CLTR 1000. Cultures, Societies, and Global Studies at Northeastern. (1 Hour)

Introduces first-year students in the College of Social Sciences and Humanities to the liberal arts in general. Seeks to familiarize them with their major, to help them develop the academic skills necessary to succeed (analytical ability and critical thinking), to provide grounding in the culture and values of the university community, to help them develop interpersonal skills, and to familiarize them with all skills needed to become a successful university student.


CLTR 1120. Introduction to Languages, Literature, and Culture. (4 Hours)

Examines the rich interconnections between literature and language and the culture that supports them. Discusses the relationship of language to literature and investigates how language and literatures are embedded in culture. Addresses several very broad and important questions, such as the relationship between language and culture; the relationship between language and thought; the definition of cultural relativism; and how ethical dilemmas are expressed in different cultures. Explores the relationship of esthetic and rhetorical traditions in given languages to the culture from which they sprang. In this context, examines the extremely interesting case of American Sign Language and how a gestural language sheds light on these issues.

Attribute(s): NUpath Interpreting Culture


CLTR 1151. Muslim Writers and the Qur’an (in English Translations). (4 Hours)

Covers selected writers who fairly represent a wide range of Muslim attitudes to the Qur’an. Muslim writers use the Qur’an for political and social criticism, question Qur’anic texts related to the status of women, or question the authenticity of the Qur’an itself. After 9/11, however, Muslim writers in the West have presented characters who find in the Qur’an a source of positive powers. Readings are drawn from works such as the following: Leila Aboulela, Minaret; Monica Ali, Brick Lane; Gamal Al-Ghitani, Zayni Barakat; Tehmina Durrani, Blasphemy; Nuruddin Farah, Maps; Taha Hussein, An Egyptian Childhood; Yusuf Idris, “A House of Flesh”; C. H. Kane, Ambiguous Adventure; Hanif Kureishi, The Black Album and “My Son the Fanatic”; Naguib Mahfouz, The Children of the Alley.


CLTR 1240. Latin American Film. (4 Hours)

Examines contemporary works of cinematography in Latin America, focusing on the culture and imagery of the Spanish-, French-, and Portuguese-speaking peoples of the Western hemisphere, including the United States. Critically engages—from a technical (cinematographic), genre, and sociohistorical perspective—topics of history, memory, and cultural resiliency; colonialism, racism, and patriarchy; dictatorship, revolution, and democratization; and nationalism, dependency, and globalization. Conducted in English; most films are in French, Portuguese, or Spanish with English subtitles.

Attribute(s): NUpath Interpreting Culture


CLTR 1251. Dante’s Inferno and Medieval Italian Culture. (4 Hours)

Introduces an overview of Dante’s Commedia focusing on the first book, “Inferno,” read in English translation. Examines the descending stages of hell; their meanings; and their social, political, and historical relevance for Dante’s society. Dante’s Divina Commedia created a powerful world, one that had a deep meaning for both the author and the reader of that time. But can one so easily understand it as constructed by the Commedia in the Middle Ages? Does Dante’s world have relevance today as well? Some scholars may say it does more so than ever. If so, how? Through analysis of selected chapters (Canti), students have an opportunity to attempt to establish their possible relevance to the modern human condition and perhaps even to themselves.

Attribute(s): NUpath Ethical Reasoning, NUpath Interpreting Culture


CLTR 1260. Japanese Film. (4 Hours)

Provides an introduction to Japanese film through works by such great masters as Kurosawa, Mizoguchi, and Ozu, as well as works by new directors from the 1980s and 1990s such as Tami, Morita, and Suo. Studies both form and content; relates major works to Japanese culture. Conducted in English.

Attribute(s): NUpath Difference/Diversity, NUpath Interpreting Culture


CLTR 1261. Caribbean Literature and Culture. (4 Hours)

Provides a comparative introduction to the modern literary traditions of the Spanish-, English, and French-speaking Caribbean. Includes authors such as Carpentier (Cuba), Naipaul (Trinidad), Zobel (Martinique), and Cardenal (Nicaragua). Conducted in English.


CLTR 1500. Modern Chinese History and Culture. (4 Hours)

Introduces modern Chinese history and culture through literary works, films, and historical texts. Examines political, social, and cultural changes in China since 1800: the decline of empire; the New Culture Movement of the 1920s; the rise of nationalism and rural revolution; the changing roles of women; the Cultural Revolution of the 1960s; and China’s cinematic, literary, and economic engagement with the world since 1978. Taught in English and open to all undergraduates. CLTR 1500 and HIST 1500 are cross-listed.

Attribute(s): NUpath Interpreting Culture, NUpath Societies/Institutions


CLTR 1501. Introduction to French Culture. (4 Hours)

Explores contemporary France and French mentality through lectures, screenings, readings, and discussions. Topics covered include the modern vs. the traditional family, social reproduction, gender norms, culture and social distinction, the concept of “grandeur,” identity, and immigration. Offers students an opportunity to evaluate historical and sociological readings, films, documentaries, and TV commercials; to compare French and American systems; and to consider contemporary human and social behaviors in the face of globalization.

Attribute(s): NUpath Interpreting Culture, NUpath Societies/Institutions


CLTR 1502. Introduction to Arabic Culture. (4 Hours)

Designed to provide students with an in-depth survey of Arabic culture. Familiarizes students with the roots of one of the richest and oldest cultures but also seeks to satisfy their curiosity concerning certain social norms, patterns, and cultural traits in contemporary Arabic societies. Examines cultural manifestations ranging from the hijab (head covering), Jihad (holy struggle), human rights, polygamy, gender relations, public behavior, and many others by providing the historical backgrounds for these customs and traditions as well as exploring how they are now perceived in various Arab societies as well as in the West. Seeks to provide students with an appreciation for this multifaceted culture but most importantly a broad perspective on Arabic culture within the context of the universal human experience.

Attribute(s): NUpath Interpreting Culture, NUpath Societies/Institutions


CLTR 1503. Introduction to Italian Culture. (4 Hours)

Explores the construction of an Italian national cultural identity through a historical and cross-disciplinary perspective from the Middle Ages; the Renaissance; and the modern, post–WWII period. Organized into modules that focus on the major issues related to the idea of unity and division such as north and south divide, regionalism, language pluralism, fascism and dissent, criminal organizations, and migration. Conducted in English.

Attribute(s): NUpath Interpreting Culture


CLTR 1504. Cultural History of Spain. (4 Hours)

Examines chronologically the forces that have forged Spanish culture and have made Spain the pluralistic society and multinational country it is today. Traces the development of the peoples of the Iberian Peninsula from prehistoric times to the present. Based primarily on the history of ideas, the arts, and architecture, incorporates history, sociology, anthropology, geography, economics, and politics. Conducted in English.

Attribute(s): NUpath Interpreting Culture, NUpath Societies/Institutions


CLTR 1505. Latin American Culture, History, and Politics. (4 Hours)

Offers students an opportunity to learn about Latin American culture through the study of historical episodes such as colonization, independence, and dictatorships. Explores current issues including migration, globalization, and digital media. Examines writings by Latin American authors and selected films from Latin America. Conducted in English.

Attribute(s): NUpath Interpreting Culture, NUpath Societies/Institutions


CLTR 1506. Introduction to Chinese Popular Culture. (4 Hours)

Provides a comprehensive examination of modern Chinese popular culture in the People’s Republic of China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong. From film to literature, from music to theatre, this course probes popular culture as it has manifested itself and traces its sociopolitical, aesthetic, and affective impact on modern China, with special attention to negotiations between the elite and the popular discourses.


CLTR 1700. Introduction to Japanese Pop Culture. (4 Hours)

Provides an introduction to Japanese popular culture through critical analysis of mass media such as film, television, comics, and animation. Investigates various social and cultural issues, such as gender, family, and education. Films and videos supplement readings. Conducted in English.

Attribute(s): NUpath Difference/Diversity, NUpath Interpreting Culture


CLTR 1990. Elective. (1-4 Hours)

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions. May be repeated without limit.


CLTR 2001. World Cultures through Film. (4 Hours)

Introduces the study of world cinema from the past several decades as a form of artistic and cultural expression. Emphasizes the way that different ethnicities and cultures mix and even clash within national boundaries. Readings cover such topics as the postcolonial inheritance, immigration, the boundaries of class, the pressures of modernization, ethnic identities, and historical memory. Examines storytelling in its multicultural aspects and deals with the diverse influences of entertainment cinema and art cinema, as well as measures taken by countries to limit the influx of foreign films in order to protect their own cultural productivity. One overall concern of the course is the place of film in contemporary global culture.

Attribute(s): NUpath Interpreting Culture, NUpath Societies/Institutions


CLTR 2451. Postcolonial Women Writers. (4 Hours)

Examines the literature and cultures of postcolonial nations in the Caribbean, Africa, Asia, and elsewhere through the lens of gender. Designed to familiarize students with the relationships between cultural paradigms associated with gender and transnational experiences of colonialism. Focuses on the variety of artistic strategies employed by writers to communicate the impacts of gender and sexuality on contemporary postcolonial themes such as neocolonialism, nationalism, and diaspora. Writers may include Chimamanda Adichie, Nawal El Saadawi, Marjane Satrapi, Bessie Head, Arundhati Roy, Banana Yoshimoto, Sonia Singh, and Dionne Brand. ENGL 2451, WMNS 2451, and CLTR 2451 are cross-listed.

Prerequisite(s): ENGW 1111 with a minimum grade of C or ENGW 1102 with a minimum grade of C or ENGL 1111 with a minimum grade of C or ENGL 1102 with a minimum grade of C

Attribute(s): NUpath Difference/Diversity, NUpath Interpreting Culture


CLTR 2850. Apps, Memes, and Bots: Global Literature in the Age of the Internet. (4 Hours)

Introduces students to new and emerging forms of electronic literature like augmented reality applications, participatory narratives, literary apps, memes, and social media bots. Focuses on born digital literature created around the world. Explores the theories and approaches to reading electronic works in a globalized world. Offers students an opportunity to read, critique, and author works of electronic literature. Although a reading knowledge of a second language can enhance the students’ experience, the course is fully taught in English.

Attribute(s): NUpath Creative Express/Innov


CLTR 2990. Elective. (1-4 Hours)

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions. May be repeated without limit.


CLTR 3418. Nationalism. (4 Hours)

Explores contending theories of identity and nationalism—a powerful force in international and domestic politics. Examines topics such as the process of identity creation, the choice of national symbols, how group boundaries are established, the role of identity in conflict and state building, and the debate over nationalism’s constructed or primordial nature. POLS 3418 and CLTR 3418 are cross-listed.

Prerequisite(s): POLS 1155 with a minimum grade of D- or POLS 1160 with a minimum grade of D-

Attribute(s): NUpath Interpreting Culture, NUpath Societies/Institutions


CLTR 3501. Caribbean Literature and Culture. (4 Hours)

Provides a comparative introduction to the modern literary traditions of the Spanish-, English, and French-speaking Caribbean. Includes authors such as Carpentier (Cuba), Naipaul (Trinidad), Zobel (Martinique), and Cardenal (Nicaragua). Conducted in English.


CLTR 3502. Cervantes and His Times. (4 Hours)

Introduces students to Don Quixote de la Mancha, Cervantes’ major work as well as Spain’s greatest masterpiece and its supreme gift to Western culture. Studies Cervantes’ minor works, The Exemplary Novels and Interludes. Examines literary, sociological, philosophical, and historical matters: the development of the novel, genre and narratology, role-playing and representation, and Spain’s triumphs and defeats. Deals with the Spanish Inquisition and censorship, and examines themes such as madness, truth and lying, and appearance and reality. Conducted in English.

Prerequisite(s): (ENGL 1111 with a minimum grade of C or ENGL 1102 with a minimum grade of C or ENGW 1111 with a minimum grade of C or ENGW 1102 with a minimum grade of C ); SPNS 2102 with a minimum grade of D-

Attribute(s): NUpath Writing Intensive


CLTR 3503. Russian Literature in Translation. (4 Hours)

Surveys and analyzes in English the major works of Russian literature of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, with emphasis on the historical context. Selected writers include Pushkin, Gogol, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, and Chekhov.


CLTR 3520. International Perspectives. (4 Hours)

Uses major representative works of fiction from the modern European tradition to introduce students to an array of theoretical and critical perspectives (cognitivism, Marxism, formalism, and identity politics). Major authors include Dostoevsky, Mann, Kafka, Camus, Duras, and Achebe. Team-taught in English by members of the modern language department. Serves as an introduction to literature for language majors, who can get credit in their field of concentration by reading some of the works in the original language.


CLTR 3715. New Narratives: Latin America after 1989. (4 Hours)

Focuses on film, literature, and new media. This course offers a panoramic view of the Latin American cultural production after 1989, attempting to characterize the variety of styles and trends. Relates the texts and movies to the socio, political, and economic issues of the moment, i.e., implementation of neoliberal democracies, globalization, neocolonialism, resistance, new social movements, etc. Also studies links between Latin America and the United States and between Latin America and Spain. Focuses on texts written by relatively young authors. Taught in Spanish.

Prerequisite(s): SPNS 2102 with a minimum grade of D- or SPNS 3101 with a minimum grade of D- or SPNS 3102 with a minimum grade of D-


CLTR 3720. Literature, Arts, and Poverty in Latin America. (4 Hours)

Focuses on the construction, characteristics, and representation of poverty/the poor in Latin American texts from the thirties and sixties and in the works of contemporary Latin American writers and film directors. Discusses the relation of these works to a “realist tradition” by studying social, political, and cultural aspects of Latin America from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Considers whether we are facing a new kind of realism. Also engages the problem of representation, the “role of literature” (ethics and literature), and its relation with politics and the global economy (literature and the market) in the Latin American context. Taught in Spanish.

Prerequisite(s): SPNS 2102 with a minimum grade of D- or SPNS 3101 with a minimum grade of D- or SPNS 3102 with a minimum grade of D-

Attribute(s): NUpath Interpreting Culture


CLTR 3725. Representing Violence and Human Rights in Latin America. (4 Hours)

Studies the idea of violence and how it relates to the social, economic, and political situation in Latin America. Students watch films and documentaries and read novels, testimonies, short stories, and poems of several artistic movements to study how violence is represented/visualized in these texts. Also addresses the topics of historical memory and human rights by using basic theoretical texts about the concept of violence, memory, and human rights. Studies four moments in recent Latin American history: Mexico 1968, Shining Path and Peru in the 1980s and 1990s, the genocide in Guatemala, and the dictatorships in the Southern Cone. Taught in Spanish.

Prerequisite(s): SPNS 2102 with a minimum grade of D- or SPNS 3101 with a minimum grade of D- or SPNS 3102 with a minimum grade of D-

Attribute(s): NUpath Interpreting Culture


CLTR 3805. Culture, Politics, and Media in Spain. (4 Hours)

Offers an in-depth critical inquiry into the current debates in the public sphere in Spain focusing on the politics of culture and identity as they both inform and challenge the very foundations of a modern nation-state. Arguably the first political entity in modern times to have been constructed as a state unified under one religion, one people, and one monarch, Spain is today an early example of a growing tendency toward national fragmentation and disintegration. Examines the ways in which current events in Spain may be the presage to an ever more unstable world order. Considers the possibility of a higher state of global governance beyond the nation-state and empire. Taught in English.

Attribute(s): NUpath Difference/Diversity, NUpath Interpreting Culture


CLTR 3990. Elective. (1-4 Hours)

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions. May be repeated without limit.


CLTR 4550. From Knights to Revolution. (4 Hours)

Introduces major works of French literature from the Middle Ages up through the eighteenth century. Textual analysis, examination of the social and historical context of these works, and explanations of literary terms and devices through readings and class discussions are designed to contribute to the understanding and appreciation of this body of French literature.

Prerequisite(s): FRNH 3101 with a minimum grade of D-


CLTR 4551. Modern French and Francophone Literature. (4 Hours)

Introduces major works of French literature from the nineteenth century on. Textual analysis, examination of the social and historical context of these works, and explanations of literary terms and devices through readings and class discussions are designed to contribute to the understanding and appreciation of this body of French literature.

Prerequisite(s): FRNH 3101 with a minimum grade of D-


CLTR 4555. French Poetry. (4 Hours)

Provides students with a survey of French poetry through the ages, focusing on representative works of the major French poets. Studies poems in their literary and historical context with an examination of various aspects of French versification. Conducted in French.

Prerequisite(s): CLTR 4551 with a minimum grade of D- or LITR 4551 with a minimum grade of D-


CLTR 4560. Masterpieces of Spanish Literature: 18th–20th Century. (4 Hours)

Surveys the literature of eighteenth-, nineteenth-, and twentieth-century Spain. Includes the literary movements of romanticism, realism, and the Generation of ‘98. Conducted in Spanish.

Prerequisite(s): SPNS 3101 with a minimum grade of D-


CLTR 4561. Masterpieces of Spanish Literature: 12th–17th Century. (4 Hours)

Traces the development of Spanish literature from the Middle Ages (las jarchas, El poema del Cid, El libro de buen amor, La Celestina) through the Renaissance and Baroque periods or Golden Age (Garcilaso de la Vega, the picaresque novel, the mystics, Cervantes, Lope de Vega, Calderon). Conducted in Spanish.

Prerequisite(s): SPNS 3101 with a minimum grade of D-


CLTR 4565. Spanish Golden Age. (4 Hours)

Examines plays by the outstanding dramatists of the seventeenth century in Spain: Lope de Vega, Calderón de la Barca, Tirso de Molina, Ruiz de Alarcón, and others. Conducted in Spanish.

Prerequisite(s): CLTR 4560 with a minimum grade of D- or LITR 4560 with a minimum grade of D-


CLTR 4655. Latin American Literature. (4 Hours)

Offers an overview of the major trends in Latin American narrative, poetry, drama, and essays, from Bernal Diaz through Borges and Bolaño. Studies broad cultural and political contexts, especially the Cold War period and the impact of neoliberalism. Conducted in Spanish.

Prerequisite(s): SPNS 2101 with a minimum grade of D- or SPNS 2102 with a minimum grade of D- or SPNS 3101 with a minimum grade of D- or SPNS 3102 with a minimum grade of D-

Attribute(s): NUpath Interpreting Culture, NUpath Writing Intensive


CLTR 4850. The Splendid Century. (4 Hours)

Presents a study of the golden age of French literature in seventeenth-century France, spanning the baroque and classical periods, and evoking the grandeur of the era of Louis XIV and Versailles. Readings cover a rich and diverse body of literature encompassing poetry, theatre, philosophy, the novel, and epistolary writing. The authors studied include Corneille, Racine, Moliere, Descartes, Pascal, and La Rochefoucauld. Conducted in French, with English permitted.

Prerequisite(s): CLTR 4551 with a minimum grade of D- or LITR 4551 with a minimum grade of D-


CLTR 4860. Age of Enlightenment. (4 Hours)

Studies the eighteenth century in France: the Enlightenment. It was an age of challenge to established authority, institutions, and modes of thought. This intellectual and political vitality is reflected in works of Marivaux, Fontenelle, Montesquieu, and Voltaire. It is followed by the awakening of the Romantic sensibility as found in such authors as Diderot, Rousseau, and Bernardin de St. Pierre. Conducted in French, with English permitted.

Prerequisite(s): CLTR 4551 with a minimum grade of D- or LITR 4551 with a minimum grade of D-


CLTR 4870. Romantic Heritage. (4 Hours)

Treats French Romanticism and its aftermath from a literary and cultural standpoint. Examines Romanticism in poetry and drama, as well as its continuation into the realist novel. Readings include the works of Lamartine, Hugo, Balzac, and Flaubert. Also explores the development of the Parnassian and Symbolist movements. Readings include the works of Baudelaire, Verlaine, Rimbaud, and Mallarmé, precursors of all modern literature. Conducted in French, with English permitted.

Prerequisite(s): CLTR 4551 with a minimum grade of D- or LITR 4551 with a minimum grade of D-


CLTR 4944. Cultural Engagement Abroad. (4 Hours)

Designed for a language-based Dialogue of Civilizations. Complements the intensive language course that students take while on a language-based Dialogue. Offers students an opportunity to obtain an in-depth knowledge of the contemporary culture(s) of the country of the Dialogue and how that culture differs from or is similar to contemporary American cultural values and practices. In addition to regular in-class lectures and activities, offers structured opportunities to engage in dialogue with businesspeople, scholars, educators, artists, government officials, journalists, students, senior citizens, and/or local residents about their perspectives on various topics and issues. May be repeated up to three times.


CLTR 4990. Elective. (1-4 Hours)

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions. May be repeated without limit.


CLTR 4992. Directed Study. (1-4 Hours)

Offers students a way of going beyond work given in the regular curriculum; may also enable students to complete major or minor requirements in certain situations. Priority is given to language majors and to juniors and seniors. May be repeated without limit.