Language - General (LANG)

LANG 1000. Languages, Literatures, and Cultures at Northeastern. 1 Hour.

Intended for first-year students in the College of Social Sciences and Humanities. Introduces students to liberal arts. Offers students an opportunity to become familiar with their major; develop the academic skills necessary to succeed (analytical ability and critical thinking); obtain grounding in the culture and values of the University community; and develop interpersonal skills—in short, to develop the skills needed to become a successful university student.

LANG 1990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions. May be repeated without limit.

LANG 2990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions. May be repeated without limit.

LANG 3432. Romance Linguistics. 4 Hours.

Provides a general linguistic introduction to one of the most important language families. Discusses the structural characteristics of several Romance languages. Includes defining a language family, how and why languages change, and the relationship of standard and nonstandard linguistic varieties. Studies contemporary theoretical issues in Romance linguistics including object-pronoun placement, word order, creolization, and subject-pronoun use. Conducted in English. Requires reading knowledge of one Romance language or permission of instructor; LING 1150 recommended.

LANG 3434. Bilingualism. 4 Hours.

Focuses on the fact that half of the world’s population is bilingual, that is, uses two or more languages on a regular basis. Also explores the fact that bilingualism remains a poorly understood phenomenon surrounded by a number of myths: those that hold that bilinguals are found in bilingual countries and are equally fluent in both languages; that bilingual children suffer from cognitive impoverishment; and that bilingual education hinders the assimilation of minority groups. Reviews all aspects of bilingualism (in the world, in society, in the child, and in the adult). Discusses topics such as biculturalism and language change.

LANG 3438. Structure of French. 4 Hours.

Looks at the French language from a linguistic point of view, focusing on elements of French phonology (sound system), morphology (word structure), and syntax (sentence structure). Topics include how French compares with other Romance languages, as well as with non-Romance languages like English.

LANG 3500. Introduction to Translation Studies. 4 Hours.

Offers an introduction to translation studies and practice. Explores the following themes: translation as intercultural communication; linguistic, functionalist, and other theories of translation; translation and gender; translation and philosophy; translation and politics; and the ethics of translation. Students undertake translations that are germane to the themes described above. Requires completion of a language course at the 2102-level or permission of department.

LANG 3510. Translation and the Business World. 4 Hours.

Focuses on translation in the business world (commerce, computers, law, finance, trade, and economics). Dwells first on possible intercultural differences in doing business in a foreign environment and then moves on to practical exercises of business letters, résumés, annual reports, and texts related to international finance, trade, management information systems, and contracts. Requires completion of a language course at the 2102-level or permission of department.

LANG 3520. Translation and Literature. 4 Hours.

Delves briefly into some of the major concerns of literary translation of prose, poetry, and drama. Discusses different approaches (word-to-word vs. sense-to-sense, the visibility or invisibility of the translator, the pitfalls of translating historically or culturally remote texts, translation as creative rewriting, etc.). Discusses authors such as Borges, García Márquez, Neruda, Günter Grass, Canetti, Proust, Césaire, Beckett, Nabokov, and Pirandello. Requires completion of a language course at the 2102-level or permission of department.

LANG 3800. Special Topics in Language. 1-4 Hours.

Focuses on a particular theme of language and society that involves several languages (e.g., common literary themes, treatment of fairy tales, or folklore). The specific topic is chosen to reflect relevant comparative themes and expressed student interests. Requires an intermediate level of skill in a language. May be repeated without limit.

LANG 4670. Topics in French. 4 Hours.

Provides in-depth study of a specific topic in French studies. Topic to be chosen each year the course is offered. May be repeated without limit.

LANG 4700. Capstone Seminar. 4 Hours.

Provides the graduating student the opportunity to integrate the intellectual aspects of the program with its experiential elements, especially the study-abroad portion of the students’ program.

LANG 4800. Special Topics in Language. 1-4 Hours.

Focuses on a particular theme of language and society that involves several languages (e.g., common literary themes, treatment of fairy tales, or folklore). The specific topic is chosen to reflect relevant comparative themes and expressed student interests. Requires an advanced level of skill in a language. May be repeated without limit.

LANG 4920. Foreign Language Teaching: Theory and Practice. 4 Hours.

Intended for students who want to improve their understanding of how learners learn a second/foreign language and develop an approach to language teaching that is theoretically sound. Some of the topics included in the course are: theories of language acquisition, learning strategies, individual differences in language acquisition, the role of the environment, and the role of formal instruction. The course provides hands-on experience in the design of language teaching activities, unit and daily lesson planning, and long- and short-range objectives that are consonant with the National Standards for Foreign Language Learning. The ultimate goal of the course is to help students to develop the investigative and decision-making skills needed to foster professional growth.

LANG 4970. Junior/Senior Honors Project 1. 4 Hours.

Focuses on in-depth project in which a student conducts research or produces a product related to the student’s major field. Combined with Junior/Senior Project 2 or college-defined equivalent for 8-credit honors project. May be repeated without limit.

LANG 4971. Junior/Senior Honors Project 2. 4 Hours.

Focuses on second semester of in-depth project in which a student conducts research or produces a product related to the student’s major field. May be repeated without limit.

LANG 4990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions. May be repeated without limit.

LANG 4991. Research. 4 Hours.

Offers an opportunity to conduct research under faculty supervision. May be repeated up to two times.

LANG 4992. Directed Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers students a way of going beyond work given in the regular curriculum; may also enable students to complete major or minor requirements in certain situations. Priority is given to language majors and to juniors and seniors. May be repeated without limit.

LANG 4993. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers independent work under the direction of members of the department on a chosen topic. Course content depends on instructor. May be repeated without limit.

LANG 4994. Internship. 4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity for internship work. May be repeated without limit.

LANG 4996. Experiential Education Directed Study. 4 Hours.

Draws upon the student’s approved experiential activity and integrates it with study in the academic major. Restricted to those students who are using the course to fulfill their experiential education requirement. May be repeated without limit.