaders operate within extremely diverse environments, in which communication challenges frequently arise. In addition to internal challenges, education leaders must also be prepared to represent their institutions to the media, the general public, and government agencies.

EDU 7224. Doctoral Seminar in Education Leadership. 3 Hours.

Offers a special topics course that examines critical and timely issues challenging education leaders. Through individual consultations with the instructor and critical feedback from their peers, offers students an opportunity to focus their thesis arguments and articulate how their projects contribute to applied research in the field of education leadership.

EDU 7230. Current and Emerging Practice in STEM Education. 3 Hours.

Examines standards-based curricula in current use and under development in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education in grades K–12. Focuses on the capacity of these curricula to promote scientific literacy and facilitate conceptual understanding of scientific principles through guided inquiry and other modes of instruction. Explores curricula that develop and apply mathematical skills to solving significant scientific problems. Analyzes the fidelity of implementing these standards and their impact on student learning as measured by national and international tests, including TIMSS and PISA.

EDU 7231. National and International Benchmarks. 3 Hours.

Examines science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education standards that have been set by national organizations, including the AAAS and National Academies, and by state agencies, including the Massachusetts DOE Curriculum Frameworks in Mathematics and in Science and Technology. Compares and contrasts the learning goals embedded in these standards with contents of standardized tests administered locally, nationally, and internationally. Explores how to help educators embrace collaborative globalization in STEM education.

EDU 7232. Linking Theory and Practice through Partnerships. 3 Hours.

Examines the effectiveness of school-to-work, dual enrollment, summer bridge, after school, cyber learning, and other STEM education enhancements that are jointly administered by middle and high schools in concert with corporate, higher education, and other nonprofit partners. Uses case studies and a critical review of the literature to offer educators an opportunity to explore how such partnerships can lead to richer student learning and a better understanding of, and appreciation for, the contributions of STEM professionals.

EDU 7233. Knowledge and Critical Skill Integration. 3 Hours.

Explores recent trends in rebalancing emphasis on the acquisition of content knowledge with process skill development in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education in grades 6–12. Examines the results of research on teaching and learning that probe the efficacy of “process” education as an approach to acquiring knowledge, developing high-order learning skills, and inspiring students to take ownership of their learning and growth.

EDU 7240. Curriculum Design and Dissemination. 3 Hours.

Explores theoretical and historical dimensions of the design and dissemination of curricula in K–12 educational settings. Examines overarching principles that run through all subject-based curricula. Explores both historical and contemporary case studies of how key components of curriculum leadership have been operationalized in various school settings.

EDU 7241. International Research and Practices in Curricula. 3 Hours.

Examines international research and practices in the field of curriculum and instruction. The course’s theoretical framework serves as an investigative lens into key tensions that have framed past and current-day developments in curriculum and instruction. Offers students an opportunity to explore each of these tensions in a variety of international educational settings. Working in collaborative teams, they then have an opportunity to build upon this knowledge to develop their own research and analysis of a case study in curriculum and instruction.

EDU 7242. Situated Leadership. 3 Hours.

Focuses on student reflections on the challenges and opportunities they face as educational leaders and change agents in contemporary educational settings. Is theory driven. Offers students an opportunity to investigate various theoretical frameworks and apply them to their various problems of practice; to investigate, gather, and synthesize empirical research articles that pertain to their particular areas of interest; to write cogent literature reviews detailing their analysis; and to present and debate their ideas with classmates.

EDU 7243. Doctoral Seminar in Curriculum Leadership. 3 Hours.

Offers a special topics course that examines critical and timely issues challenging curriculum leaders. Through individual consultations with the instructor and critical feedback from their peers, offers students an opportunity to explore these topics and discuss how they relate to applied research in the field of curriculum leadership.

EDU 7244. Curriculum Theory and Practice Over Time: Implications for Educational Leadership. 3 Hours.

Explores the theoretical and historical dimensions of curriculum, teaching, and learning in varied educational settings. Offers students an opportunity to learn about touchstone principles that have shaped the thinking and implementation of subject-based curricula over time. Uses historical and contemporary case studies to examine how educational leadership is intimately connected to the process of curriculum development, teaching, and learning.

EDU 7245. Urban Education. 3 Hours.

Focuses on the historical and contemporary challenges and possibilities that urban public schools face. Encourages students to consider the urban school from desegregation post–Brown vs. the Board of Education through current resegregation, high-stakes testing, and education reform. Through analysis and critical thinking, offers students an opportunity to create their own research-based plans to address a critical issue in urban schools.

EDU 7250. Organizational Systems and Institutional Governance. 3 Hours.

Examines the issues related to shared governance. Focuses on managing and leading in an environment of shared governance. Institutions of higher education are unlike any other kind of institutions in either the public or private sector. The difference is largely due to the concept and use of shared governance. Other topics include variations of shared governance and organizational structures.

EDU 7251. Student Engagement in Higher Education. 3 Hours.

Examines influential student development theories and theorists. The higher education sector in the United States and around the world is being transformed by competitive forces that require institutions to be market-driven. Analyzes the implications of work on enrollment management and students in a market-driven environment.

EDU 7252. Fundraising, Alumni, and Development. 3 Hours.

Focuses on activities related to foundations, alumni, grants, and donors. Higher education leaders must serve and lead many constituencies external to the institution. Examines specific development strategies, as well as development and relationship techniques and models.

EDU 7253. The Legal Environment of Higher Education. 3 Hours.

Examines the major laws that impact the decision making of higher education leaders and emphasizes strategies for navigating the legal environment and managing potential legal threats. Institutions of higher education operate in a complex legal environment that includes laws related to financial aid, admissions, licensure, and privacy.

EDU 7254. Postsecondary and Institutional Public Policy. 3 Hours.

Examines the political contexts within which institutions of higher education operate, including the influences of various interest groups—faculty, students, parents, community groups, alumni, trustees, and central administrators. Explores the additional factors affecting public institutions, including state and national education policy resource allocation priorities. Emphasizes development of the skills and understandings necessary for education leaders to navigate and manipulate a range of political environments.

EDU 7255. Innovation and Entrepreneurship in Higher Education. 3 Hours.

Examines entrepreneurship and innovation from the higher education perspective and uses case studies to examine the reasons for entrepreneurial successes and failures. Effective leaders of higher education institutions must be accomplished innovators, capable of facilitating, generating, and advancing new ideas and initiatives. Current and emerging challenges within the higher education environment require going beyond the solutions and leadership practices of the past.

EDU 7256. Financial Decision Making in Higher Education. 3 Hours.

Explores financial aspects of postsecondary educational institutions with particular emphasis on the use of financial information for decision making. Specific topics include financial analysis, budget creation, and budget oversight. Examines both cost-center and RCM models. Emphasizes using financial data for decisions related to resource allocation, forecasting, and other planning and control activities in higher education.

EDU 7257. The Urban University in the United States. 3 Hours.

Explores the development and special characteristics of the urban university in the United States. Includes an introductory session focused on the meaning of the term “urban university” and the societal importance of this type of institution, a sequence of historically oriented classes that explore the emergence and evolution of different types of urban universities from the late-nineteenth century to the present, a sequence of topically oriented classes that focus on various aspects of urban universities in terms of both their internal characteristics and their relationships with their surrounding communities, and a view of selected urban universities in the United States.

EDU 7258. Strategic Management in Higher Education. 3 Hours.

Examines strategic management from multiple conceptual and intellectual traditions. Focuses on the latest research and situates strategic management within the context of higher education.

EDU 7259. Doctoral Seminar in Higher Education Administration. 3 Hours.

Offers a special topics course that examines critical and timely issues challenging postsecondary leaders. Through individual consultations with the instructor and critical feedback from their peers, this course offers students an opportunity to explore these topics and discuss how they relate to applied research in the field of higher education administration.

EDU 7260. Comparative International/Global Higher Education. 3 Hours.

Examines the many educational systems that exist around the world, along with worldwide emerging trends in education. An understanding of these global models can better inform policy decisions, institutional strategies, and pedagogy at the micro- and macrolevels. Emphasizes topics of governance, credentialing, assessment, portability, funding, curriculum, and instruction. Examines current and emerging trends resulting from changing demographic and economic shifts, as well as varied reform initiatives.

EDU 7261. International Student Markets. 3 Hours.

Examines the characteristics and drivers that influence the needs and interests of various student markets, as well as current strategies being employed domestically and internationally to recruit and retain international students. International students have become a major factor in education markets that include specialized preparatory schools to major research universities. Many schools have relied on international students, who generally pay full tuition, to meet tuition revenue targets. As the world economy continues to globalize, and the importance of knowledge-driven industries expands, the importance of understanding and competing in global education markets continues to increase.

EDU 7262. Collaborations and Partnerships. 3 Hours.

Examines the many types of collaborations and partnerships available to institutions and explores the factors that influence success. As governments increasingly seek to internationalize their citizenry and students seek out international opportunities, international and global collaborations are becoming more commonplace. However, these collaborations can vary greatly, as can the results. Other topics include international negotiation, institutional compatibility, financial models, curriculum design, calendar variations, accreditation issues, and harmonization.

EDU 7263. International Education Law. 3 Hours.

Examines issues of intellectual property, homeland security, industry protectionism, academic freedom, student rights, and general reporting requirements as they relate to institutions operating domestically or globally. Operating across borders, whether offering programs or simply recruiting students, can introduce a complex layer of legal issues. Other topics include employer obligations, licensing requirements, and risk management.

EDU 7264. Educating Global Students: Issues and Practices. 3 Hours.

Examines higher education issues of quality, assessment, outcomes, faculty development, use of adjunct faculty, etc., which are intensified in transnational delivery. Transnational higher education (i.e., international education), typically defined as the mobility of higher education students and programs across countries, is not only a growing educative approach broadening world views and increasing access but is also seen as entrance to new student markets. The growth of transnational higher education brings opportunities and presents challenges.

EDU 7266. Contemporary Issues in Community Colleges. 3 Hours.

Examines contemporary issues facing community college administration, including promoting equity, open access, diversity and affirmative action, transfer policies, workforce development, and developmental education.

EDU 7267. Community College and Learning Communities. 3 Hours.

Examines the challenges of creating learning-centered community colleges. Focuses on creating a climate for learning, designing for inquiry, virtual collaboration and reflective dialogue, and faculty development.

EDU 7268. Community College Leadership. 3 Hours.

Examines the process that makes effective leaders in community colleges. Focuses on collaborative leadership, shared governance, working with internal campus committees, and working with external communities.

EDU 7269. Leadership in Higher Education: The College Presidency. 3 Hours.

Focuses on the special characteristics of the presidency in four-year colleges and universities. Structured around the three basic roles of the president—leader, manager, policymaker—uses case studies to illustrate the challenges of each. Considers views of the presidency by scholars and practitioner-observers and includes the experience of the presidency as described in the memoirs of former presidents. The premise of the course is that the presidency is a uniquely complex position, indispensable to the effective functioning of colleges and universities and subject to many different approaches depending on institutional needs and individual characteristics. Stresses the idea of the scholar-practitioner as a central element of effectiveness in each of the three critical roles.

EDU 7270. Leadership and Communication: Challenges and Interdependencies . 3 Hours.

Reviews the literature on organizational communication and examines contemporary cases relating to leadership and communication. Organizational success depends on effective internal and external communication. In large part, leaders influence communication behavior in organizations and can affect the credibility of formal communication networks, communication behavior during crises, organizational culture, the extent to which honesty is characteristic of employee interaction, and even the prevalence of the organizational grapevine. While leaders can affect organizational communication, communication proficiency can also affect the perceptions of leadership quality. Deficiencies in communication, regardless of administrative wisdom, can render the most brilliant individual an ineffective leader. Requires students to analyze their own organizations in terms of leadership and communication and to develop a communication plan for effective leadership.

EDU 7271. Information and Communication: Social and Conventional Networks . 3 Hours.

Examines the relationship between new technology and conventional networks for effective internal and external organizational communication for today’s leaders. Developing such relationships, which have been changed by new and evolving technology, is a leadership responsibility. Social networks are no longer informal but have become part of the prescribed network system of organizations. Understanding the nuances of social media in the twenty-first century is as or more significant than comprehending the chain of command or bureaucracy theories. Requires students to examine their own organizations in terms of the intelligent use of communication technology for information management and to develop a plan for improving communication in their organizations by incorporating social networks with conventional networks for the purposes of efficient information management.

EDU 7272. Global Perspectives of Organizational Culture. 3 Hours.

Examines organizational culture from an interdisciplinary and global perspective. The capability to understand and to interact with different organizational cultures across the world and the skill to build effective local organizational cultures are prerequisites to effective leadership. Examines key models of organizational culture and current research studies with an emphasis on how culture develops and evolves and its relationship to organizational performance. Offers students an opportunity to critique research designs and methodologies used to measure, describe, and understand organizational culture. Students with a deep understanding of organizational culture become empowered to organize systems, symbols, and people in ways that influence planning, policies, and resource allocations in their organizations.

EDU 7273. Professional Leadership and Communication. 3 Hours.

Focuses on both the analysis of organizational communication and the application and practice of communication strategies for leaders at all levels of the organization. Examines organizational communication—the message, what needs to be communicated and why, and how it should be communicated. Considers the messenger who informs and the organizational meaning-maker who articulates values and vision. Offers students an opportunity to practice and show proficiency in several communication areas: leading and participating in meetings, speaking/giving presentations to large and small audiences, responding to questions in press conference conditions, reducing interpersonal conflict and dealing with difficult personalities, creating collaborative engagement, and facilitating negotiation sessions. Reviews principles and techniques in each area. Uses simulated exercises and coaching to improve skill sets.

EDU 7274. Doctoral Seminar in Organizational Leadership and Communication. 3 Hours.

Examines critical and timely issues challenging education leaders. Uses individual consultations with the instructor and critical feedback from their peers to offer students an opportunity to focus their thesis arguments and articulate how their projects contribute to applied research in the field of organizational leadership and communication. May be repeated up to four times.

EDU 7275. Contemporary Models of Leadership. 3 Hours.

Approaches leadership as a function in social systems, reviewing contemporary perspectives of organizational leadership such as leadership and identity, complexity, shared, and global leadership. Understanding the theory and research underpinning current leadership practice is invaluable knowledge for any organizational leader. Offers students an opportunity to expand, apply, reflect on, and refine their personal leadership knowledge, skills, and abilities to further how they steward their organizations.

EDU 7276. Organizational Communication: Institutional and Global Perspectives. 3 Hours.

Examines the messages, meanings, patterns, and networks of communication, discourse, and symbols as they aid in defining the nature of educational organizations. The study of organizational communication is frequently referred to as the “dynamic interplay between communication processes and human organizing.” Considers selected theoretical approaches and thematic strands in the study of organizational communication: function—the use of communication to accomplish tasks within educational settings; identity and relationship—how the organizations in which we participate affect us; technology—the centrality of social media to organizational networks, both internal and external; and globalization—the opportunities, practices, and responsibilities associated with the global organization.

EDU 7277. Organizational Learning and Systems Thinking. 3 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to compare, contrast, and critique both seminal and modern theories and models of organizational learning and apply them to their own organizational settings. In today’s fast-paced, complex, and interdependent environment, learning must occur constantly in organizations so that knowledge can be created, codified, disseminated, and refined. Leaders must be skilled at creating organizations that sense environmental signals of change to adapt accordingly. This course embraces a systems view of learning at the organizational level of analysis. Course assignments seek to enhance student ability to think systemically and to develop a comprehensive understanding of the core competencies required to create and build cultures of learning in organizations.

EDU 7278. Organization Theory and Design. 3 Hours.

Reviews the organizational design literature, both theory and research, in various settings and focuses on the interaction between the organization and its environment. As we move into a new century, the organizations we work in take on new shapes. The ability to anticipate and create new organizational forms is the mark of a successful leader. Emphasizes organizational theory and the many internal and external factors that cause an organization to fit a particular architecture. Explores classical and modern theories and key organizational design models. Offers students an opportunity to design a forward-thinking organization, creating all components, including vision, mission, strategy, structure, and processes.

EDU 7280. Fundamentals of Research. 3 Hours.

Offers students an overview of all components of a doctoral thesis. Designed to support students’ efforts to hone in on their specific area of research and to write a problem of practice, research questions, and literature review. Offers students feedback on their work from faculty and peers in the course in order to complete a rough draft of the first two chapters of their potential thesis proposal.

EDU 7281. Research Design. 3 Hours.

Focuses on turning a research question into a potential thesis. Emphasizes effective alignment of problem, purpose, question, theory, and method. Offers students an opportunity to examine various qualitative and quantitative research designs and to explore the role of theory in each design. Encourages students to seek to gain a clear understanding of methodology and the different approaches and theories scholars have used to investigate their area of interest. Seeks to guide students through the process of creating a detailed outline that articulates all design components of their theses.

EDU 7282. Quantitative Research. 3 Hours.

Introduces students to a variety of quantitative research designs and the necessary procedures of each design in order for them to conceptualize their doctoral thesis research. Offers students an opportunity to acquire and practice skills in analyzing quantitative data. Students should conclude the course with a conceptual foundation for their doctoral thesis and familiarity with the proposal development process.

EDU 7283. Qualitative Research. 3 Hours.

Introduces students to a variety of methodological approaches in order for them to conceptualize their doctoral thesis research from the perspective of multiple qualitative perspectives. Students conduct a field project with the goal of gaining skills in collecting and analyzing data. Students should conclude the research series with a conceptual foundation for their doctoral thesis and familiarity with the proposal development process.

EDU 7284. Research Regional Seminar: Educational Research Ethics. 3 Hours.

Introduces ideas, legalities, and complex issues that are central to the ethics of educational research, with special emphasis on issues relevant to the Southeast region. Explores unethical research behavior that is obvious and also covers research misconduct involving principles and practices that are less easy to recognize and defend. Learning to become a responsible and successful researcher can be complicated and intellectually challenging. Being a participatory researcher within one’s specific region adds another layer of complexity to the researcher’s role and responsibility. This course is based on case studies in which there are complex and sophisticated research paradigms. Assesses and explores with a critical lens each case study to reach a higher level of nuanced understanding of the ethics in research.

EDU 7285. Research Regional Seminar: Educational Research in Regional Perspective. 3 Hours.

Designed with a focus on the collective audit of regional needs, enabling the faculty and graduate students to be involved in a broad range of community-oriented research issues in the Southeast region. Focuses on the complex economic, social, political, and educational characteristics of this region, using it as a laboratory that pedagogically links teaching, research, and service. The course is positioned around the theoretical and applied analysis of the Southeast metropolitan areas and their broader regional, national, and global contexts.

EDU 7286. Research Regional Seminar: Educational Research Design in a Postmodern World. 3 Hours.

Examines a problem of practice; the literature review associated with it; and the practice of collecting data, within the context of the Southeast region, as scholar-practitioners in a postmodern society. Explores the understandings in the Southeast region around assumptions and beliefs in education; notions of rationality, modernism, and postmodernism; the validation of value judgments; relations with future generations; multiculturalism and gender justice in democratic societies; and their impact on the review of, formulation of, and conduct of research design.

EDU 7287. Faith-Based Education in Democratic Society. 3 Hours.

Addresses the changes in the relationships between faith-based communities and democratic society as they are played out in public and private educational contexts. Emphasizes political, sociological, and historical analyses and their implications for contemporary educational leadership. Investigates controversies on forms of public funding for religious education, separation of church and state, Supreme Court decisions, and the relationship between religious communities and public policy.

EDU 7288. Faith, Ethics, and Leadership in Education. 3 Hours.

Examines the nexus between educational leaders’ multiple sources of fidelity in decision making. Focuses on the interplay between norms of specific faith-based communities and traditions on the one hand and ethical principles that cut across differences on the other. Focuses on philosophies of education and their relationships to faith-based educational aspirations. Through ethical inquiry and case studies of religious communities, offers students an opportunity to articulate their own approaches to ethical decision making in faith-based organizations and in pluralist, diverse societal contexts.

EDU 7289. Global Perspectives for Faith-Based Leadership. 3 Hours.

Examines the place of religion, appropriations of religious traditions, and media representations of religious motives in contemporary international conflicts. Analyzes how these appropriations and representations might call for responses that provide deeper understandings of these conflicts and that offer frameworks for education. Religion and global conflict have taken on new (as well as long-standing) associations in recent decades that trouble and challenge educational leaders in public and private, secular and faith-based contexts.

EDU 7290. Contemporary Models of Sports Leadership. 3 Hours.

Reviews contemporary leadership theory and models as applied to the world of sports. Approaches leadership as a function of social systems, emphasizing recent conceptualizations such as distributed leadership, complexity leadership, and global leadership. Offers students an opportunity to expand, apply, reflect on, and refine their personal leadership knowledge, skills, and abilities to further how they steward their sports organizations.

EDU 7291. Personnel Development in Sports Leadership. 3 Hours.

Provides an overview of general personnel development theories, techniques, and tools that are applied to the context of sport. Contrasts development in higher education, nonprofit, and private-sector sport organizations that have athlete and nonathlete members that need to work separately or in concert, including those that play a supportive role to sporting activities. Includes learning and organizing theory. Covers the basics of recruitment, training needs assessment, leading the training function for performance improvement, orienting new employees, helping personnel achieve professional and career goals, managing in-person and virtual teams, making the buy-or-build decisions, promoting diversity and inclusion, and how to use organizational strategies to ensure success of personnel development initiatives to support the mission of sport organizations.

EDU 7292. Social Justice in Sports. 3 Hours.

Examines issues related to social justice in sports, including the influence of gender, economics, and geography within sports organizations. Studies the global footprint of sport and applies sports leadership principles to discover how sport can have a positive impact on society and various cultures. These include developing personal leadership skills and assumptions that can offer solutions for change. Sport organizations have become more socially responsible within the communities that they serve to help train and educate future leaders through the power of sport. Offers students an opportunity to investigate examples of sport being used as a vehicle for social justice and change worldwide. Studies the use of sport for development and peace.

EDU 7293. Legal and Ethical Issues in Sports Leadership. 3 Hours.

Investigates numerous legal cases and issues present in sports both professionally and at the amateur level. Seeks to enable students to gain an understanding of the legal responsibilities of sports leaders. Emphasizes researching ethical business and legal cases, including social issues relating to race and ethnicity as well as other issues on gender equity. In the amateur realm, investigates athletic eligibility, drug testing, low student-athlete graduation rates, pay-for play, concussion protocol, and violence in sports. Sport leaders also need to understand antitrust laws in order to protect and keep their respective sport organizations within the letter of the law. Offers students an opportunity to gain an understanding of how to apply legal theories to address each of these scenarios.

EDU 7300. Doctoral Research Seminar. 1-3 Hours.

Offers a special topics course designed to support candidates in the development of their doctoral projects. Through individual consultations with the instructor and critical feedback from their peers, this course offers students an opportunity to advance their Doctoral Project Proposal (DPP) by focusing in-depth on a specific application of practice-based research such as case studies, action research, evaluation studies, or survey studies. May be repeated for up to 6 total credits.

EDU 7961. Internship. 1-4 Hours.

Provides students with an opportunity for internship work. May be repeated without limit.

EDU 7962. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

EDU 7976. Directed Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to carry out an individual reading and research project under the supervision of a faculty member. The directed study format allows for the in-depth analysis of a particular topic not covered in-depth or the study of a subject not typically covered in the curriculum. A directed study proposal must be approved by the faculty sponsor, division head, and senior associate dean for academic affairs.

EDU 7978. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers independent work under the direction of members of the department on a chosen topic.

EDU 7980. Capstone. 1-4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to integrate their course work, knowledge, and experiences into a capstone project.

EDU 7983. Topics. 1-4 Hours.

Covers special topics in education. May be repeated without limit.

EDU 7990. Thesis. 1-4 Hours.

Offers students the opportunity for theoretical and experimental work conducted under the supervision of a departmental faculty.

EDU 7994. Thesis Continuation—PT. 0 Hours.

Offers continuing thesis supervision by members of the department.

EDU 7995. Project. 1-4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to undertake theoretical or experimental work under individual faculty supervision. May be repeated without limit.

EDU 7996. Thesis Continuation. 0 Hours.

Offers students the opportunity for continued thesis work conducted under the supervision of a departmental faculty.

EDU 8790. Doctoral Thesis Seminar. 6 Hours.

Supports the doctoral theses that must conform to the guidelines developed by members of the faculty. Final theses must be presented to a review panel prior to graduation. May be repeated once.

EDU 8791. Doctoral Thesis Continuation. 0 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity for continued doctoral thesis work conducted under the supervision of departmental faculty. May be repeated up to three times.

EDU 8792. Doctoral Thesis Continuation. 0 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity for continued doctoral thesis work conducted under the supervision of departmental faculty. May be repeated up to 24 times.

EDU 8796. Thesis Proposal and the Internal Review Board. 0 Hours.

Designed to support the thesis proposal and Internal Review Board (IRB) submission. After submitting their thesis proposals to the IRB, students are expected to continue to edit the first two chapters of their proposals in order to update or expand the literature review with recent contributions that have been made to the different bodies of research that inform their studies. Expects students to have developed a draft of the doctoral thesis proposal, including introductory chapter, literature review, and research design.

EDU 8797. Thesis Data Collection, Initial Analysis, and Management. 0 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity, following approval of the thesis proposal by the Internal Review Board, to begin their research projects, following their clear plans for data collection and early analysis. Expects students to gather data, conduct their initial analyses, and prepare their data for analysis.

EDU 8798. Thesis Data Analysis and Presentation. 0 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to engage in the data analysis process and construct their presentation strategy for their analyses. Culminates with a completed outline of the fourth thesis chapter approved by the student’s thesis advisor and second reader.

EDU 8799. Thesis Findings and Discussion. 12 Hours.

Supports the processes associated with writing the results and discussion chapters of the thesis. Highlights the scholar-practitioner aspect of the program’s mission, requiring that students think carefully about the practical implications of their work and how they plan to communicate or disseminate those implications to an authentic audience and engage relevant stakeholders in a relevant application of their findings. Successful completion is determined by a student’s defense of the final thesis work that is approved by their thesis committee.