English - CPS (ENG)

ENG 0010. Elements of Writing. 2 Hours.

Reviews the structural patterns of current English. Students practice writing sentences, paragraphs, and short papers.

ENG 0901. Teaching Literature and Film. 6.8 Hours.

Seeks to provide English teachers with an approach for teaching literature and film using the great ideas of philosophy to unlock meaning and discover insight into the secondary school canon. The goal of this approach is for students of all skill levels to be able to identify themes in literature and films and engage in intelligent discussions of ideas and characters found within the existing curriculum. Participants read short selections, view films, and explore the core ideas from both Eastern and Western philosophy in roundtable discussions. Offers teachers an opportunity to gain a broader understanding of human nature, ethics, friendship and love, moral character, happiness, justice, equality, knowledge, duty, and freedom and to enrich their literature lessons while enriching the lives of their students and themselves. .

ENG 0902. From Socrates to Salinger: Using the Great Ideas of Western Philosophy. 6.8 Hours.

Offers English teachers an opportunity to develop a new approach to teaching literature and film using the ideas of Western philosophy to unlock the meaning and discover the insight into the secondary school canon. In the hands of good teachers, students of all skill levels are able to identify themes in literature and films and engage in intelligent discussions of ideas and characters found within our existing curriculums. Participants read short selections, view classic films, and explore core ideas from Western philosophy in roundtable discussions. Explores an understanding of ideas such as human nature, ethics, friendship and love, moral character, happiness, justice, equality, knowledge, duty, and freedom.

ENG 0903. Dancing the Texts. 6.8 Hours.

Explores educational practice. The concept of “the unit” is ubiquitous, but might there be another way to organize a study? Readings include several American texts in various genres simultaneously, keeping them all open before us, making connections between them, discovering the obvious and not-so-obvious bridges, all the while expecting rich edge effects and marvelous serendipity. .

ENG 0904. Teaching Poetry Writing to Adolescents. 6.8 Hours.

Explores how best to begin, how much to criticize, how much “theory” vs. how much unfettered “playing around,” what to expect from high school students, of what are they capable poetically, how to know if what they write is any good, and if you as a teacher have to write, too. Participants in this class take part in what the instructor calls “the high-toned soap opera of the writing life.”.

ENG 0905. The Hero Journey: Discovering Eastern Philosophy in Literature and Film. 6.8 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to develop a new approach to teaching literature and film using the great ideas of Eastern philosophy to unlock the meaning and discover the insight into the secondary school canon. Focuses on the concept of the hero journey, the archetypal tale of the dangerous adventure heroes take in search of the key to unlocking mystery and meaning. Uses canonical texts and classic American films to trace the mileposts on this universal trek.

ENG 0906. Writing and Teaching Memoir with Middle and High School Students. 6.8 Hours.

Considers ways to engage students in writing and learning from their own stories. Adolescents are often preoccupied with self. Drawing on that interest is a way to get them involved in reading and writing, reflecting on their lives, and learning from the contexts in which they live. Explores a variety of techniques, including group discussion, peer review, writing to prompts, and doing exercises, that could be used by participants with their own students. Readings illustrate the work of writers from a variety of backgrounds and cultures, as well as key ideas from psychology, cultural anthropology, and sociology. Considers reasons for caution and what is appropriate for students of different ages.

ENG 0907. Expository Writing: The Art of Argument. 6.8 Hours.

Designed for secondary school teachers—English teachers as well as teachers of other subjects—who plan to develop and refine information writing in content subjects. Is there a place for a writer’s voice in expository (informational) writing? What models and strategies of informational writing help writers express their voice? Offers participants an opportunity to explore the elements of exposition, read argument, write argument, and prepare an expository guidebook/teacher reference toolkit for classroom usage.

ENG 0910. Foundations of Writing. 3 Hours.

Introduces the principles of structured writing with an emphasis on understanding various rhetorical and paragraph forms. Offers students continuous practice in order to perfect skills—not only the essay and paragraph forms but also grammatical and syntactical correctness.

ENG 0913. Writing, Reading, and Teaching the Memoir: Stories We Live By . 6.8 Hours.

Examines memories about childhood and their significant contribution to adulthood. Offers students an opportunity to explore how to construct narratives of their own lives and explore the process that allows individuals to clarify the meanings and connections within the web of personal experience, as well as to utilize tools for continuing the journey of exploration in the classroom.

ENG 0914. A World of Stories: Teaching Global Perspectives through Literature . 6.8 Hours.

Examines a variety of literature, including stories for adolescents and children from around the world. Offers students an opportunity to explore response strategies that encourage them to build bridges from their lives to the larger world and participate in thoughtful dialogue around cultural experiences in a global context.

ENG 0915. Scribbling Women. 6.8 Hours.

Designed to introduce the literature of American women writers through content that demonstrates their importance in multiple contexts, including both the literary arts and social history. Encourages participants to teach literature through the use of interactive media to engage students as listeners, writers, creators, and critics. Offers participants an opportunity to become learners, researchers, and curriculum developers, as they create lessons for their own classrooms in accordance with the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education.

ENG 0920. Creative Drama: Literature in Action. 6.8 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to create and use their imaginations, to experience classic drama through a new lens, and to learn how to integrate creative drama into classroom activities. Designed for the English language arts classroom, this process-oriented, hands-on course seeks to engage learners in a variety of creative activities designed to effectively illuminate the relationship between literary text and performance. Because a play is only completely realized when performed, this course aims to consider questions of performance that open up the texts in exciting ways. Offers students an opportunity to read and study plays, exploring what it means to bring a play to life, how plays represent experience, what dramatic form is, and how it differs from that of fiction and poetry.

ENG 1103. College Writing 1 for Nonnative Speakers. 3 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to develop written communication skills and basic research techniques in preparation for English-language college writing in their majors. Incorporates reading, research, and critical thinking in the development of expository writing—the kind of objective, audience-directed prose used in college and the workplace to explain and defend ideas. Emphasizes planning, drafting, revising, and correct citation in essays, along with development of focus, organization, and paragraph/sentence structure. In addition to in-class assignments and peer-review activities, includes extended essays developed outside of class. Requires a grade of C or higher in order to receive credit and continue on to ENG 1107.

ENG 1104. Lab for ENG 1103. 1 Hour.

Requires students to analyze and draft writing assignments from topics covered in ENG 1103.

ENG 1105. College Writing 1. 3 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to develop written communication skills and basic research techniques in preparation for college writing in their majors. Incorporates reading, research, and critical thinking in the development of expository writing, the kind of objective, audience-directed prose used in college and the workplace to explain and defend ideas. Emphasizes planning, drafting, revising, and correct citation in essays, along with development of focus, organization, and paragraph/sentence structure. Offers opportunities for in-class assignments and peer-review activities in addition to extended essays developed outside of class. Students must pass with a C or higher in order to receive credit and continue to ENG 1107.

ENG 1106. Lab for ENG 1105. 1 Hour.

Requires students to analyze and draft writing assignments from topics covered in ENG 1105.

ENG 1107. College Writing 2. 3 Hours.

Builds on students’ skills of written communication and basic research in preparation for college writing in their majors. Offers opportunities to emulate and incorporate various rhetorical strategies in the development of written analysis and researched argumentation. Focuses on techniques for logical analysis (inductive and deductive reasoning) and effective reasoning, establishing credibility, and emotional appeals to develop persuasive arguments. Emphasizes planning, drafting, revising, and correct citation in essays. Offers opportunities for in-class assignments and peer-review activities in addition to extended essays developed outside of class. Students must pass with a C or higher in order to receive credit and continue to ENG 3105 or ENG 3107.

ENG 1108. Lab for ENG 1107. 1 Hour.

Requires students to analyze and draft writing assignments from topics covered in ENG 1107.

ENG 1200. Introduction to Literature. 3 Hours.

Surveys basic concepts in literature as these are integrated into various genres, such as poetry, short fiction, the novel, and drama. Examines fundamentals of literary analysis (plot, character, symbolism, theme, irony), as well as critical principles for making literary judgments. Discusses the definition and characteristics of the term “story,” and offers students an opportunity to analyze the role stories play in culture, politics, and other areas of daily life.

ENG 1990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

ENG 2105. Writing Workshop. 3 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to continue developing writing skills presented in ENG 1107. Requires students to have a strong grasp of English-language grammar and mechanics. Offers students an opportunity to learn the tools and techniques involved in analyzing, synthesizing, and evaluating argumentative texts. In addition to shorter writing assignments, students create a polished documented research paper of at least 10 pages, which must include proper MLA citation and effective research strategies. Emphasizes argumentative writing, peer review, and research skills aimed at preparing students for college writing in their majors. This is a required course for all Global Classroom students, and all students must pass with a C or higher in order to receive credit and continue to ENG 3105 and ENG 3107.

ENG 2106. Lab for ENG 2105. 1 Hour.

Requires students to analyze and draft writing assignments from topics covered in ENG 2105.

ENG 2230. English Literature 1. 3 Hours.

Explores English literature from the Middle Ages to the Romantic period and might include studying works by authors such as Chaucer, Donne, Milton, Pope, Swift, Johnson, Blake, Wordsworth, Byron, and Keats.

ENG 2231. English Literature 2. 3 Hours.

Explores English literature from the Victorian era through the present and might include studying works by authors such as Browning, Tennyson, Dickens, Wilde, Hardy, Woolf, Joyce, Lessing, and Pinter.

ENG 2450. American Literature 1. 3 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to examine the roots of American thought and culture to reach a broad understanding of many of the major currents of contemporary American thought. Explores American literature from its Puritan beginnings through the turn of the 20th century. Includes works by such writers as Winthrop, Franklin, Emerson, Thoreau, Poe, Stowe, Whitney, Dickinson, Twain, and DuBois.

ENG 2451. American Literature 2. 3 Hours.

Examines the continuing themes of the nature of the American dream, the desire to create a distinctly American literature, and continues through the artistic and literary movement known as modernism. Surveys the major American writers and major literary works through these eras. Includes works by such writers as Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, James, Hemingway, Moore, Faulkner, Ellison, Cahan, and Morrison.

ENG 3105. Writing for the Professions: Science and Engineering. 3 Hours.

Offers writing instruction for students considering careers or advanced study in fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Students practice and reflect on writing in professional, public, and academic genres as they plan, research, write, and analyze various forms of technical communications such as technical reports, progress reports, proposals, instructions, presentations, and technical reviews relevant to technical professions and individual student goals. Offers students opportunities to evaluate a wide variety of sources and to develop communication skills in audience analysis, critical research, peer review, and revision. Students must pass with a C or higher in order to receive credit. Coreq. ENG 3106.

ENG 3106. Lab for ENG 3105. 1 Hour.

Requires students to analyze and draft writing assignments from topics covered in ENG 3105. Coreq ENG 3105.

ENG 3107. Writing for the Professions: Business and the Social Sciences. 3 Hours.

Offers writing instruction for students considering careers or advanced study in business administration and the social sciences. Students practice and reflect on writing in professional, public, and academic genres as they plan, research, write, and analyze various forms of business communications such as proposals, recommendation reports, letters, presentations, and emails relevant to industry. Offers students opportunities to evaluate a wide variety of sources and to develop communication skills in audience analysis, critical research, peer review, and revision. Students must pass with a C or higher in order to receive credit. Coreq. ENG 3108.

ENG 3108. Lab for ENG 3107. 1 Hour.

Requires students to analyze and draft writing assignments from topics covered in ENG 3107. Coreq ENG 3107.

ENG 3210. Writing for Young Readers. 3 Hours.

Introduces the changing world of children’s literature by examining published picture books, chapter books, and young adult novels ranging from fairy tales to modern-day works. Examines the influence children’s literature has on young lives and its impact on culture and communication. Encourages students to examine their own childhoods for ideas as they complete writing exercises aimed at craft development and in the production of work designed for young readers. Provides time for students to critique their own work and the work of others in writing workshops and peer-review sessions.

ENG 3220. Writing Poetry. 3 Hours.

Introduces techniques, forms, structures, and styles of both traditional and contemporary poetry. Focuses on fundamentals of poetry, including line, diction, syntax, image, trope, rhetoric, and rhythm, along with examining roles of audience, speaker, and message. Class discussion emphasizes essential terms of poetic analysis as students develop an appreciation for the challenges that poets set for both themselves and their readers. Offers students an opportunity to use developing insights to craft original polished and completed poems. Provides time for students to critique their work and the work of others in writing workshops and peer-review sessions.

ENG 3230. Writing Fiction. 3 Hours.

Introduces techniques and strategies of fiction writing. Examines key communication elements of fiction, including plot, characterization, setting, point-of-view, and various story development techniques. Students have an opportunity to read and react to a variety of texts while completing writing exercises and while generating, developing, and revising original pieces of fiction. Provides time for students to critique their own work and the work of others in writing workshops and peer review sessions. Prereq ENG 1107.

ENG 3240. Writing Nonfiction. 3 Hours.

Explores how writers translate personal experience and research into effective pieces of creative nonfiction. Studies literary journalism, personal essays, memoir, nature writing, and other subgenres to enhance understanding of this communication strategy. Class discussions analyze published works through points of view of scholar and writer, while delving into ethical considerations of writing from “real” life. Considers accurate description, scenic representation, and narrative framing, along with meaningful integration of images, videos, and Web tools. Offers students an opportunity to develop and revise original works of creative nonfiction. Provides time for students to critique their work and the work of others in writing workshops and peer-review sessions.

ENG 3260. Writing to Inform and Persuade. 3 Hours.

Focuses on techniques used in nonfiction writing to communicate ideas and influence audience point of view about “true” events or affairs. Examines a variety of nonfiction pieces and styles, such as journalism features and profiles, editorials and opinion pieces, literary essays, and visual arguments. Offers students an opportunity to advance their understanding and appreciation of informative, persuasive writing techniques as they discuss, develop, revise, and review each other’s original nonfiction pieces.

ENG 3300. Literature and Business Leadership. 3 Hours.

Examines organizational leadership by studying fictional characters whose workplace challenges parallel those encountered by today’s business executives. Analyzes a variety of management styles and strategies as depicted in story form to guide students’ understanding of leadership as it applies to workplace responsibility, choice, risk taking, moral obligation, and self-mastery. Offers students an opportunity to use insights gained from literary examples to inform personal reflections on the meaning of leadership and the qualities that combine to make someone an effective manager of people and organizations.

ENG 3310. Literature, Technology and Culture. 3 Hours.

Investigates relationships between literature and technology and how these connections influence human culture. Explores how writers interpret roles of technology in society and examines ways literature encourages/discourages technological research and development. Seeks to guide students’ understanding of how literature, technology, and society link to envision new worlds, expand imagination, and impact concepts of individuality and community. Offers students opportunities to use insights gained from literature to inform personal reflections about technology’s role in culture and its impact on human life.

ENG 3440. Western World Literature. 3 Hours.

Explores literature from the ancient world through the Renaissance; the second half explores literature from the Enlightenment to the present. Covers a variety of writers and literary traditions and might include studying works by authors such as Homer, Sophocles, Virgil, Dante, Machiavelli, Cervantes, Voltaire, Goethe, Ibsen, Kafka, and Brecht.

ENG 3990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

ENG 4210. Writing for Publication. 3 Hours.

Focuses on nonfiction writing for students interested in learning how to generate story ideas and how to write and revise journalistic work for intended magazine audience/publication. Focuses primarily on development and pitch of travel or hobby-related articles for selected print or online magazines. Readings highlight a collection of publications to show what is revealed about magazines’ content and storytelling goals through use of audience, articles, structure, photos, and other elements. Offers students an opportunity to craft a manuscript and pitch letter designed for publication consideration. Provides time for students to critique their own work and the work of others in writing workshops and peer-review sessions.

ENG 4455. Topics in Shakespeare. 3 Hours.

Explores a subject or theme common to several plays by Shakespeare, such as Shakespeare’s women, the tragic vision, fathers and sons, the comic and the grotesque, and Shakespeare on film. Topics change from quarter to quarter and campus to campus. Students may take this course more than once, provided it is a different topic each time.

ENG 4896. Experiential Education Directed Study. 1-4 Hours.

Draws upon the student’s approved experiential activity and integrates it with study in the academic major.

ENG 4950. Seminar. 1-4 Hours.

Offers students the opportunity to integrate knowledge and abilities gained throughout the program. This capstone course for English majors concludes with a detailed research project. Prereq. Senior standing.

ENG 4955. Project. 1-4 Hours.

Focuses on in-depth project in which a student conducts research or produces a product related to the student’s major field.

ENG 4983. Topics. 1-4 Hours.

Examines a subject or theme as various as the literature that produced it, from the tragic hero to visions of utopia, from children’s literature to the literature of the dispossessed. Topics change from term to term and campus to campus so that students may take this course more than once, provided it is a different topic each time.

ENG 4990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

ENG 4991. Research. 1-4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to conduct research under faculty supervision.

ENG 4992. Directed Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers independent work under the direction of members of the department on a chosen topic. Prereq. Junior or senior standing.

ENG 4993. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to undertake special research. Prereq. Junior or senior standing.

ENG 4994. Internship. 1-4 Hours.

Provides students with an opportunity for internship work.

ENG 4995. Practicum. 1-4 Hours.

Provides eligible students with an opportunity for practical experience.

ENG 5976. Directed Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers independent work under the direction of members of the department on a chosen topic.

ENG 5978. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers independent work under the direction of members of the department on a chosen topic.

ENG 5984. Research. 1-4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to conduct research under faculty supervision.

ENG 6501. Teaching Literature and Film. 4 Hours.

Seeks to provide English teachers with an approach for teaching literature and film using the great ideas of philosophy to unlock meaning and discover insight into the secondary school canon. The goal of this approach is for students of all skill levels to be able to identify themes in literature and films and engage in intelligent discussions of ideas and characters found within the existing curriculum. Participants read short selections, view films, and explore the core ideas from both Eastern and Western philosophy in roundtable discussions. Offers teachers an opportunity to gain a broader understanding of human nature, ethics, friendship and love, moral character, happiness, justice, equality, knowledge, duty, and freedom and to enrich their literature lessons while enriching the lives of their students and themselves.

ENG 6502. From Socrates to Salinger: Using the Great Ideas of Western Philosophy. 4 Hours.

Offers English teachers an opportunity to develop a new approach to teaching literature and film using the ideas of Western philosophy to unlock the meaning and discover the insight into the secondary school canon. In the hands of good teachers, students of all skill levels are able to identify themes in literature and films and engage in intelligent discussions of ideas and characters found within our existing curriculums. Participants read short selections, view classic films, and explore core ideas from Western philosophy in roundtable discussions. Explores an understanding of ideas such as human nature, ethics, friendship and love, moral character, happiness, justice, equality, knowledge, duty, and freedom.

ENG 6503. Dancing the Texts. 4 Hours.

Explores educational practice. The concept of “the unit” is ubiquitous, but might there be another way to organize a study? Readings include several American texts in various genres simultaneously, keeping them all open before us, making connections between them, discovering the obvious and not-so-obvious bridges, all the while expecting rich edge effects and marvelous serendipity.

ENG 6504. Teaching Poetry Writing to Adolescents. 4 Hours.

Explores how best to begin, how much to criticize, how much “theory” vs. how much unfettered “playing around,” what to expect from high school students, of what are they capable poetically, how to know if what they write is any good, and if you as a teacher have to write, too. Participants in this class take part in what the instructor calls “the high-toned soap opera of the writing life.”.

ENG 6505. The Hero Journey: Discovering Eastern Philosophy in Literature and Film. 4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to develop a new approach to teaching literature and film using the great ideas of Eastern philosophy to unlock the meaning and discover the insight into the secondary school canon. Focuses on the concept of the hero journey, the archetypal tale of the dangerous adventure heroes take in search of the key to unlocking mystery and meaning. Uses canonical texts and classic American films to trace the mileposts on this universal trek.

ENG 6506. Writing and Teaching Memoir with Middle and High School Students. 4 Hours.

Considers ways to engage students in writing and learning from their own stories. Adolescents are often preoccupied with self. Drawing on that interest is a way to get them involved in reading and writing, reflecting on their lives, and learning from the contexts in which they live. We explore a variety of techniques, including group discussion, peer review, writing to prompts, and doing exercises, that could be used by participants with their own students. Readings illustrate the work of writers from a variety of backgrounds and cultures, as well as key ideas from psychology, cultural anthropology, and sociology. We also consider reasons for caution and what is appropriate for students of different ages.

ENG 6507. Expository Writing: The Art of the Argument. 4 Hours.

Designed for secondary school teachers who plan to develop and refine information writing in content subjects. The course is a tool kit for teaching informational writing with a focus on argument models, including classical argument.

ENG 6508. Integrating Poetry into the Elementary Classroom. 4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to explore the role of poetry in the classroom. Examines the use of poetry within the confines of a writing curriculum, the best strategies for teaching poetry to improve literacy, the writing skills poetry encourages and promotes, and the best texts to include. Addresses practical, hands-on applications for teaching writing and poetry, with a focus on strategies and mini-lessons for detail, word choice, strong voice, wordplay, and revision.

ENG 6509. Writing for the Twenty-first Century. 4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to consider the historical changes in the teaching of writing and how those shifts have allowed students and teachers to think of themselves as writers. Discusses and challenges the mandates that pressure teachers to meet standards that often work against individualized writing instruction. Covers grammar and language diversity, reading and writing connections, assessment and portfolios, revision, technology, and rhetoric.

ENG 6510. Literacy and Leadership: Professional Research in English Studies. 4 Hours.

Focuses on the professional research skills needed to define literacy curriculum goals for a department, school, or program. Considers how to craft strategies, presentations, and written texts about literacy for a broad public audience. Topics include the challenges to the contemporary classroom, such as how to help struggling readers, how to support English-language learners, how to prepare for AP exams, as well as ways of integrating visual rhetoric and media into the English/language arts curriculum.

ENG 6513. Writing, Reading, and Teaching the Memoir: Stories We Live By . 4 Hours.

Examines memories about childhood and their significant contribution to adulthood. Offers students an opportunity to explore how to construct narratives of their own lives and explore the process that allows individuals to clarify the meanings and connections within the web of personal experience, as well as to utilize tools for continuing the journey of exploration in the classroom.

ENG 6514. A World of Stories: Teaching Global Perspectives through Literature . 4 Hours.

Examines a variety of literature, including stories for adolescents and children from around the world. Offers students an opportunity to explore response strategies that encourage them to build bridges from their lives to the larger world and participate in thoughtful dialogue around cultural experiences in a global context.

ENG 6515. Scribbling Women. 4 Hours.

Designed to introduce the literature of American women writers through content that demonstrates their importance in multiple contexts, including both the literary arts and social history. Encourages participants to teach literature through the use of interactive media to engage students as listeners, writers, creators, and critics. Offers participants an opportunity to become learners, researchers, and curriculum developers, as they create lessons for their own classrooms in accordance with the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education.

ENG 6520. Creative Drama: Literature in Action. 4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to create and use their imaginations, to experience classic drama through a new lens, and to learn how to integrate creative drama into classroom activities. Designed for the English language arts classroom, this process-oriented, hands-on course seeks to engage learners in a variety of creative activities designed to effectively illuminate the relationship between literary text and performance. Because a play is only completely realized when performed, this course aims to consider questions of performance that open up the texts in exciting ways. Offers students an opportunity to read and study plays, exploring what it means to bring a play to life, how plays represent experience, what dramatic form is, and how it differs from that of fiction and poetry.

ENG 6961. Internship. 1-4 Hours.

Provides students with an opportunity for internship work.

ENG 6962. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

ENG 6964. Co-op. 0 Hours.

Provides eligible students with an opportunity for work experience.

ENG 6966. Practicum. 1-4 Hours.

Provides eligible students with an opportunity for practical experience.

ENG 6970. Seminar. 1-4 Hours.

Offers an in-depth study of selected topics.

ENG 6980. Capstone. 1-4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to integrate their course work, knowledge, and experiences into a capstone project.

ENG 6983. Topics. 1-4 Hours.

Covers special topics in English.

ENG 6995. Project. 1-4 Hours.

Focuses on in-depth project in which a student conducts research or produces a product related to the student’s major field.