Art + Design

Website

Andrea Raynor, MFA
Interim Chair

239 Ryder Hall
617.373.2347
617.373.8535 (fax)
Judy Ulman, Administrative Assistant, j.ulman@northeastern.edu

Art makes life meaningful. Design makes life possible. Together they make life wonderful. The work of artists and designers informs and forms cultures, benefits society, and empowers the global marketplace of ideas. The faculty in the Department of Art + Design seeks to prepare students for a rich and rewarding life making a significant difference in the lives of others. We study the fundamentals of knowing, thinking, making, and doing; you have an opportunity to learn to use ideas and influences, tools and techniques, and principles and processes of art and design. We provide a faculty, format, and facilities for a great experiential education in art and design within a major urban research university. You pursue your curiosity about, intentions toward and obligations to the evolving world. Summer programs in Iceland, Ireland, Venice, Rome, London, Berlin, Budapest, Cuba, and Ecuador offer intensive studio experiences to augment your study with travel and creative work in the context of other cultures.

We seek to cultivate your talents as a creative source of original ideas and expressions of an inner life, using classical, current, and emerging media. You are inspired and challenged to critique and create works of art and design. You will gain visual literacy and fluency with form in the context of a liberal arts education and professional art and design practices. Understanding form is essential to understanding anything. Experimenting with form is essential to understanding form. Artists and designers experiment with form. You can be transformed into a creative force, ready to realize your potential and create cultural value and social benefit.

Art, BA

A studio-based fine art program that offers a broad and deep exploration of what it means to be culturally aware, skilled, and productive, the BA in Art balances studio courses in drawing/painting and digital media with art history and visual studies. Students’ education, experience, and training in understanding cultural practices take full advantage of the remarkable scope of the College of Arts, Media and Design. The focus of obtaining a well-rounded liberal arts education, within a broad study of the arts and humanities, is complemented by the study of a language and its cultural context and knowledge in the natural, physical, and social sciences. Some courses in this program are offered in Ireland, a cultural treasure-house amid natural splendor, where students have an intensive and immersive experience. There students make art in their own studios in an art school equipped with all the tools and resources an artist requires. Select courses at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (SMFA), adjacent to the Northeastern campus, permit students to discover new talents and interests. Most important, ample elective choices include study-abroad programs and span the complete range of offerings of our college.

The concentration in visual studies incorporates art and design history with a cultural study of seeing. Understanding vision to be as much a product of lived culture and a phenomenon that is as dynamic, creative, and social as it is physical and biological, visual studies explores differing ways to interpret the visible world that surrounds us. Students are exposed to the history and theory of the visual arts and visual experience as they address connections between topics as wide-ranging as Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa and the computer interface used in Apple’s Lisa. Visual studies seeks to develop critical insight into, and understanding of, what is seen. 

The BA in art is offered with the following concentration options:

Media Arts, BFA

The continuing revolution in digital computing and global communications has produced a rapidly evolving field for artists who create experiences of image and form with computer screens, intelligent devices, and new materials. Artists also invent tools for exploring, creating, and distributing their ideas and works. Media arts practices of animation, game, game art, photography, and video arts are offered with variations more yet to be invented.

Courses in imaginative and narrative arts, required for professional work in documentary films, game art and promotion, visualization, motion graphics, interactive art, illustration, and short animated film are offered. An intensive studio program, the curriculum provides knowledge, experience, and techniques of media arts informed by theory, experimentation, and critique. Extensive digital imaging and interactive media editing and production facilities offer the opportunity to become highly proficient in the current skills and emerging practices necessary for remarkable work. The media arts are evolving and expanding their reach into culture and society in daily life and global experience. The revolutions in 3D printing, embedded devices, and robotics are changing the landscape in which the media artist will operate. This degree prepares students to meet the challenges of continuous change with adaptive ingenuity.

The BFA in media arts is offered with the following concentration options:

Design, BFA

Design is the practice-based discipline raising important questions about—and providing significant answers to—how we live. Designers are needed when we don’t know what is needed. Designers propose alternative futures and create new choices using design principles and processes to create, compose, and construct meaning in diverse knowledge fields. Designers seek a broad understanding of principles and systems of perception, communication, and action. Concentrations in design practices are graphic and information design, interaction design, and experience design.

Graphic design makes messages and meaning using visual form and the integration of text and image. It often has a persuasive intention and uses rules of visual composition, form, and pattern to enable storytelling or to create attention and an ambience for consideration. Information design focuses on visualizing concepts and data to enhance human understanding of complex and vital knowledge.

Interaction design focuses on the creation of navigable interfaces and systems that allow audiences to achieve meaningful goals, connecting people to people and people to information and environments.

Experience design is a holistic approach that utilizes investigation into human environments in specific situations to improve quality. Given an understanding of goals, needs, and desires, it seeks to improve the various contexts by identifying and studying events and how they can be turned into beneficial practices.

As intensive studio programs, the curricula balance theory and design history and theory with studio projects in all media. As a design analyst, inventor, interpreter, curator, and producer of information, interaction, and experience, students can integrate many facets of university and liberal arts education.

The BFA in design is offered with the following concentration options:

  • Without concentration
  • With a concentration in graphic and information design
  • With a concentration in interaction design
  • With a concentration in experience design

Studio Art, BFA

The BFA in studio art is offered in partnership with the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (SMFA), adjacent to the Northeastern campus. In this major, the studio art classes are taken at the SMFA, which permits students to explore a wide range of artistic media including ceramics, drawing, film, glasswork, metalsmith, painting, performance, print and paper, sculpture, and sound in their extensive studio environments. Art and design history courses are taken in the department. In addition students have access to all the elective courses, co-op, study-abroad programs, technology and student resources that Northeastern students experience.

The BFA in studio art degree is awarded by Northeastern.

Combined Majors

The Department of Art + Design also offers the following combined majors:

Minors

The Department of Art + Design offers the following minors:

Preapproved Template Programs

The Department of Art + Design offers preapproved template programs in the following areas:

  • Experience design
  • Graphic and information design
  • Interaction design
  • Media arts
  • Visual studies

Each template program may be paired with another preapproved template program to create a combined major; to see a list of current preapproved template programs, visit the combined majors webpage.

Students may request admission to such a combined major via the Combined Major Approval Form, which requires approval by both disciplines/colleges together with an approved curriculum. For additional information on preapproved template programs, see “Student-Requested Combined Major.” For template program requirements, visit the myNEU web portal, click on the “Self-Service” tab, then on “My Degree Audit.”

Admission Requirements for Art + Design

There are specific admissions criteria for students entering majors in the Department of Art + Design. See “Admission Requirements for the College of Arts, Media and Design.”

Academic Progression Standards

Same as college standards.

Art - Media Arts

ARTD 1990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

ARTD 2100. Narrative Basics. 4 Hours.

Explores narrative sequence and story development in a variety of story architectures and media combinations, including text, video, music, audio, and design. Uses lectures, in-class workshops, and collaborative projects to expose students to the critical role of narrative in society and interactive media, including games. Offers students an opportunity to develop an interactive media design document over the second half of the semester. Prereq. ENGW 1111, ENGW 1102, ENGL 1111, or ENGL 1102.

ARTD 2200. Interactive Narrative. 4 Hours.

Continues the study of narrative structures from ARTD 2100, emphasizing analysis and development of interactive and experimental new media applications. Offers students an opportunity to explore narrative issues in immersive multimedia and gaming, including dynamic characters and multiuser environments. Students work in teams to develop narrative continuity across multiple media, including alternate-reality games and other forms of multimedia experiences. Prereq. ARTD 2100 or IM 2100.

ARTD 2350. Photo Basics for Nonmajors. 4 Hours.

Offers a basic photography course that introduces students to the use of camera controls, computer-based image and file management systems, lighting, and final printing. Additionally, books on demand, slide shows, and image archiving are demonstrated and then explored by students. No previous experience is necessary. Does not fulfill major or minor requirements for students within the Department of Art + Design. Prereq. Not open to majors or selected combined majors in the Department of Art + Design.

ARTD 2360. Photo Basics. 4 Hours.

Offers an introductory lecture/lab photography class. Explores the technical and theoretical concepts throughout the history of photography. The lab component of the course covers processing, editing, and output of images. Culminates in a final project designed to demonstrate both technical and conceptual knowledge of the medium. Prereq. ARTF 1122. Coreq. ARTD 2361.

ARTD 2361. Photo Tools. 1 Hour.

Offers an introductory photography lab designed to enable the student to acquire basic technical camera usage and digital capture. Explores photographic image management applications. Coreq. ARTD 2360.

ARTD 2370. Animation Basics. 4 Hours.

Offers an introductory studio course that explores the creative potential of animation. Exposes students to a variety of traditional animation processes and techniques through lectures, demonstrations, and hands-on assignments. Provides an historical survey of animation art through the twentieth century. Emphasizes using the computer to develop concepts creatively while learning the fundamental skills of constructing animated images and forms. Prereq. ARTF 1120 and ARTF 2220. Coreq. ARTD 2371.

ARTD 2371. Animation Tools. 1 Hour.

Introduces intermediate skills and software used in creating 3D animation. Explores modeling, surfacing, lighting, key framing, and rigging in this technology workshop. Coreq. ARTD 2370.

ARTD 2380. Video Basics. 4 Hours.

Offers an introductory exploration into the moving image as an art form. Covers the fundamental technical and aesthetic aspects of contemporary video production. Emphasizes personal, experimental works from an individual point of view. Analysis of projects is directed toward the development of a personal voice. Prereq. ARTF 2220. Coreq. ARTD 2381.

ARTD 2381. Video Tools. 1 Hour.

Introduces intermediate skills and software used in capturing, manipulating, and editing video and audio in this technology workshop. Coreq. ARTD 2380.

ARTD 2990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

ARTD 3460. Photography 1. 4 Hours.

Continues ARTD 2360, spending significant time on idea generation and research based on contemporary theoretical principles. Explores digital capture and image management in conjunction with project development. Requires a final project based on individual research and the establishment of a concise point of view. Prereq. ARTD 2360.

ARTD 3470. Animation 1. 4 Hours.

Introduces the fundamentals of three-dimensional computer animation. Class lectures and demonstrations are followed by substantial hands-on exploration. Students gain fundamental skills for modeling, surfacing, and animating. Projects progress from creating simple geometric objects to realistic organic characters. Basic systems for animating are introduced and explored. Prereq. ARTD 2370.

ARTD 3471. Virtual Environment Design. 4 Hours.

Utilizes elements of story and game play in the design of both 2D and 3D environments, integrating architecture, landscape, and set dressing. Introduces real-time procedurally generated terrain and flora, asset optimization, and nonlinear path finding. Explores content ranging from historically accurate and contemporary hyperrealistic to stylized and fanciful. Prereq. ARTD 2370 and ARTF 1120.

ARTD 3472. Character Design for Animation. 4 Hours.

Focuses on the development of characters as they relate to game design and animation. Explores, through treatments and synopsis, theme-based character back story, rationale, and visual design. Integrates learning objectives of both 2D and 3D, optimized rigging, movement study, and accessory and prop design. Prereq. ARTD 2370 and ARTF 1120.

ARTD 3473. Animation for Games. 4 Hours.

Explores all areas of 3D game asset creation—animation, modeling, shading, effects, and their integration. Working in small groups, students have an opportunity to learn how to construct animated assets that work efficiently within a game programming environment. Encourages students to specialize in at least one area of asset creation. Prereq. ARTD 3470.

ARTD 3480. Video: Sound and Image. 4 Hours.

Continues the study of video as an art form. Focuses on the dynamic relationship between sound and the moving image. Begins with audio exercises exploring various aspects of sound design that are integrated into an in-depth video production. Emphasizes the production of innovative video art with powerful visual imagery, complex editing rhythms, and creative sound design. Prereq. (a) ARTD 2380 or MSCR 1230 and (b) sophomore standing or above.

ARTD 3485. Video Art. 4 Hours.

Constitutes an advanced video production and analysis course. Emphasizes the development of personal vision and building a working knowledge of contemporary video art techniques. Offers students an opportunity to expand conceptual ideas and visual language skills by interrogating concepts of time, movement, light, and space within their working process. Visual research and discussion supplement the studio work. Prereq. (a) ARTD 2380 or MSCR 1230 and (b) sophomore standing or above.

ARTD 3990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

ARTD 4530. Media Arts Degree Project 1. 4 Hours.

Explores the criticism and theory associated with digital art. Offers students an opportunity to apply this knowledge to research in one of the digital media (photography, animation, and video) in preparation for completion of their degree project. Prereq. (a) ENGW 1111, ENGW 1102, ENGL 1111, or ENGL 1102 and (b) junior or senior standing; restricted to selected Art + Design majors and combined majors.

ARTD 4565. Photography 2. 4 Hours.

Continues ARTD 3460 with intensive project research based on specific theoretical principles chosen by the student. Explores various photographic formats, digital scanning, and Web usage. Requires a final written theoretical and visual project for successful completion of the course. Prereq. ARTD 3460.

ARTD 4570. Animation 2. 4 Hours.

Continues ARTD 3470. Focuses on seamless integration of animated three-dimensional models with digital photographic backgrounds. Continued emphasis on building comprehensive modeling, surfacing, and animation skills. Students develop original content based on course objectives. Complex systems for creating realistic movement are introduced. Exposes students to compositing and animation processes through lectures, demonstrations, and hands-on assignments. Prereq. ARTD 3470.

ARTD 4575. Animation 3. 4 Hours.

Continues ARTD 4570. Focuses on building comprehensive modeling, animation, and compositing skills in this advanced studio course. Students explore creating special effects through seamless mixture of computer-generated imagery and digital video footage. Advanced compositing and lighting techniques are introduced and explored. Students create original characters using organic modeling and surfacing techniques. Exposes students to animation and compositing processes through lectures, demonstrations, and hands-on assignments. Prereq. ARTD 4570.

ARTD 4577. Digital Sculpture and Model Making. 4 Hours.

Focuses on the potential of sculpture and model making as a means of creative expression and for the communication of visual ideas. Offers students an opportunity to develop formal and technical skills for digital sculpting and the application of those skills for creating tangible models. Explores traditional and digital modeling techniques and utilizes 3D scanning and 3D printing techniques for physical model construction. Examines the historic role of model making and prototyping in the development and creation of fine art, game art, animation, and product design. Prereq. ARTF 1124 or permission of instructor.

ARTD 4660. Studio Photography. 4 Hours.

Examines studio practices and lighting techniques. Offers students an opportunity to obtain a thorough understanding and working knowledge of contemporary practice in the photography studio. Includes comprehensive exercises and assignments with various types of lighting equipment. Prereq. ARTD 2360.

ARTD 4661. Alternative Photographic Processes. 4 Hours.

Focuses on analog-based conventional black-and-white photography. Explores, demonstrates, and uses nineteenth- and twentieth-century photographic processes to explore alternative delivery systems for creative and professional applications. Prereq. ARTD 2360.

ARTD 4670. Media Arts Degree Project 2. 4 Hours.

Continues ARTD 4530. Offers students an opportunity to research and produce a final semester project and a written thesis. Prereq. ARTD 4530 and junior or senior standing; restricted to selected Art + Design majors and combined majors.

ARTD 4682. Video in Context: Video and Social Change. 4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to apply and refine video production skills to develop an advanced project of broad interdisciplinary significance. Introduces students to established and emerging media genres, advanced research and analysis, and activist video practices for project development. This is a hybrid lecture/studio course that incorporates screening with guest directors to consider a variety of theoretical and practical approaches to societal change and to the potential of video arts for a politics of visual representation, critical analysis, and empowerment. Prereq. (a) ARTD 2380 or MSCR 1230 and (b) junior or senior standing.

ARTD 4990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

ARTD 5001. Arts in the Public Sphere Seminar 1. 4 Hours.

Examines a multitude of approaches to the creation and study of arts in the public sphere, including theory, methods, aesthetic debates, and professional practices as they have evolved in the field over time. Includes regularly scheduled critique, review, and defense of the students’ ongoing bodies of work, as well as group experiential learning projects that allow students to interact with leading practitioners, curators, and institutions in the field. The course paves the way toward the development of a thesis project and seeks to foster growth as practicing artists, designers, and professionals in the creative culture industry. Prereq. Senior or graduate standing; arts, media and design students only.

ARTD 5002. Arts in the Public Sphere Seminar 2. 2 Hours.

Continues the study of arts in the public sphere from ARTD 5001. Prereq. ARTD 5001 and senior or graduate standing; arts, media and design students only.

ARTD 5101. Interactive Media Arts 1. 4 Hours.

Examines in-depth the issues involved in new media performance and interactive technologies that are used in or mediate performances, artworks, or installations. Emphasizes the ways in which current art intersects with ideas in the larger cultural context. Introduces methods of creative research and thematic development that results in a unique individual and/or stylistic expression. Offers students an opportunity to develop an individual approach to the interactive media art form that results in original works of art. Introduces concepts and practices of scripted interactive media including, but not limited to, Processing, Flash, JavaScript, and hardware such as Arduino. Prereq. Senior or graduate standing; arts, media and design students only.

ARTD 5202. Photographic Media in Cultural Context. 4 Hours.

Offers a practice-based course that gives students an opportunity to refine their photographic practice and to respond to contemporary photographic theory in conjunction with their portfolio work. Explores the many ways photography can be produced and experienced by investigating current cultural influences and technologies. Requires students to demonstrate an understanding of the various criteria used for making critical judgments about the visual arts, including the relationship of visual culture within a societal context. Using this individual approach to their photography, students are expected to develop a body of work that expresses their intent. Prereq. Senior or graduate standing; arts, media and design students only.

ARTD 5301. Independent Research Project 1. 4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to independently create practiced-based design of new media performance or experiences. Expects students to independently research interactive technologies used in contemporary-based artworks. Under faculty mentorship, students independently explore methods of creative research and thematic development that result in a unique individual and/or stylistic expression in original works of art. Includes student presentations of ongoing research and works in progress to faculty for assessment. Prereq. ARTD 5101 and graduate standing; arts, media and design students only.

ARTD 5582. Collaborative Video and Community Engagement. 4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to explore the process of collaborative video making with a focus on the ethics and social dynamics of civic engagement in this video production course. Expects students to participate in interactive team-based production labs that mix theoretical analysis and technical training. Examines different theories that inform conceptualizations of social justice and ethics. Explores different forms of authorship, video genres, and digital tools for collaboration ranging from crowdsourcing to remix platforms. Offers students an opportunity to produce reflection papers on the process of collaboration and engagement with diversity, as well as video art projects for organizations working on campus and in the Boston area. Prereq. (a) ARTD 2380 or MSCR 1230 and junior or senior standing or (b) graduate standing.

Art - General Courses

ARTE 1135. Visual Literacy. 4 Hours.

Examines the ways we create, use, interpret, and analyze images within cultural contexts. Explores the power of visual imagery through readings, discussions, written assignments, and visual projects encouraging purposeful seeing. Prereq. Not open to Art + Design majors.

ARTE 1990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

ARTE 1995. Practicum. 1-4 Hours.

Offers eligible students an opportunity for practical experience.

ARTE 2101. Introduction to Co-op. 1 Hour.

Offers students an opportunity to explore the basics of cooperative education through a careful exploration of aspects of preparation, activity, and reflection—the core of the co-op learning model. Each week students are asked to delve into different areas of self-assessment, career exploration, goals setting, and skill building. Covers résumé and cover letter writing, interviewing, self-marketing, and brand identity as well as portfolio basics and how to use the University’s online listing of jobs and other services. Guests include professionals from Career Services and employers and alumni who seek to give students insights into various arts professions. Prereq. Restricted to selected Art + Design majors.

ARTE 2500. Art and Design Abroad: Studio. 4 Hours.

Offers an intensive studio course taken abroad and taught by an art and design faculty member. Exposure to regional artists, history, culture, museums, architecture, and physical geography provide focus of study and creative exploration.

ARTE 2501. Art and Design Abroad: History. 4 Hours.

Offers an intensive history course taken abroad and taught by an art and design faculty member. Exposure to regional artists, history, culture, museums, and architecture provide a rich context for studying the history of art and design.

ARTE 2990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

ARTE 2995. Practicum. 1-4 Hours.

Offers eligible students an opportunity for practical experience.

ARTE 3901. Art and Design Special Topics. 4 Hours.

Offers an art and design course in which format and content are determined by the instructor.

ARTE 3990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

ARTE 3995. Practicum. 1-4 Hours.

Offers eligible students an opportunity for practical experience.

ARTE 4901. Special Topics in Art and Design Studio. 4 Hours.

Offers an art and design studio in which format and content are determined by the instructor. Prereq. Junior or senior standing; restricted to selected Art + Design majors and combined majors.

ARTE 4902. Special Topics in Art and Design History. 4 Hours.

Offers a seminar in art and design history in which format and content are determined by the instructor. Prereq. Junior or senior standing; restricted to selected Art + Design majors and combined majors.

ARTE 4970. Junior/Senior Honors Project 1. 4 Hours.

Focuses on in-depth project in which a student conducts research or produces a product related to the student’s major field. Combined with Junior/Senior Project 2 or college-defined equivalent for 8 credit honors project. Prereq. Restricted to selected Art + Design majors and combined majors.

ARTE 4971. Junior/Senior Honors Project 2. 4 Hours.

Focuses on second semester of in-depth project in which a student conducts research or produces a product related to the student’s major field. Prereq. ARTE 4970; restricted to selected Art + Design majors and combined majors..

ARTE 4990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

ARTE 4991. Research. 4 Hours.

Offers an opportunity to conduct research under faculty supervision.

ARTE 4992. Directed Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers independent work under the direction of members of the department on a chosen topic. Course content depends on instructor.

ARTE 4994. Internship. 4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity for internship work.

ARTE 4995. Practicum. 1-4 Hours.

Offers eligible students an opportunity for practical experience.

ARTE 4996. Experiential Education Directed Study. 4 Hours.

Draws upon the student’s approved experiential activity and integrates it with study in the academic major. Restricted to those students who are using it to fulfill their experiential education requirement.

ARTE 5901. Special Topics in Art and Design Studio. 4 Hours.

Offers an opportunity for the intensive study of specialized themes in areas of research in studio and aesthetics related to art and design. Instructor determines format and content. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

Art - Fundamentals Courses

ARTF 1000. Art and Design at Northeastern. 1 Hour.

Intended for freshmen in the College of Arts and Sciences. Introduces freshmen to the liberal arts in general; familiarizes them with their major; helps them develop the academic skills necessary to succeed (analytical ability and critical thinking); provides grounding in the culture and values of the University community; and helps them develop interpersonal skills—in short, familiarizes students with all skills needed to become a successful university student. Prereq. Freshman standing.

ARTF 1102. Color 1 Foundation. 1 Hour.

Examines subtractive color. Introduces optical phenomena of color pigment, reflected color. Studies hue, value, and saturation and their implications for color interaction, legibility, and spatial illusion.

ARTF 1104. Color 2 Foundation. 1 Hour.

Focuses on the optical phenomena of color activity, legibility, and spatial illusion in traditional and electronic media as well as the differences between subtractive and additive color.

ARTF 1120. Observational Drawing. 4 Hours.

Focuses on developing an understanding of the structure of object and figure through freehand drawing. Offers students an opportunity to explore a wide range of materials, including wash, charcoal, and pencil.

ARTF 1121. Conceptual Drawing. 4 Hours.

Seeks to expand the student’s knowledge and skills through a mark-making process. Offers students an opportunity to begin to understand the relationship between form and meaning while relating the drawing process to broader concepts of communication.

ARTF 1122. 2D Fundamentals: Surface and Drawing. 4 Hours.

Offers an opportunity to discover and research basic principles, language, and concepts inherent in two-dimensional visual systems. Offers students an opportunity to learn to think critically, analyze, and apply basic principles to design and art projects. In a studio workshop setting, three primary phases explore art, design, and photography. Coreq. ARTF 1123.

ARTF 1123. 2D Tools. 1 Hour.

Introduces skills and software, such as Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator, used in creating and manipulating pixel- and vector-based images, in a technology workshop format. Coreq. ARTF 1122.

ARTF 1124. 3D Fundamentals: Structure and Drawing. 4 Hours.

Continues ARTF 1122. Explores three-dimensional form. Examines principles including mass, volume, line, plane, and texture. Introduces basic materials and structure through constructing models and prototypes. Presents sequential exercises with simple eye/hand skills and form recognition. Explores complex projects that require an understanding of context, content, and developing original forms. Coreq. ARTF 1125.

ARTF 1125. 3D Tools. 1 Hour.

Introduces skills and software used in creating 3D forms with the computer. Explores basics of 3D modeling, surfacing, lighting, and rendering in this technology workshop. Coreq. ARTF 1124.

ARTF 1140. Understanding Art. 4 Hours.

Offers an introduction to the characteristics of the visual arts including painting, sculpture, graphic arts, and architecture. Studies various examples of works of art as means of understanding style and techniques. Includes visits to museum collections and contemporary art galleries. Prereq. Not open to majors or selected combined majors in the Department of Art + Design.

ARTF 2220. 4D Fundamentals: Sequence and Drawing. 4 Hours.

Explores time-based art and design in an introductory lecture/studio format. Introduces formal, narrative, and alternative concepts for creative time-based communication. Assignments investigate video, animation, and a mixture of media in a screen based context. Coreq. ARTF 2221.

ARTF 2221. 4D Tools. 1 Hour.

Introduces skills and software used in animating 2D and 3D images, graphics, and forms. Explores the basics of key framing, layering, parenting, 3D modeling, surfacing, and rigging in this technology workshop. Coreq. ARTF 2220.

ARTF 2223. 5D Fundamentals: Experience and Drawing. 4 Hours.

Explores the language of interactive experience as a compelling medium to communicate meaning. Examines how variables within the environment can change how we inhabit an experience physically, conceptually, and emotionally. Studies historical and contemporary examples of art and design projects designed as exchanges or experiences. Incorporates drawing as a means to understand the present and project potential future experiences. Coreq. ARTF 2224.

ARTF 2224. 5D Tools. 1 Hour.

Introduces skills and software used in creating basic Web-based content. This technology workshop introduces software using HTML and style sheets such as Adobe Dreamweaver. Coreq. ARTF 2223.

Art - Design Courses

ARTG 1250. Design Process Context and Systems. 4 Hours.

Explores common design practices, principles, and vocabularies, introducing the design process as a method of inquiry and problem solving through studio projects. Emphasizes the importance of an awareness of audience and context in the creation of meaningful communications and experiences. Explores the practice of design as an iterative process, offering students an opportunity to obtain an understanding of the value of systems thinking and the importance of feedback and exchange as a means for assessing the quality of design’s effectiveness in helping users achieve their goals.

ARTG 1255. Design Process Context and Systems Abroad. 4 Hours.

Explores common design practices, principles, and vocabularies, introducing the design process as a method of inquiry and problem solving through studio projects. Emphasizes the importance of an awareness of audience and context in the creation of meaningful communications and experiences. Explores the practice of design as an iterative process, offering students an opportunity to obtain an understanding of the value of systems thinking and the importance of feedback and exchange as a means for assessing the quality of design’s effectiveness in helping users achieve their goals. Taught abroad.

ARTG 1990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

ARTG 2250. Typography 1. 4 Hours.

Introduces typography as the basis of graphic design and visual communication. Guides students through an understanding of letterforms, words, sentences, and text as both image and information. Studies form, context, and visual meaning. Introduces use of the typographic grid and issues of hierarchy and legibility through assigned projects, readings, and lectures. Includes the historical evolution of typefaces and their classification as a rational system. Prereq. ARTF 1122. Coreq. ARTG 2251.

ARTG 2251. Type Tools. 1 Hour.

Offers students an opportunity to acquire technical software skills used in typesetting, such as Adobe InDesign, in this introductory lab. Coreq. ARTG 2250.

ARTG 2252. Graphic Design 1. 4 Hours.

Explores graphic form and vocabulary through the development of icons and symbols. Applies graphic design principles to the correlation of forms with their function, content, and context. Incorporates a variety of media as visual communication elements. Prereq. ARTF 1122.

ARTG 2260. Programming Basics. 4 Hours.

Exposes students to basic programming design for user interfaces. Offers students an opportunity to become familiar with the logical elements of programming languages. Through lectures, hands-on in-class exercises, and modular projects, explores Web-based design and programming solutions for managing interaction and animation.

ARTG 2300. Business Literacy for Design and Media. 4 Hours.

Provides students with a toolkit that offers insight into how companies operate, what their managements do, and how success is measured. Exposes students to creative rights issues and professional paths they might pursue—employee, freelancer, and entrepreneur. Evaluates various company cultures and offers students an opportunity to assess their personal career fit.

ARTG 2400. Interaction Design 1: Responsive. 4 Hours.

Applies information design principles to Web and mobile interface design. Explores user-centered interface and programming design strategies for the delivery of responsive data-driven websites. Discusses audience definition, content development, information structuring, and navigation. Emphasizes tools and strategies for design, such as site maps, wireframes, prototypes, usability testing, and iterative development. Offers students an opportunity to obtain meaningful interactive experiences through team-based projects. Prereq. ARTF 2223. Coreq. ARTG 2401.

ARTG 2401. Interaction Design Tools. 1 Hour.

Introduces skills and software used in designing and developing Web-based interactive environments. Explores Web-page scripting and tagging, CSS-based design coding, options for front- and back-end page design connections, and alternative technologies. Coreq. ARTG 2400.

ARTG 2990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

ARTG 3250. Physical Computing. 4 Hours.

Explores the communication between the physical world and the interactive, computer-based interface. Examines the potential of reactive analog and digital devices embedded within the physical realm. Offers students an opportunity to use simple kit sensors and indicators designed to enable student teams to create interfaces triggered by gesture, bodily movement, physical forces, and other tangible actions. Concludes with discussions of more complex interactive devices, the relationship between physical computing and robotics, and possible future directions. Prereq. ARTG 2400 or IM 2400.

ARTG 3350. Typography 2. 4 Hours.

Continues ARTG 2250, exploring structures and hierarchies through increasing typographic complexity. Investigates meaning, legibility, and readability with an emphasis on voice, organization, sequence, and the typographic grid. Prereq. ARTG 2250.

ARTG 3351. Time-Based Design. 4 Hours.

Introduces principles of time-based media—such as anticipation, interval, succession, and rhythm—through a series of analog and digital projects. Explores the potential of communicating information over time with a focus on kinetic typography and visual/sonic narratives. Examines concepts from film, music, and other related time-based arts through assignments, lectures, and student presentations. Prereq. ARTF 2220 and ARTG 3350.

ARTG 3352. Interaction Design Basics. 4 Hours.

Introduces basic principles of interactive design, such as orientation, navigation, hierarchy, categorization, user expectation, usability, and responsiveness. Explores these concepts through the creation of Web-based user interfaces. Prereq. ARTF 2223, ARTG 2250, and junior or senior standing.

ARTG 3450. Graphic Design 2. 4 Hours.

Investigates the range of conceptual possibilities inherent in the merging of words/text with images/symbols through the understanding of how their relationship can enhance meaning and comprehension. Explores visual poetry, choices in mark and form, and applied semiotics through projects, readings, and lectures/discussions. Prereq. ARTG 2252.

ARTG 3451. Information Design 1. 4 Hours.

Introduces basic concepts, methods, and procedures of information design with a focus on mapping information. Students investigate visual systems and information structures such as maps, graphs, charts, and diagrams. Emphasizes the creative process of organizing, visualizing, and communicating data by making complex information easier to understand and use. Prereq. ARTG 3350 and junior or senior standing.

ARTG 3460. Identity and Brand Design. 4 Hours.

Continues ARTG 3450. Offers students an opportunity to develop the skills needed to critically examine and design logos, marketing materials, and advertising programs that establish and promote institutional and corporate identity. Examines the historical development of classic identity programs and the role of seminal identity designers in the evolution of the practice of identity design and the design of branded environments. Prereq. ARTG 3450.

ARTG 3461. Service Design. 4 Hours.

Addresses the challenges and opportunities in designing human-centered, memorable services. Uses case studies from diverse industries such as healthcare, transportation, banking, and retail. Introduces research and design methods such as scenario mapping, prototyping, and service enactment as means to observe and craft touchpoints throughout the service experience. Prereq. ARTF 2223.

ARTG 3462. Experience Design 1. 4 Hours.

Investigates a wide range of design research methods and means of representing user intentions and actions in order to develop coherent designs based on the needs of the user. Includes use of context assessment, user experience audits, and scenario development as means to understand the motivations, behaviors, and values of audiences and participants. Prereq. ARTG 1250.

ARTG 3463. Experience Design 2. 4 Hours.

Continues ARTG 3462 processes and strategies for creating compelling human-centered experiences. Offers students an opportunity to use design processes from multiple disciplines to develop real-world solutions. Prereq. ARTG 3462.

ARTG 3465. Experience Design 1 Abroad. 4 Hours.

Investigates a wide range of design research methods and means of representing user intentions and actions in order to develop coherent designs based on the needs of the user. Includes use of context assessment, user experience audits, and scenario development as a means to understand the motivations, behaviors, and values of audiences and participants. Taught abroad.

ARTG 3500. Transmedia Design. 4 Hours.

Examines how marketing, advertising, and media strategies developed across multiple media inform design and communication strategy. Topics include advertising narratives, brand development, management, and translation of branding across multiple media. Prereq. ARTH 1100 or IM 1110.

ARTG 3700. Interaction Design 2: Mobile. 4 Hours.

Explores user-centered interface design for information exchanges using handheld and mobile devices. Studies the potentials for leveraging both the social and locative possibilities of mobile devices through research, discussions, and project assignments. Prereq. ARTG 2400 or IM 2400.

ARTG 3990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

ARTG 4500. Portfolio Workshop. 1 Hour.

Designed to provide guidance in defining criteria for professional presentation of art and design work, including considerations for portfolio organization and form. Lectures and discussions are designed to give an overview of best practices in the creation of digital as well as physical portfolios. Prereq. Design, graphic design, and multimedia studies majors only.

ARTG 4550. Design Degree Project 1. 4 Hours.

Draws on a range of theoretical and critical texts that address current issues and research methodologies in graphic design. This course is writing intensive and offers students an opportunity to complete weekly writing assignments and to visit local design studios, galleries, and museums. Writings and discussions are designed to lead to identification of a focus for ARTG 4551. Prereq. (a) ENGW 1111, ENGW 1102, ENGL 1111, or ENGL 1102 and (b) junior or senior standing; design majors and graphic design majors only.

ARTG 4551. Design Degree Project 2. 4 Hours.

Forms the graphic design major capstone together with ARTG 4550. This intensive research-driven studio explores the realm of designing authorship. A single project theme extends in phases through an entire term to mirror the development sequence of complex professional design projects. Essential to the process is that the medium is not predetermined. Offers students an opportunity to investigate a topic of their choice, author and edit content, and determine the most effective medium for their message, which they design to resonate with a specific audience. Central to the course is a substantive written problem definition and proposal designed to integrate each student’s academic and design experience. Prereq. ARTG 3350, ARTG 3451, ARTG 4550, and junior or senior standing; design majors and graphic design majors only.

ARTG 4552. Information Design 2. 4 Hours.

Builds on concepts from ARTF 2223 and ARTG 3451. Offers students an opportunity to develop strategies for structuring and communicating complex information to increase understanding through dynamic states, which are controlled through the interaction of end users. Explores possibilities offered by interfaces that mediate between a person and information space through research, projects, readings, and discussions. Prereq. (a) ARTG 2400, ARTG 3352, or IM 2400 and (b) ARTG 3451 and (c) junior or senior standing.

ARTG 4553. Environmental Design. 4 Hours.

Explores visual communication as experienced in the time-space continuum. Projects investigate social issues that contribute to shaping the concept of spaces, such as public art installations, interpretive exhibits, and wayfinding. Prereq. ARTG 3451 and junior or senior standing.

ARTG 4554. Typography 3. 4 Hours.

Offers an advanced course exploring a variety of typographical solutions, including expressive formal and complex content-based projects. Prereq. ARTG 3350.

ARTG 4700. Interaction Team Degree Project 1. 4 Hours.

Offers the first course in a two-term capstone sequence. Offers students an opportunity to work in interdisciplinary teams to define, research, design, plan, and implement a large-scale interactive project. The project concept and preliminary work are completed in this course, and the final project is produced in ARTG 4701. Prereq. ARTG 2400, ARTG 3352, or IM 2400; restricted to selected Art + Design majors and combined majors.

ARTG 4701. Interaction Team Degree Project 2. 4 Hours.

Continues ARTG 4700. Realizes the interactive project that was planned and designed in ARTG 4700. Prereq. ARTG 4700; restricted to selected Art + Design majors and combined majors.

ARTG 4990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

ARTG 5100. Information Design Studio 1—Principles. 4 Hours.

Explores the theories and practices of information design through studio projects. Investigates visual systems and information structures such as maps, timelines, charts, and diagrams. Emphasizes the creative process of organizing, visualizing, and communicating data by seeking to make complex information easier to understand and use. Prereq. Graduate standing.

ARTG 5110. Information Design History. 4 Hours.

Investigates the history of visualization practices across disciplines and in relation to technology developments. Critically examines seminal visualizations in social, cultural, and technological contexts by means of discussions and writing activities in a seminar format. Prereq. Graduate standing.

ARTG 5120. Information Design Research Methods. 4 Hours.

Examines qualitative and quantitative research methods pertinent to information communication systems. Through discussion and writing activities, offers students an opportunity to investigate varied inquiry toward the development of researchable questions, argument formation, and assessment methodologies. Prereq. Graduate standing.

ARTG 5130. Visual Communication for Information Design. 4 Hours.

Explores graphic and typographic theory, principles, and practices. Introduces students to visual communication design with a primary focus on typography as the fundamental means of conveying content. Readings locate design and typography within the larger history of visual art and writing development. Covers methods of organizing content through hierarchy and spatial organization of grid structures. Considers relationships between positive and negative space, depth perception, transparency, and color theory. Prereq. Information design and visualization students only.

ARTG 5310. Visual Cognition. 4 Hours.

Introduces human visual cognition as it applies to information design and visualization. Focuses on perception, attention, pattern recognition, information acquisition, memory, and creation of mental models. Explores reasoning, cognition, decision making, and problem solving in relation to visual artifacts. Prereq. Graduate standing.

ARTG 5320. Statistics Basics for Designers. 4 Hours.

Offers design students an opportunity to obtain the necessary skills to collect, summarize, analyze, and interpret data. Introduces concepts and methods in statistical reasoning and analysis. Topics include data mining, comparison, assessment, and delivery. Prereq. Graduate standing.

ARTG 5330. Visualization Technologies. 4 Hours.

Introduces programming languages that allow computational analysis and digital delivery of dynamic information. Examines implications of environmental and personal sensor data sources, mobile collection and analysis of data, real-time networked data sets, and social use of shared data visualization tools. Prereq. Graduate standing.

ARTG 5600. Experience Design Studio 1—Principles. 4 Hours.

Offers a context for a cohesive experience through interaction, movement, and understanding, which builds on previous knowledge of audiences and applications. Offers students hands-on project development of systems, artifacts, communication, environments, or service offerings focusing on the unique personal experience of the audience exposed to the semester-long project. Experience design is a holistic approach to design that investigates the human experience in specific situations to improve its quality, given an understanding of human goals, needs, and desires. Offers students an opportunity to develop competency in tools used to create the various elements that create the context for experiences in specific situations and events. Prereq. Graduate standing, also undergraduate seniors with permission of instructor.

ARTG 5610. Design Systems. 4 Hours.

Explores a systems-based perspective on our environment by addressing questions that are fundamental to design practice: What is a system, and what are the different types? How do we observe, analyze, and represent systems? What interactions can we have with systems and what are the different types of interaction? Explores structures and processes for the design of systemic relationships between people, artifacts, environments, and activities. Systems may be physical, virtual, social, or a combination. Through discussion, writing, diagramming, and project exercises, offers students an opportunity to learn principles of systems theory and explore the connection between design methods and systems thinking. Prereq. Graduate standing, also undergraduate seniors with permission of instructor.

ARTG 5620. Notational Systems for Experience. 4 Hours.

Examines theoretical foundations, concepts, and methods of visual notational systems used in the effective analysis and communication of existing experiences and in the envisioning of conditions for future experiences. Notational systems are sets of graphic signs and codes that denote or prescribe specific actions, forces, operations, events, or performances that occur over time. Students engage with concepts and models through readings, discussion, case study analyses, and speculative design projects. Evaluates the role that notational systems play in documenting, analyzing, and understanding the human goals, actions, behaviors, and perceptions key to experience and assesses their value in designing for agency and new experiences. Prereq. Graduate standing, also undergraduate seniors with permission of instructor; understanding a design process and knowledge of studio critique practices are recommended.

Art - History Courses

ARTH 1100. Interactive Media and Society. 4 Hours.

Offers a critical historical survey of interactive media from analog to digital techniques and from physical to virtual spaces. Examines the social, ethical, and cultural impact of interactive media. Concludes with a study of current issues and directions in interactive media. Through weekly lectures, research projects, and critical analyses, offers students an opportunity to consider current and historical aspects of interactive media and design.

ARTH 1110. Global Art and Design History: Ancient to Medieval. 4 Hours.

Investigates the history of painting, sculpture, design, and related arts through a study of masterpieces from prehistoric times to the end of the Middle Ages. Offers students an opportunity to become familiar with specific works, styles, and terminology of art and design and to develop an ability to communicate about the visual arts.

ARTH 1111. Global Art and Design History: Renaissance to Modern. 4 Hours.

Explores the evolving history of painting, sculpture, design, and related arts through a study of masterpieces from the Renaissance to the present. Offers students an opportunity to become familiar with specific works, styles, and terminology of art and design and to develop an ability to communicate about the visual arts.

ARTH 1990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

ARTH 2210. Modern Art and Design History. 4 Hours.

Surveys modernist movements from early to mid-twentieth century. Emphasizes the reciprocal evolution of art and design within cultural and social context. Prereq. ENGW 1111, ENGW 1102, ENGL 1111, or ENGL 1102.

ARTH 2211. Contemporary Art and Design History. 4 Hours.

Offers a study of contemporary culture in an art and design survey from mid-twentieth century to present. Presents a thematic approach to late-modern and postmodernist movements, focusing on interrelationships among media. Prereq. ENGW 1111, ENGW 1102, ENGL 1111, or ENGL 1102.

ARTH 2212. Survey of the Still and Moving Image. 4 Hours.

Examines the history of still and moving images in relationship to other artistic, documentary, and journalistic practices.

ARTH 2213. Nineteenth-Century Art. 4 Hours.

Explores art from 1780 to 1900. Considers developments such as neoclassicism, romanticism, realism, impressionism, and symbolism in terms of major changes in society: industrialization, Parisian urbanism, photography, Japonisme, the status of women, and the institutions of art. Emphasizes French painting, but developments in Europe and the Americas are considered. Includes museum visits. .

ARTH 2214. American Art. 4 Hours.

Surveys the history of American painting and sculpture. Explores the social and cultural forces as well as the aesthetic and intellectual concerns that shape the evolution of art in the United States. Includes visits to museums and galleries.

ARTH 2215. History of Graphic Design. 4 Hours.

Follows a chronological survey of graphic design from 4000 bc to the beginning of the twenty-first century, emphasizing work from 1880 to 2000, and the relationship of that work to other visual arts and design disciplines. Demonstrates how graphic design has responded to (and affected) international, social, political, and technological developments since 1450. Traces developments in the areas of typography and publication, persuasion, identity, information, and theory.

ARTH 2217. American Animation Film. 4 Hours.

Considers the history and influence of American animation as a once- and still-thriving form. Covers topics including the link between modernism and graphic-based animation, the paradigm shift from Disney to Warner Brothers and MGM during the “golden age” (1928–1958), the rise of underground comix and alternative animation of the 1960s–1970s, the status of animation in relation to live-action film (from avant-garde practices to slapstick comedy), the relationships between American and international animation, and the current revolution in CGI and television animation.

ARTH 2220. Recitation for ARTH 2210. 0 Hours.

Convenes at galleries and museums to experience, study, and discuss works of art.

ARTH 2990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

ARTH 3990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

ARTH 4500. Arts of the African Diaspora. 4 Hours.

Traces the historical development of the art forms and production practices of the African Diaspora, from traditional to contemporary styles in Africa, the Americas, and elsewhere in the African Diaspora. Emphasizes the study of art objects, the historical and social context in which aesthetic issues are shaped, and the impact of religion and external forces on creativity. Uses lectures, critiques, discussions, fieldwork, and hands-on interaction with art objects. Prereq. Junior or senior standing.

ARTH 4990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

ARTH 5100. Contemporary Art Theory and Criticism. 4 Hours.

Introduces the major critical and philosophical approaches that have transformed the reception, interpretation, and production of contemporary art since the 1960s. Examines a range of key interpretive methodologies—including modernism, postmodernism, psychoanalysis, feminism, Marxism, poststructuralism and deconstruction, critical race theory, visual studies, and globalism—designed to provide practitioners with the means to critically frame their own art making within contemporary debates about the meaning and social functions of art. Prereq. Senior or graduate standing.

ARTH 5200. Issues in Contemporary Art. 4 Hours.

Introduces the major artists, movements, and issues that have redefined contemporary art since the late twentieth century. Examines, both critically and historiographically, topics such as conceptualism, earth art, appropriation, installation, street art, identity politics, activist art, performance, globalism, relational art, and new media. Offers an overview aimed at helping students negotiate the relationship between their own artistic practice and global art worlds. Prereq. Senior or graduate standing.

ARTH 5300. Postmodernism: Theory and Practice in the Visual Arts. 4 Hours.

Surveys the emergence and evolution of postmodernism’s challenge to modernism through the work of theorists, critics, and visual artists. Explores recent claims that our current globalized and digitized era has generated a new, “post-postmodern” stage of cultural production. Requires students to develop an original intensive research topic, analyze methods of presentation, and present the topic in written form. Prereq. (a) ENGW 1111, ENGW 1102, ENGL 1111, ENGL 1102, or graduate standing and (b) senior standing or graduate standing.

ARTH 5400. Contemporary Visual Culture. 4 Hours.

Explores the implications of the erosion of the traditional boundary between fine art and mass culture for artistic theory and practice as well as art’s place in an increasingly globalized world. Situates contemporary artistic practice within the broader context of visual culture—including film, television, advertising, architecture, and the Internet. Prereq. Senior or graduate standing.

ARTH 5500. Art and New Media: History and Theory. 4 Hours.

Surveys the impact of the emergence and evolution of new media technologies on the production, circulation, and criticism of art in the late twentieth century and in the twenty-first century. Topics include video art, multimedia installation, digital photography, and Internet art, as well as the critical and theoretical frameworks that inspired and responded to them.

ARTH 5902. Special Topics in Art and Design History. 4 Hours.

Offers an opportunity for the intensive study of specialized themes in areas of research in art history, aesthetics, or critical studies. Format and content are determined by the instructor in this elective in Art + Design history. Prereq. Senior or graduate standing.

Art - Studio Courses

ARTS 1990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

ARTS 2330. Sculpture Basics. 4 Hours.

Offers a studio course with an in-depth exploration into the process of creating sculpture. Builds on the introductory experience of ARTF 1124, with more advanced 3D concepts, materials, tools, and techniques. Emphasizes personal exploration, concept development, and creative innovation. Exposes students to sculpture through lectures, demonstrations, critiques, and hands-on assignments. Prereq. (a) ARTF 1124 or permission of instructor and (b) sophomore standing or above.

ARTS 2340. Painting Basics. 4 Hours.

Presents an introductory studio course in the fundamental techniques of painting. Formal problems in the study of color, light, space systems, form, and composition establish the foundation for more individual creative expression. Uses critiques and slide lectures as needed.

ARTS 2341. Figure Drawing. 4 Hours.

Focuses on developing the student’s awareness of the structure of the figure as well as the emotive qualities of “figuration.” Students draw from a model in each class. They also develop drawings based on the political and social concerns of contemporary culture and the role of gender as seen through “image.”.

ARTS 2990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

ARTS 3449. Drawing in Mixed Media. 4 Hours.

Offers an upper-level course designed for students who want to explore the ever-changing discipline of drawing, which has now become a medium that stands on its own. Explores a range of media for generating drawings, including traditional techniques and computer-based media. Emphasizes open-ended application and interpretation of drawing as a medium. Requires students to attend lectures and exhibitions and keep a journal.

ARTS 3990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

ARTS 4540. Art Degree Project 1. 4 Hours.

Draws on a range of theoretical and critical texts that address current issues and methodologies in art. Offers students an opportunity to complete writing assignments and to visit local artist studios, galleries, and museums. Writing and discussions are designed to lead to identification of a focus for ARTS 4541. Prereq. (a) ENGW 1111, ENGW 1102, ENGL 1111, or ENGL 1102 and (b) senior standing; art majors only.

ARTS 4541. Art Degree Project 2. 4 Hours.

Introduces nontraditional art concepts in an intensive studio course. Includes categories of performance art, installation art, electronic art, multimedia, and kinetic art. Using their own frames of reference and experience, students contribute to a collaborative project and are responsible for keeping a journal that helps them formulate their ideas. Students reflect upon their co-op, internships, and other art-related experiences in a written essay that accompanies their final product. Prereq. ARTS 4540 and junior or senior standing; art majors only.

ARTS 4990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

ARTS 4992. Directed Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers independent work under the direction of members of the department on a chosen topic. Course content depends on instructor.

ARTS 4997. Thesis. 4 Hours.

Focuses on the production of a twenty- to thirty-page thesis. Students do individual research under the direction of a faculty member on art-historical topics appropriate to their personal and professional interests. Conceived for art majors who are completing the Bachelor of Arts degree and whose primary interest is in art history. Fulfills the Arts and Sciences experiential education requirement for art/art history.

ARTS 5100. Visual Ideation. 4 Hours.

Explores drawing in a variety of media that communicate critical and analytical thinking about arts in the public sphere. Offers students an opportunity to learn how to use drawing and visualization to communicate effectively in a variety of media, either on paper or in digital media. Students can use collage, photo, digital media, and freehand drawing to express ideas for larger environmental and public projects. (Drawing is the way that artists such as Christo propose large-scale projects and is a viable way to secure acceptance of an idea.) Prereq. Senior or graduate standing; arts, media and design students only.

School of Museum of Fine Arts Courses

SMFA 3000. Museum of Fine Arts Studio. 2-12 Hours.

Offers course work at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts.

SMFA 4000. Museum of Fine Arts Capstone. 2-12 Hours.

Offers capstone course work at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts.