Human Services (HUSV)

HUSV 1000. Human Services at Northeastern. 1 Hour.

Intended for first-year students in the College of Social Sciences and Humanities. Introduces students to liberal arts; familiarizes them with their major; develops the academic skills necessary to succeed (analytical ability and critical thinking); provides grounding in the culture and values of the University community; and helps to develop interpersonal skills—in short, familiarizes students with all skills needed to become a successful university student.

HUSV 1101. Human Services Professions. 4 Hours.

Explores the attitudes, values, skills, and knowledge of the human services worker and the reasons why people in modern society require human services assistance. Views the human services agency from the eyes of clients as well as society as a whole. Introduces the range of skills used in working with clients in a variety of helping roles such as counseling and interviewing, advocacy, and group work. Required for HS majors as a prerequisite to more specialized courses.

HUSV 1990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

HUSV 2300. Counseling in Human Services. 4 Hours.

Presents an overview of the major theoretical approaches to counseling and therapeutic interventions. Focuses on developing clinical skills and competency in intentional interviewing. Combines systemic group exercises and experiential activities to practice interviewing techniques. Cross-cultural issues in counseling are integrated throughout the course. Prereq. ENGW 1111, ENGW 1102, ENGL 1111, or ENGL 1102.

HUSV 2320. Techniques in Individual and Group Counseling in Human Services. 4 Hours.

Provides in-depth understanding of clinical practice with individuals, groups, and families. Focuses on developing practice skills through presentations, case studies, and self-reflection journals. Examines the role of spirituality within one’s clinical practice. Explores theoretical techniques and their applications in a variety of settings, with particular attention to populations at risk. Prereq. HUSV 2300.

HUSV 2350. Ethnic Relations, Cultural Identity, and Human Services. 4 Hours.

Introduces and sensitizes students to the forms, practices, and effects of racism and discrimination on the various populations in the United States and presents frameworks for understanding and working with people with histories of discrimination and different cultural identities. Pays special attention to human services with diverse populations in schools, prisons, and employment assistance programs. Prereq. Sophomore standing or above.

HUSV 2700. Exploring Adoption: Family, Kinship, and Identity in Contemporary America. 4 Hours.

Explores the phenomenon of adoption in the United States today from the perspective of all members of the adoption triad (adoptee, adoptive parents, and birth parents). Over the past several decades, the institution and experience of adoption have changed dramatically. Examines topics relating to domestic and international adoption, transracial adoption, open adoption and birth family contact, special needs adoption, adoption from foster care, adoption by gay parents, and the role of social class in adoption. Encourages students to think critically about the meaning of family, kinship, and identity in contemporary society.

HUSV 2800. Sexual Orientation and Gender Expression in Practice and Policy. 4 Hours.

Introduces students to efforts among social and nonprofit organizations working to reduce heterosexism, homophobia, and transphobia in institutions, communities, and the society as a whole. Discusses practice across the life span for social professionals (social workers, counselors, advocates, and educators) in varied settings such as criminal justice, mental health, adoption, adult day health, and residential programs. Applying theories and current scholarship on LGBTQQ identity development, social movements, media, and advocacy, offers students an opportunity to evaluate contemporary issues of controversy for institutions, social practitioners, and policy. Prereq. Sophomore standing or above. Cross-listed with WMNS 2800.

HUSV 2900. Gender Violence: Bystander Education Theory and Practice. 4 Hours.

Offers participants an opportunity to learn about the theoretical and practice models used to understand and respond to gender-based violence. Focuses on bystander models of prevention. This interactive course is designed for students who are interested in research and practice directed at youth. Explores topics such as battery, gender roles, teen dating violence, sexual harassment, sexual assault/rape, and homophobia as facets of men’s violence against women. Emphasizes trainer skill development for public health and social professionals. Studies how to effectively convene and facilitate public discourse about gender-based violence utilizing the Mentors in Violence Prevention curriculum with high school and college populations. Offers students an opportunity to apply these concepts in service-learning settings. Prereq. Sophomore standing or above.

HUSV 2990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

HUSV 3510. Special Topics in HS. 4 Hours.

Reviews and discusses selected human services topics. Prereq. Junior or senior standing.

HUSV 3520. Child Intervention and Treatment. 4 Hours.

Compares and contrasts primary, secondary, and tertiary levels of intervention as they pertain to child welfare systems. Examines specifically the effectiveness and efficiency of home-visiting-based interventions, school-based interventions, child welfare interventions, and programs and practices targeted to reduce and eliminate juvenile delinquency. Considers the availability, distribution, and effectiveness of these prevention, intervention, and treatment programs as they apply to children and their families. Hands-on service learning in the field of child intervention is designed to link the course work on research and theory to human service practice. Prereq. Junior or senior standing.

HUSV 3540. Services and Treatments for Chemical Dependencies. 4 Hours.

Explores students’ personal and cultural perspectives about substance use, abuse, and addiction through the use of readings, films, and case studies. Students evaluate the causes of chemical dependence, and methods of recognition, intervention, and treatment. Offers students the opportunity to investigate the effects of chemical dependency on the family. Prereq. Sophomore standing or above; human services majors and combined majors only. Cross-listed with CRIM 3540.

HUSV 3550. Social Policy, Advocacy, and Activism. 4 Hours.

Covers the fundamentals of advocacy and activism while developing a knowledge base in the areas of housing law and domestic violence. Lectures give an overview of the legal system while exploring its relationship to the social service system. Discusses the history of advocacy and activism, basic legal strategies, lobbying, court procedures, housing code violations, tenant/landlord laws, and restraining orders. Prereq. HUSV 1101.

HUSV 3570. Strategic Philanthropy and Nonprofit Management. 4 Hours.

Explores the multifaceted role of the nonprofit sector and philanthropy in the United States by examining the practices of and relationship between nonprofit organizations and funders. Topics include community needs assessment, strategy, program design and evaluation, organizational structure and capacity, governance and ethics, and sustainability. Offers students an opportunity to acquire practical skills on both sides of the grantee/grant-maker relationship by engaging in real-dollar grant making and nonprofit program management projects. Prereq. Sophomore standing or above.

HUSV 3580. Sexual Violence: Counseling, Programs, and Policy. 4 Hours.

Offers an in-depth examination of sexual violence, its effects, and the resources available to assist survivors. Presents an overview of the criminal justice, medical, legal, and counseling systems and the impact these interweaving systems have on survivors. Offers students an opportunity to develop crisis counseling competency through group exercises and experiential activities. Prereq. Sophomore standing or above.

HUSV 3700. Research Methods for Human Services. 4 Hours.

Offers an introduction to social science research that examines the theoretical and ethical foundations of social research methods. Highlights foundation knowledge and skills in hypothesis testing, research design, sampling strategies, measurement techniques, and basic data analysis and interpretation. Focuses on program evaluation to provide an opportunity for students to link social science research methods to direct human service practice. Prereq. HUSV 1101 and sophomore standing or above; human services majors and combined majors only.

HUSV 3900. Introduction to Social Policy. 4 Hours.

Examines how social policy influences child, family, and community development. Provides a historical overview and a contemporary examination of many social problems, including poverty, health and mental health issues, child welfare, educational inequality, and consequences of juvenile and adult crime. Examines the policies and programs that help or hinder positive individual, family, and community development and considers the role of human service values and ethics on the American response to social policy. Offers students an opportunity to examine and critique the implementation or lack of implementation of formal social policies at the local, state, and federal level and to suggest initiatives to meet the needs of intergenerational families. Prereq. HUSV 1101 and junior standing or above; human services majors and combined majors only.

HUSV 3990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

HUSV 4700. Senior Seminar in Human Services. 4 Hours.

Examines emerging roles and career options within the human services field. Focuses on self-examination of attitudes and values affecting delivery of services, exploration of ethical issues and dilemmas relevant to human services, grant and funding issues, staff supervision and development within human services agencies, and refinement of group leadership skills. Prereq. Senior standing; human services majors and combined majors only.

HUSV 4866. Intercultural Studies through Human Services. 4 Hours.

Focuses on students developing an understanding of the social, political, historical, and economic conditions in settings abroad and the corresponding social service and educational interventions. Uses an intensive, integrated study program that includes lectures, visits to cultural sites and government institutions, and a service-learning experience in a human-services or educational setting.

HUSV 4919. Program Preparation: International Human Services. 1 Hour.

Introduces students to the fundamentals of budgeting and program preparation in the field of human services. Intended to be taken prior to HUSV 4920. Prereq. HUSV 1101.

HUSV 4920. International Human Services. 4 Hours.

Examines human service organizations from an international perspective. Through classroom lectures, guest speakers, and field experience, students are exposed to how culturally relevant human service programming is developed/administered. Students participate in lectures, small-group work, and field experience. Field experience consists of a one-week intensive learning experience in an international setting or an equivalent intercultural experience. Prereq. HUSV 1101 and HUSV 4919.

HUSV 4945. Leadership and International Program Development. 4 Hours.

Introduces event-planning, program-planning/development, and management skills that are essential to the implementation of domestic and international programs. Critiques leadership models and practices in these settings using theory and case studies. Offers students an opportunity to apply planning theories/models and evaluation techniques in service-learning settings. Considers the elements of successful partnerships and collaborations through the execution of a final project.

HUSV 4970. Junior/Senior Honors Project 1. 4 Hours.

Focuses on in-depth project in which a student conducts research or produces a product related to the student’s major field. Combined with Junior/Senior Project 2 or college-defined equivalent for 8-credit honors project.

HUSV 4971. Junior/Senior Honors Project 2. 4 Hours.

Focuses on second semester of in-depth project in which a student conducts research or produces a product related to the student’s major field. Prereq. HUSV 4970.

HUSV 4990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

HUSV 4991. Research. 4 Hours.

Offers an opportunity to conduct research under faculty supervision.

HUSV 4992. Directed Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers independent work under the direction of members of the department on a chosen topic. Course content depends on instructor.

HUSV 4993. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers independent work under the direction of members of the department on a chosen topic. Course content depends on instructor.

HUSV 4994. Human Services Internship. 6 Hours.

Requires students to fulfill one internship placement during the last two years of the program. Consists of required field site hours and varies according to the students’ interests. Examples of placement sites include community centers, nursing homes, vocational workshops, state and federal agencies for children, and recreational facilities. Experiences are supervised by internship supervisor to maximize the student’s learning opportunities. Fulfills the Arts and Sciences experiential education requirement.

HUSV 5100. Sexual Violence: Counseling, Programs, and Policy. 3 Hours.

Offers an in-depth examination of sexual violence, its effects, and the resources available to assist survivors. Presents an overview of the criminal justice, medical, legal, and counseling systems and the impact these interweaving systems have on survivors. Offers students an opportunity to develop crisis counseling competency through group exercises and experiential activities. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

HUSV 5200. Strategic Communications for Nonprofit Organizations. 3 Hours.

Seeks to provide an understanding of the role of strategic communications in the nonprofit sector and to bridge theory with practice to develop communications strategies that support organizational goals and effectively move targeted audiences to action through appropriate and measured tactics. Examines case studies and engages in group work and individual papers that connect mission and goal setting with audience identification and segmentation, issue framing, message development, and communication. Offers students an opportunity to apply the course concepts in a service-learning partnership with an area nonprofit organization. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.