PSY 1050. Introduction to Behavioral Health Science Professions. (3 Hours)

Introduces students to the major and to the landscape of behavioral health professions. Offers students an opportunity to consider their professional track and to begin formulating goals. Acclimates students to the Northeastern network, including how to access the professional, interpersonal, and academic resources available. Introduces students to their faculty advisors and fellow students and describes available experiential learning opportunities. Familiarizes students with undergraduate research and technological resources. Introduces the mindsets, dispositions, and competencies to support academic, professional, and personal sustainability.


PSY 1100. Foundations of Psychology. (3 Hours)

Surveys the fundamental principles, concepts, and issues in the major areas of contemporary scientific psychology. Approaches the study of psychology as a method of inquiry as well as a body of knowledge. Offers students an opportunity to obtain a basis for more advanced study of the science of psychology. Examines origins and methods of psychology, including neuroscience, consciousness, cognition, development, nature and nurture debate, psychosocial development, learning and memory, language, motivation, personality, group dynamics, therapy, health psychology, and psychological disorders.

Attribute(s): NUpath Natural/Designed World


PSY 1990. Elective. (1-4 Hours)

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions. May be repeated without limit.


PSY 2110. Principles of Human Learning. (3 Hours)

Presents the basic learning principles that permit humans to adapt effectively to a changing environment. Covers the science of how humans learn and the research and techniques of classical and operant conditioning with discussions of discrimination and generalization, biological constraints on learning, and other related topics. Relates learning principles to the understanding and treatment of behavioral, affective, cognitive, and motivational disorders.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 1100 with a minimum grade of D-


PSY 2230. Stress, Resilience, and Behavior Change. (3 Hours)

Offers a research-experiential approach to understanding the benefits and negative consequences of stress and its effects on human behavior and physiology. Discusses the work of researchers and practitioners in stress response. Topics include the relation of stress to health, communication, relationships, and academic and work performance. Examines the behavioral strategies associated with leveraging the stress response in personal and professional arenas. Considers perspectives of resilience, coping, and behavioral change from various social and cultural standpoints.


PSY 2240. Human Sexuality and Love. (3 Hours)

Focuses on the historical, biological, psychological, developmental, and social/cultural influences on human sexuality and its expression. Sexuality lies at the core of our identities as human beings, yet many adults are uninformed of basic aspects of sexual anatomy and function. Topics include sexual anatomy and physiology, contraception and abortion, pregnancy and childbirth, gender identity, role and expression, romantic love, sexual minorities, media impact on sexuality, and attitudes toward contemporary issues.


PSY 2300. Human Behavior and Decision Making. (4 Hours)

Introduces learners to fundamentals of individual reasoning and decision making. Begins by introducing underlying factors that influence decision making, such as personality, emotions and emotional intelligence, perception, and attribution. Explores the impact of situational variables on human behavior and decision making. Applies these concepts to the study of human logic, decision-making processes, and common decision-making biases. Addresses the role of these topics in enabling organizational resilience.


PSY 2500. Applied Behavior Analysis 1. (3 Hours)

Focuses on how to facilitate significant behavior change in applied settings using foundational principles of behavior analysis to spur on effective, meaningful, and ethical change. Applied behavior analysis is a discipline that strives to understand and improve human behavior. Covers how to choose, identify, and effectively employ reinforcers, foundations of behavior assessment, and development of function-based interventions.


PSY 2990. Elective. (1-4 Hours)

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions. May be repeated without limit.


PSY 3150. The Opioid Crisis. (3 Hours)

Focuses on the complexities of addiction across the life span, including the associated biological, psychological, and social factors. The exorbitant rise in rates of opioid addiction and overdoses world-wide require effective, evidence-based interventions to support the millions of individuals, families, communities, and societies affected. Examines the continuum of care model including promotion, prevention, treatment, and recovery. Topics include key risk and protective factors; co-occurring disorders; and evidence-based practices and methods of engaging diverse constituents through outreach, education, service delivery, capacity building, and systems change.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 1100 with a minimum grade of D-


PSY 3200. Social Psychology. (3 Hours)

Surveys the socialization process, including social motives, interpersonal perception, group membership and structure, gender and culture, attitudes, prejudice, and leadership. Social psychology is embedded in our professional and personal roles. Identifies key theories and frameworks to apply in today’s work and living arenas.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 1100 with a minimum grade of D- or SOC 1100 with a minimum grade of D- or (PSY 1010 with a minimum grade of D- ; PSY 1210 with a minimum grade of D- ) or (PSY 1010 with a minimum grade of D- ; PSY 1410 with a minimum grade of D- ) or (PSY 1210 with a minimum grade of D- ; PSY 1410 with a minimum grade of D- )


PSY 3210. Abnormal Psychology. (3 Hours)

Covers diagnosis, symptomatology, etiology, and therapy of anxiety, somatoform, and dissociative disorders. Introduces the major forms of psychotherapy, including psychoanalysis and client-centered, behavioral, and cognitive therapy.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 1100 with a minimum grade of D- or (PSY 1010 with a minimum grade of D- ; PSY 1210 with a minimum grade of D- ) or (PSY 1010 with a minimum grade of D- ; PSY 1410 with a minimum grade of D- ) or (PSY 1210 with a minimum grade of D- ; PSY 1410 with a minimum grade of D- )


PSY 3220. Cognition and Language. (3 Hours)

Offers an in-depth analysis of human cognition and language. Topics include pattern recognition, attention, memory, categorization and concept formation, problem solving, and aspects of cognitive development. Examines current theories of cognitive processing and related experimental findings. Introduces psycholinguistics, the nature and structure of language, its biological bases, acquisition, production, and perception.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 1100 with a minimum grade of D- or (PSY 1010 with a minimum grade of D- ; PSY 1210 with a minimum grade of D- ) or (PSY 1010 with a minimum grade of D- ; PSY 1410 with a minimum grade of D- ) or (PSY 1210 with a minimum grade of D- ; PSY 1410 with a minimum grade of D- )


PSY 3230. Development across the Life Span. (3 Hours)

Explores change throughout the life span. Focuses on the basic physical, perceptual, cognitive, and emotional capacities that develop from infancy through late adulthood. Emphasizes how biological inheritance interacts with the physical and social environment. Explores individual and cross-cultural differences in patterns of development.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 1100 with a minimum grade of D- or (PSY 1010 with a minimum grade of D- ; PSY 1210 with a minimum grade of D- ) or (PSY 1010 with a minimum grade of D- ; PSY 1410 with a minimum grade of D- ) or (PSY 1210 with a minimum grade of D- ; PSY 1410 with a minimum grade of D- )


PSY 3240. Sensation and Perception. (3 Hours)

Examines how our sensory organs—eyes, ears, skin, mouth, and nose—along with our sensory nervous system inform our awareness of the outside world and influence our internal perceptual world. Covers perception of light, space, form, motion, color, attention, speech, and music. Topics include visual and auditory perception, neural and anatomical bases, and early and ongoing influences on development of sensation and perception.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 1100 with a minimum grade of D- or (PSY 1010 with a minimum grade of D- ; PSY 1210 with a minimum grade of D- ) or (PSY 1010 with a minimum grade of D- ; PSY 1410 with a minimum grade of D- ) or (PSY 1210 with a minimum grade of D- ; PSY 1410 with a minimum grade of D- )


PSY 3330. Autism Spectrum Disorders. (3 Hours)

Focuses on the characteristics, theory, and teaching and intervention applications for individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Discusses approaches, trends, and etiological and diagnostic issues. By embracing an inclusionary, strengths-based approach, educational and behavioral professionals are better able to engage families through responsive instructional and intervention strategies across the life span.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 1100 with a minimum grade of D- ; PSY 2500 with a minimum grade of D-


PSY 3450. Research in Psychology. (3 Hours)

Explores research methods in psychology including observational, correlational, survey, and experimental methods. Uses the scientific method in the design, execution, analysis, and communication of psychological investigations. Discusses the ethics of research and evaluation methods. Offers students an opportunity to conduct psychological studies using a variety of methods and to write a substantial research paper.

Prerequisite(s): (MTH 2300 with a minimum grade of D- or MTH 2310 with a minimum grade of D- or MTH 3300 with a minimum grade of D- ); PSY 3200 with a minimum grade of D-

Attribute(s): NUpath Writing Intensive


PSY 3500. Applied Behavior Analysis 2. (3 Hours)

Builds upon the basic principles of applied behavior analysis presented in PSY 2500. Focuses on the necessary structures to build effective instruction and intervention for a wide range of clinical and school settings. Allows for varied applications for clients and students with addiction, developmental disabilities, autism, and related disabilities, as well as learning disabilities.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 2500 with a minimum grade of D-


PSY 3700. Behavior Measurement. (3 Hours)

Explores principles of quantitative behavior analysis with an emphasis on applying research to practice. Analyzing data and embarking upon experiential design are vital components of intervening with populations. Employs a variety of methods to explore different methodologies in behavior analysis in accordance with the current Behavior Analyst Certification Board task list.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 1100 with a minimum grade of D- ; PSY 3500 with a minimum grade of D-


PSY 3990. Elective. (1-4 Hours)

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions. May be repeated without limit.


PSY 4230. Physiological Psychology. (3 Hours)

Explores the relationship between brain function and human behavior. Introduces how nerve cells function. Topics include localization of function in the brain, perception, learning, eating behavior, motivation, and the relation of emotion to nervous system activity.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 3230 with a minimum grade of D- or (PSY 3420 with a minimum grade of D- ; PSY 3421 with a minimum grade of D- ) or (PSY 3420 with a minimum grade of D- ; PSY 3422 with a minimum grade of D- ) or (PSY 3421 with a minimum grade of D- ; PSY 3422 with a minimum grade of D- )


PSY 4310. Personality. (3 Hours)

Focuses on behavioral, dynamic, and constitutional determinants. Includes concepts such as environmental and genetic contributions, assessment of personality, research, and a survey of the major personality theories.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 1100 with a minimum grade of D-


PSY 4400. Behavior Assessment and Evaluation. (3 Hours)

Explores the methods used to identify, measure, and assess the behaviors of individuals using applied behavior analysis (ABA), including behaviors targeted for increase and decrease. In-depth topics include function-based assessment and treatment in behavior analysis; design and details of the assessment process, including selection of an appropriate assessment method; and the methodology, results, and recommendations derived from a functional behavior assessment. Explores assessments such as the DIBELS, ABLLS-R, and VB-MAPP, along with widely used instruments. The capacity to effectively analyze behavior and develop appropriate intervention strategies to bring about behavioral change is a fundamental competency for professionals.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 3500 (may be taken concurrently) with a minimum grade of D-


PSY 4440. Human Development, Teaching, and Learning. (3 Hours)

Employs an applied approach to engaging a diverse range of populations in deep, experiential learning that promotes social-emotional, cognitive, and dynamic growth across the life span. Contemporary research on learning and human development is a multidisciplinary activity that draws on psychology, anthropology, sociology, education, and cognitive science.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 1100 with a minimum grade of D-


PSY 4600. Advanced Practicum 1. (3 Hours)

Offers students an opportunity to apply behavioral principles and methods within organizational settings. Students engage in agency settings to bolster and demonstrate professional competencies needed to serve individuals, groups, organizations, and communities in our global 21st century.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 1100 with a minimum grade of D-


PSY 4700. Advanced Practicum 2. (3 Hours)

Allows students to engage in a continuing and more advanced experience in applying behavioral techniques. For students who have successfully completed PSY 4600.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 4600 with a minimum grade of D-


PSY 4850. Senior Research Seminar in Psychology. (3 Hours)

Offers students an opportunity to independently investigate a topic of interest and present their findings to their peers. This capstone course for the undergraduate curriculum should be taken as close as possible to graduation.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 3450 with a minimum grade of D-

Attribute(s): NUpath Capstone Experience, NUpath Writing Intensive


PSY 4955. Project. (1-4 Hours)

Focuses on in-depth project in which a student conducts research or produces a product related to the student’s major field. May be repeated without limit.


PSY 4990. Elective. (1-4 Hours)

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions. May be repeated without limit.