Leadership Studies - CPS (LDR)

LDR 0500. Taking Action: Getting Elected. 2.4 Hours.

Designed to give students an understanding of the complexities and issues related to a political campaign. Offers students an opportunity to learn issues and strategies from prominent leaders and politicians, including the ins and outs of running for office and what it means to hold a political office. .

LDR 0501. Leadership for a Change. 2 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to practice exercising leadership in public life, serving communities, and being committed to the idea of community. We are charged with serving and representing the citizenry while simultaneously effecting change. In this challenging and empowering workshop, students have the opportunity to get back in touch with their visions and senses of purpose; to examine the differences between authority, power, and leadership and between technical and adaptive challenges; and to develop a personal and powerful understanding of the roadblocks that prevent people from realizing their commitments and visions.

LDR 1200. Assessing Your Leadership Capacity. 3 Hours.

Introduces the methodologies and processes that are essential aspects of leadership: conceptualizing motivation, identifying traits, creating a vision, understanding influence, overcoming obstacles, developing character, and establishing a professional brand. Offers students an opportunity to focus on self-awareness, reflection, individual effectiveness, and self-assessment to learn how to recognize and utilize the differences between themselves and others. Students receive ongoing feedback from their peers and a chance to develop their own philosophy of leadership. The successful student should be able to answer the question, “What does it take to be a 21st-century leader?”.

LDR 1990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

LDR 2990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

LDR 3200. Leading and Managing Change. 3 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to develop the knowledge base necessary to lead and manage organizational change in all sectors with an emphasis on a 360-degree approach to understanding the many facets of change. Uses case studies that address various aspects of implementing change, such as: addressing the human psychology of change through innovative technology, social media, theoretical frameworks, understanding change agents, and operations. Encourages students to develop their views from both a management and nonmanagement perspective. The successful student should be able to gain knowledge and practical skills in how to connect change with strategy, anticipate resistance, assess readiness, and measure sustainability.

LDR 3250. Leading Teams Locally and Virtually. 3 Hours.

Covers the skills needed to manage teams in one office, in multisite locations, internationally or virtually. Topics include effective communication strategies, how to structure teams within an intergenerational environment, and how to leverage individual strengths to lead high-performance teams. Offers students an opportunity to identify barriers, study strategic methods for overcoming obstacles, leverage technology to build virtual spaces for people and ideas, and work to develop a strategy to optimize team effectiveness through a shared process and peer coaching by participating on a cohort team. The successful student should be able to understand their role as a catalyst, visionary, and leader in the formation and success of any team.

LDR 3400. Evidence-Based Leadership and Decision Making. 3 Hours.

Examines the components of evidence-based leadership that have been tested in various settings, shown to be effective, operational, and able to be used in solving real-world dilemmas. Emphasizes using decision-making models to analyze behaviors, align organizational goals, determine consequences, and make recommendations for actions leaders can make to solve problems. Studies the relationship(s) between scientific data, academic theory, technological advances, and changes in society toward the goal of understanding ethical problems. The successful student should be able to demonstrate increased information literacy, identify strategies for decision making, and know where to seek evidence needed in order to make high-quality decisions on a wide range of issues.

LDR 3990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

LDR 4850. Strategic Decision Making (Capstone). 3 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to examine and test leadership theory in practice. Students demonstrate their leadership knowledge gained during their undergraduate studies by completing an experiential action-oriented project. Under faculty guidance and approval, each student must present a body of work that addresses a critical leadership topic that will enhance their professional development as a 21st-century leader. Experiences can be undertaken within any industry sector or at the workplace with supervisor approval. Past projects have included research studies, case studies, new products, leadership development plans, publications, journals, magazines, media/films, training programs, etc. Requires students to deliver a presentation on their project and share a culmination of learned outcomes.

LDR 4896. Experiential Education Directed Study. 1-4 Hours.

Draws upon the student’s approved experiential activity and integrates it with study in the academic major.

LDR 4950. Seminar. 1-4 Hours.

Offers an in-depth study of selected topics.

LDR 4955. Project. 1-4 Hours.

Focuses on in-depth project in which a student conducts research or produces a product related to the student’s major field.

LDR 4983. Topics. 1-4 Hours.

Covers special topics in leadership studies.

LDR 4990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

LDR 4991. Research. 1-4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to conduct research under faculty supervision.

LDR 4992. Directed Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers independent work under the direction of members of the department on a chosen topic.

LDR 4993. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers independent work under the direction of members of the department on a chosen topic.

LDR 4994. Internship. 1-4 Hours.

Provides students with an opportunity for internship work.

LDR 4995. Practicum. 1-4 Hours.

Integrates theory and practice through a structured consulting experience working with organizations or conducting an applications-oriented research study. Introduces the problem-solving consulting model. From problem identification through recommendations, offers student teams an opportunity to work with decision makers to solve organizational leadership issues or conduct practical research studies. Prereq. Senior standing.

LDR 5976. Directed Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers independent work under the direction of members of the department on a chosen topic.

LDR 5978. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers independent work under the direction of members of the department on a chosen topic.

LDR 5984. Research. 1-4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to conduct research under faculty supervision.

LDR 6100. Developing Your Leadership Capability. 3-6 Hours.

Seeks to provide the foundation for the master’s degree program. Starts with the premise that everyone is capable of leadership by exposing students to a series of alternative perspectives of leadership, including some contemporary collaborative models. From careful consideration of these perspectives, as well as from applying them using action learning methods, students have an opportunity to build a personal model of leadership that they can put to immediate use in their workplace.

LDR 6110. Leading Teams. 3-6 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to lead teams through all stages of team development, learn and overcome team challenges, and determine the principles of building high-performing teams while nurturing the cohesion and bonding of team members. The team is the unit of an organization where most leaders begin to develop influence skills. Leading teams involves managing different personalities, cultures, and varying skill levels, while simultaneously securing resources and managing expectations of stakeholders. In this course, students also have an opportunity to learn effective techniques for working with virtual teams, managing conflict in teams, and facilitating team problem solving.

LDR 6115. Leadership Communication. 3 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to evaluate and utilize numerous communications options to develop an authentic, powerful, leadership voice using interpersonal, technology-mediated, and intercultural communications competencies and techniques; to develop a personal model for leadership communication; and to define an action plan for their growth in powerful leadership communications. In today’s dynamic, global work environment, leaders need to be able to communicate effectively with people located in the same geographical location or located anywhere across the globe.

LDR 6120. Organizational Leadership. 3-6 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to learn the best practices for onboarding, developing, and coaching leaders, as well as creating organizational systems that ensure the company has strong leadership talent for current and future success. The acquisition and development of a company’s current and future leaders is one of the most vital activities for healthy organizational identity, strong organizational performance, and ensuring long-term growth. Searching for, anticipating, and securing a pipeline of leadership talent, often referred to as developing “bench strength,” requires a proactive organizational environment that ensures the right processes are in place to support leadership development and succession planning. Prereq. LDR 6100.

LDR 6125. Managing Organizational Culture. 3 Hours.

Uses case studies to analyze organizations to define various organizational cultures and to determine ways to most effectively manage in that environment. Management vision and values, history, size, physical characteristics, and industry all contribute to the creation of an organization’s culture. The structures and processes created within each culture influence the behavior of individuals working within it. While leaders in one culture may thrive, others barely survive. Discusses what behavior the organizational culture is affecting; the impact the organization’s culture has on its strategy; how one can influence the culture of the organization; and how the culture survives in an era of mergers and acquisitions. Prereq. LDR 6100.

LDR 6130. Dynamics of Change at the Community and Social Level. 3 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to learn to assess the needs and interests of multiple stakeholders simultaneously; examine national and international trends, issues, and political shifts; and consider ways to bring the public interest and common good into organizational decision-making processes. Given the interplay among government, business, and society, leaders may be called upon to effect change at a community or social level. Understanding the dynamics of change at this level requires understanding the needs of the multiple stakeholders involved.

LDR 6135. Ethical Leadership. 3 Hours.

Considers leadership dilemmas that can arise when individual values conflict with those of the organization or when a situation requires decisions with conflict value sets. Offers students an opportunity to use case studies, their own experiences, and current events to examine actions leaders have taken and consequences faced when confronted with ethical dilemmas. Students work on a real-life ethical dilemma for understanding in-depth reasoning of the problem and to develop an action plan for solving and preventing similar problems at the organizational and societal levels. From these discussions, students have an opportunity to develop a personal model for ethical leadership.

LDR 6140. Strategic Leadership. 3-6 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to build strategic thinking competencies through case analyses of relevant businesses, nonprofits, and state organizations, as well as through strategic analysis of their own career path. Students work in a consultative role with partner organizations to develop strategic action plans, to perform critical analyses of external and internal environments for a real organization, and to develop recommendations for the organization’s strategic positioning and actions. From these discussions and personal development exercises, students have an opportunity to develop an action plan for personal growth as a strategic leader. Prereq. LDR 6100 and LDR 6120.

LDR 6145. Global Leadership. 3 Hours.

Explores changing demographics as they impact organizations of today and in the future and examines best-in-class organizations’ motivations to more fully appreciate the backgrounds, cultures, experiences, viewpoints, styles, and contributions of all workforce members. Offers students an opportunity to reflect on leadership from key ethical, legal, policy, business, political, and societal frameworks. In a global economy, leaders of best-in-class organizations understand that creating an inclusive work environment is essential for continued competitive advantage. The world’s exploding diversity coupled with technological advancements demand effective collaboration among employees from countries with different cultures, beliefs, and backgrounds.

LDR 6150. Transforming Organizations. 3 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to learn the framework for organizational transformation and obtain the skills and competencies required to develop and implement a holistic model of change. The strategies incorporate revealing the problems that ask to be solved, designing what the future change will look like, assessing the current situation in relation to the desired change, and planning and managing the transition from the current situation to the desired future. Within this course, students serve as consultants for real-life organizations, helping managers in their endeavors for organizational transformation. From these discussions, students have an opportunity to develop a personal model for change leadership and define an action plan for personal growth as a change agent. Prereq. LDR 6100 and LDR 6110.

LDR 6320. Event Planning. 3 Hours.

Provides an overview of strategies for special-event planning, including the management, planning, budgeting, costing, and marketing of an event. Examines corporate sponsorship opportunities to finance special events.

LDR 6323. Event Management. 3 Hours.

Examines strategies and techniques required to run successful events. Offers students an opportunity to learn how to manage logistics; the who, what, where, when, and how of running the event; how to develop checklists and manage processes to keep things running smoothly; and how to have contingency plans. Covers the basic details involved in running events— size, budget, venue, hospitality, marketing, publicity management— and working with vendors, community organizations, spectators, and celebrities.

LDR 6360. Dynamics of Change at the Community and Social Level. 3 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to learn to assess the needs and interests of multiple stakeholders simultaneously; examine national and international trends, issues, and political shifts; and consider ways to bring the public interest and common good into organizational decision-making processes. Given the interplay among government, business, and society, leaders may be called upon to effect change at a community or social level. Understanding the dynamics of change at this level requires understanding the needs of the multiple stakeholders involved.

LDR 6400. Sports Management. 3 Hours.

Provides an overview of management and administration pertaining to all levels of athletics. Focuses on basic theories of management and administration in athletic organizations. Addresses planning, scheduling, and financing aspects required to run a successful athletics program. Offers students an opportunity to learn to develop communication and management skills with an emphasis placed on decision making.

LDR 6405. Sport in Society. 3 Hours.

Examines the role sports plays in society. Emphasizes improving society through sports by creating and developing community service, drug awareness, and violence prevention programs. Discusses sports within sociological, economic, and political backgrounds. Topics include ethics, organizational code of conduct, and ethical behavior within competitive athletic settings.

LDR 6410. Leadership and Organization in Sport. 3 Hours.

Introduces a set of personal, interpersonal, and team-based skills and competencies required for leadership roles in sport organizations. These skills include self-awareness, managing stress, creative problem solving, communicating effectively, gaining power and influencing others, correcting performance and motivation problems, managing conflict, and delegation. Also explores the application of these skills in various contexts within the sports industry.

LDR 6425. Employment Issues in Athletics. 3 Hours.

Examines organizational practices in the management of human resources. Emphasizes staff planning, recruitment, selection, training, compensation, and contemporary problems of athletic personnel. Discusses immigration laws and work visas.

LDR 6427. Gender and Diversity in Sport. 3 Hours.

Examines gender and diversity in sport. Emphasizes creating equal opportunity for participants and administrative and leadership personnel. Explores affirmative action, human resources, and recruiting tactics and strategies.

LDR 6430. Sports Law. 3 Hours.

Addresses the legal aspects of sports, recreation, and leisure services, with a focus on tort and contractual liability. Covers legal concepts of negligence and principles of risk management, legal issues related to equipment use, facility management, and accommodation for special populations. Offers sports managers an opportunity to obtain the fundamental legal knowledge necessary to operate in the increasingly complex sports environment.

LDR 6435. Fiscal Practices in Sports. 3 Hours.

Examines the financial and regulatory issues confronting sports, fitness, and recreation industry managers. Covers accounting principles, financial statements, and related concepts that help determine the viability and strength of financial decision making.

LDR 6440. Sports Marketing and Promotions. 3 Hours.

Studies marketing and promotion strategies utilized in various aspects of the sports industry. Examines marketing sports as a product and marketing of nonsports products using sports as a promotional tool.

LDR 6441. Sports Media Relations. 3 Hours.

Studies the basic knowledge and understanding of media relations in sports. Emphasizes building and managing an effective media relations program on the intercollegiate and professional level. Examines news releases, hometown features, contest management, press conferences, statistics, and publications.

LDR 6442. Athletic Fund-Raising. 3 Hours.

Examines the fundamental tools and strategies necessary to raise funds within college athletics. Emphasizes annual fund-raising through solicitations via the mail, telephone, and interpersonal meetings and major gift and capital campaign solicitations and presentations. Discusses the role of the annual fund within the scope of an athletics department.

LDR 6443. Ticket Sales and Strategies. 3 Hours.

Provides an overview of ticket sales as a revenue source in athletics. Examines sales strategies for single-game, season ticket, and group sales; ticket office operations; and building a database for ticket sales.

LDR 6444. Licensing and Merchandising. 3 Hours.

Examines the licensing and merchandising aspects in sports. Emphasizes controlling logo rights through licensing companies. Examines purchasing, inventory, and sales of merchandise.

LDR 6445. Corporate Sponsorships. 3 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to develop a complete understanding of how sports properties can create effective commercial partnerships with corporations through the creation and execution of sponsorship agreements and how to prepare and critically evaluate the strategic implications of sponsorship proposals.

LDR 6446. New Media and International Sport. 3 Hours.

Addresses the media, culture, and sport displays presented by mega-events such as the Olympic Games. Presents, discusses, questions, and debates the notion of the sports festival that these mega-events provide, filtering it through the conceptual lenses that media, technology, and culture provide. Also explores a range of sporting events following the narratives and imageries that accompany them, paying particular attention to marketing and communication strategies, including policies directed at media and athletes. To achieve this, the course uses a series of case studies and practical assignments designed to help participants identify, analyze, and evaluate new media tools, coordinated online and offline strategies, cross-cultural communications, and sporting ideologies.

LDR 6450. Athletic Contracts. 3 Hours.

Studies the formation, interpretation, negotiation, and tax implications of sports industry contracts. Emphasizes team-player agreements, agent contracts, sports marketing contracts, collective bargaining agreements, facility leases, and related agreements. Focuses on the ethical rules governing lawyers in their interactions in the sports industry. Emphasizes athletic contract development and negotiation. Examines contracts as they relate to sports regarding personnel, corporate sponsors, facility leases, and scholarships.

LDR 6455. NCAA Compliance. 3 Hours.

Provides a thorough study of the governing structure, rules, and legislative process within the NCAA. Examines compliance issues within a collegiate athletic department, including drug testing, self-reporting, and student-athlete eligibility.

LDR 6460. Risk Management in Athletics. 3 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to develop the tools to conduct a thorough risk assessment for their organization and events by identifying potential risks, estimating their frequency and severity, determining how to control them, and developing safety policies and processes for staff and event participants. Emphasizes how to conduct a safety review and risk assessment and how to run an event that complies with health, safety, and security regulations.

LDR 6465. Title IX. 3 Hours.

Examines Title IX laws governing gender equity. Emphasizes managing an athletic department within the guidelines set forth by Title IX. Examines the original Title IX legislation, subsequent regulations issued by the Office of Civil Rights, and relevant court decisions.

LDR 6470. Bystander Strategies for the Prevention of Gender-Based Violence. 3 Hours.

Offers participants an opportunity to learn about the theoretical and practice models used to understand and respond to gender-based violence. Emphasizes bystander models of prevention. This interactive course is designed for students who are interested in research and practice directed at youth. Explores topics such as battery, gender roles, teen dating violence, sexual harassment, sexual assault/rape, and homophobia as facets of men’s violence against women. Emphasizes trainer skill development for higher education, secondary education, public health, and social professionals. Offers participants an opportunity to learn how to effectively convene and facilitate public discourse about gender-based violence utilizing mentors in violence prevention curriculum with high school and college populations and to apply these concepts in service-learning opportunities.

LDR 6505. Developing Internal and External Leadership Capacity. 7 Hours.

Offers participants an opportunity to build a personal model of leadership that they can put to immediate use in their workplace. Begins with the premise that everyone is capable of leadership. Exposes course participants to a series of alternative perspectives of leadership, including some contemporary collaborative models. Considers these perspectives as well as applies them using action learning methods. Offers participants an opportunity to gain an understanding of best practices in talent development (commonly referred to as “bench strength”), succession planning and management, and leadership development. Seeks to provide the foundation for the capstone project and for the master’s degree program.

LDR 6510. Leading the Organization. 7 Hours.

Examines principles of building highly effective teams by analyzing the variety of interrelated practices underlying group dynamics. Combines learning through classic case situations and contemporaneous experiences in a team-based simulation. Leadership is not a solo activity but only happens through others. Emergent leaders commonly begin with leading in the team sphere. Covers managing different personalities, cultures, conflicting political agendas, and varying skill levels while simultaneously securing resources and managing expectations of senior executives or other stakeholders internal or external to the organization. Examines ethical leadership, change theory, and models and conceptual frameworks that facilitate effective organizational integrity and change.

LDR 6515. Strategic Leadership. 6 Hours.

Uses case analyses of relevant businesses and institutions to offer students an opportunity to build strategic thinking skills. Based on these analyses, students develop recommendations for their own organizations’ success and actions they can take to influence strategic change. Effective leaders look within and beyond their organizations to determine the right direction for action. Leadership capability extends beyond operational excellence; it requires an appreciation of the external environment and its impact on the organization. A common gap in leadership competence of today’s administrators and managers is the ability to consider the role of the organization within its wider technologic, competitive, and economic environment.

LDR 6572. Master’s Project. 7 Hours.

Offers students a culminating opportunity to synthesize and integrate leadership knowledge gained in the master’s degree program. Examines the project evaluation and assessment techniques commonly used by the project manager. Analyzes both quantitative and qualitative approaches of evaluation and stakeholder analysis and techniques for reporting performance results. Combines applying leadership theory through a high-impact, real-world project. Offers participants an opportunity to design and complete an action-based research project that includes a project proposal, project plan, final report, and presentation under the guidance of a faculty member.

LDR 6595. Licensing and Merchandising. 3 Hours.

See LDR 6444.

LDR 6600. Licensing and Merchandising. 3 Hours.

See LDR 6444.

LDR 6615. Academic Advising for Student-Athletes. 3 Hours.

Offers an overview of the foundations of academic advising and life-skill training as an essential component of student-athlete success and retention programs on higher education campuses. Topics include definitions and concepts for developmental advising; literature and research on the key concepts of academic advising; exploration of the various models and delivery systems for academic advising; skills for effective advising; advising diverse populations; and training, development, evaluation, assessment, and reward systems for advisers and advising programs.

LDR 6961. Internship. 1-4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity, while under the supervision of a sports professional and utilizing relationships with local college, professional, and amateur organizations, to work on a term basis in specific sports-related assignments. Students share their experiences through a discussion board forum as well as deliver a final paper and develop a Web portfolio. The Web portfolio highlights the student’s skills, knowledge, development, quality of writing, and critical thinking by showcasing a comprehensive collection of work samples and artifacts from the student’s experiences in the sports leadership program.

LDR 6962. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

LDR 6964. Co-op. 0 Hours.

Provides eligible students with an opportunity for work experience.

LDR 6966. Practicum. 1-4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to integrate theory and practice in a real-world setting. Through this experience, students are given the opportunity to demonstrate their competence in the area of leadership knowledge and skill. With the advice of faculty, students define an appropriate project and environment in which to conduct their action research.

LDR 6970. Seminar. 1-4 Hours.

Offers an in-depth study of selected topics.

LDR 6980. Capstone. 1-4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to complete their academic experience with an in-depth, sports leadership internship. Students share their experiences through a discussion board forum as well as deliver a final paper and develop a Web portfolio. The Web portfolio highlights the student’s skills, knowledge, development, quality of writing, and critical thinking by showcasing a comprehensive collection of work samples and artifacts from the student’s experiences in the sports leadership program. By selecting an assignment of academic and professional interest, students are offered an opportunity to deepen their knowledge of a particular area of sports leadership through the senior project option. Intended for students already employed in the sports field.

LDR 6983. Topics. 1-4 Hours.

Covers special topics in leadership studies.

LDR 6995. Project. 1-6 Hours.

Focuses on an in-depth project in which a student conducts research or produces a product related to the student’s major field.

LDR 7961. Internship. 1-4 Hours.

Provides students with an opportunity for internship work.

LDR 7962. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

LDR 7976. Directed Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to carry out an individual reading and research project under the supervision of a faculty member. The directed study format allows for the in-depth analysis of a particular topic not covered in-depth or the study of a subject not typically covered in the curriculum. A directed study proposal must be approved by the faculty sponsor, division head, and senior associate dean for academic affairs.

LDR 7978. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers independent work under the direction of members of the department on a chosen topic.

LDR 7980. Capstone. 1-4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to increase their impact and effectiveness as a leader. Students develop an initiative for a real-life project that can be work-, community-, or university-based or, for a consulting case project, students develop a case study and case analysis. The case is a short description of a situation facing an organization and must be based on field research, depict real-life events, and describe a situation that requires a decision. The case analysis outlines the key issues in the case, identifies alternative scenarios for solutions, and provides the conceptual justification for the student’s recommendation using relevant reference material from College of Professional Studies graduate courses. The capstone project is an action-based leadership project. Prereq. LDR 6100, LDR 6120, and LDR 6140.

LDR 7983. Topics. 1-4 Hours.

Covers special topics in leadership studies.

LDR 7990. Thesis. 1-4 Hours.

Offers thesis supervision by members of the department.

LDR 7994. Thesis Continuation—PT. 0 Hours.

Offers continuing thesis supervision by members of the department.

LDR 7995. Project. 1-4 Hours.

Focuses on an in-depth project in which a student conducts research or produces a product related to the student’s major field.

LDR 7996. Thesis Continuation. 0 Hours.

Offers continuing thesis supervision by members of the department.