Sociology and Anthropology

Website

Matthew O. Hunt, PhD
Professor and Chair

500 Holmes Hall
617.373.2686
617.373.2688 (fax)
Mary Ramsey, Administrative Assistant, m.ramsey@northeastern.edu

Sociology and cultural anthropology provide the critical perspective needed for studying the social and cultural arrangements in which people live, for understanding how societies function, for investigating the conditions under which people change their institutions, and for describing the modes and conditions of cooperation that make social life possible.

Courses in the program examine such areas as urbanization, the environment, health, globalization and human rights, gender and sexuality, social movements, the cultural underpinnings of science and technology, new media, and the comparative analysis of advanced capitalist societies. Many courses are directly relevant to majors in other fields, including economics, political science, philosophy, literature, criminal justice, and business.

The major in sociology or cultural anthropology seeks to prepare students for careers in public or private service, including such fields as law, teaching, social work, administration or management, and research.

Academic Progression Standards

Same as university-wide standards described under “Academic Status.”

Preapproved Template Program in Cultural Anthropology

The Department of Sociology and Anthropology offers a preapproved template program in cultural anthropology. The template program may be paired with another preapproved template program to create a combined major; to see a list of current preapproved template programs, visit the combined majors webpage.

Students may request admission to such a combined major via the Combined Major Approval form, which requires approval by both disciplines/colleges together with an approved curriculum. For additional information on preapproved template programs, see “Student-Requested Combined Major.” For template program requirements, visit the myNEU web portal, click on the “Self-Service” tab, then on “My Degree Audit.”

PlusOne Program (MA) in Sociology

Sociology majors at the end of their sophomore year or the beginning of their junior year may qualify for application to the PlusOne program that combines the BA with the master’s degree in sociology. Students interested in this option should consult with the departmental advisor by the end of the sophomore year.

Anthropology Courses

ANTH 1000. Anthropology at Northeastern. 1 Hour.

Intended for first-year students in the College of Social Sciences and Humanities. Introduces students to liberal arts; familiarizes them with their major; develops the academic skills necessary to succeed (analytical ability and critical thinking); provides grounding in the culture and values of the University community; and helps to develop interpersonal skills—in short, familiarizes students with all skills needed to become a successful university student.

ANTH 1101. Peoples and Cultures. 4 Hours.

Surveys basic concepts in cultural anthropology by looking at a range of societies and the issues they face in a globalizing world. Examines the manner in which cultures adapt to, reject, or modify all of the changes they face. These changes impact everything from traditional family structure, to religion, gender, all the way to patterns of joking and concepts of beauty the world over.

ANTH 1990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

ANTH 2300. Reading Culture through Ethnography. 4 Hours.

Examines culture by reading some of the discipline’s best-known ethnographic works and by revisiting core anthropological themes and methods. Emphasizes critical reading practices within anthropology, how ethnographies and their subjects are constructed, and how anthropologists bring their perspectives to bear upon the study of culture. Prereq. ENGW 1111, ENGW 1102, ENGL 1111, or ENGL 1102.

ANTH 2302. Gender and Sexuality: A Cross-Cultural Perspective. 4 Hours.

Examines popular and scientific notions about sex, gender relations, family, and kinship. Examines why our images of family, masculinity, and femininity are not universal by analyzing the patterns of sex roles, sexual practices, and kinship in other cultures. Discusses how and why relations between men and women change during times of socioeconomic and political change.

ANTH 2305. Global Markets and Local Culture. 4 Hours.

Examines selected topics in the socioeconomic transformation of other cultures, including urbanization, industrialization, globalization, commodity production, and international labor migration. Focuses on the impact of global capitalist development on contemporary developing and postcolonial societies as well as local responses and/or resistances to those changes.

ANTH 2306. Global Markets and Local Cultures Abroad. 4 Hours.

Examines selected topics in the socioeconomic transformation of other cultures, including urbanization, industrialization, globalization, commodity production, and international labor migration. Focuses on the impact of global capitalist development on contemporary developing and postcolonial societies as well as local responses and/or resistance to those changes. To be taken as part of a Dialogue of Civilizations.

ANTH 2312. The Anthropology of Masculinity. 4 Hours.

Provides a cross-cultural examination of the ways in which social and cultural institutions shape men, and how men respond to those institutions. After studying the ways in which gender is constructed, the ways in which women are distinguished from men, and a history of masculinity, the course explores the range of masculinities that compete with one another for expression. Uses case studies from Latin America, Melanesia, North America, and Africa.

ANTH 2315. Religion and Modernity. 4 Hours.

Introduces a cross-cultural, comparative perspective on religious practice and belief. Explores theoretical definitions of and methodological approaches to the study of religion, as well as more specific concepts of ritual, myth, healing, and identity. Select case studies allow for an in-depth look at the unique formations of a few religious practices and groups.

ANTH 2330. Environmental Anthropology. 4 Hours.

Introduces the study of human-environment interactions over time and across cultures. Drawing on a range of scholarship from ecological anthropology, environmental history, political-economy, and environmental justice, this class examines transitions in subsistence systems and cultural factors from early hunting-gathering societies through to industrial giants in a globalizing world.

ANTH 2331. Scientific Controversies: Culture, Science, and Public Debate. 4 Hours.

Introduces the social studies of science. How and why is science vital to contemporary public controversies? Whose expertise and data should we trust and why? How do scientific facts and practices change over time? Examines public controversies in which science and scientists play a determining role (e.g., climate change, endocrine disruption, smoking and cancer, and genetic engineering). Studies how and why scientific practice creates social and ethical challenges by looking at controversies produced through scientific research, including model organisms, stem cells, and cell lines. Offers students an opportunity to learn how scientific cultures develop by performing ethnographic fieldwork within laboratories and in class projects that engage students in how scientific facts and figures are made and unmade.

ANTH 2350. Urban Anthropology. 4 Hours.

Introduces students to the anthropological literature on cities and their subjects. Explores the ways in which cities are seen as places of cultural fascination and exchange, as well as spaces of modernity and futurity. Analyzes the urban character of contemporary cultural, political, economic, and global processes that take place in cities, and provides foundational concepts to understand urban spaces, the construction of urban identities, the complexities of urban living, and the local and global significance of cities.

ANTH 2365. Sport, Culture, and Society. 4 Hours.

Looks at the ways in which sport reflects and obscures social and cultural institutions. Half of the course focuses upon American sport, and the rest upon the global character that modern sport has taken on. Case studies are used from the United States, Dominican Republic, Japan, Brazil, and elsewhere.

ANTH 2990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

ANTH 2991. Research Practicum. 2-4 Hours.

Involves students in collaborative research under the supervision of a faculty member. Offers students an opportunity to learn basic research methods in the discipline. Prereq. Sophomore standing or above and permission of instructor.

ANTH 3120. Consumer Cultures. 4 Hours.

Introduces students to anthropological theories of consumption and debates about the “social life of things.” Explores the politics invested in material objects ranging from hijab fashions in Teheran to forms of global hipsterism, debates about nationalism and commodity cultures, as well as the political economy of production and consumption. Includes, but is not limited to, commodity fetishism, value, social/cultural capital, distinction, neoliberalism, consumerism, and materiality. Prereq. SOCL 1101, ANTH 1101, CRIM 1100, HUSV 1101, INTL 1101, POLS 1140, POLS 1160, or WMNS 1103.

ANTH 3410. Ethnographic Field Experience. 4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to experience fieldwork while studying current ethnographic methods and theory and to design a semester-long ethnographic field research project. Field sites may include public and outdoor spaces, online communities, cultural centers, schools, immigrant neighborhoods, sports organizations, social service agencies, nonprofit groups, religious institutions, etc. Prereq. ANTH 1101.

ANTH 3415. Anthropology of Travel and Tourism. 4 Hours.

Examines the rationale and functions of tourism around the world. Explores the relationship between tourist and hosts from the following perspectives: kinds of tourism; the tourist “desire”; the tourist “gaze”; and the ways in which hosts manipulate the relationship. Examines the nature of what constitutes satisfaction and sustainability of tourism.

ANTH 3417. Political Anthropology. 4 Hours.

Examines the anthropology of politics, focusing on the anthropology of the state. Studies the history of political anthropology with its roots in British structural-formalism and contextualizes it within the anthropology of Africa and witchcraft. Explores the linkages between the nation and the state, using classic works of Benedict Anderson on nationalism, before commencing an in-depth study of the problems of the state, classical theories of the state and statecraft, and how these ideas are traced to contemporary ethnographies of politics. Students interested in the study of resistance, displacement, social exclusion, citizenship, state violence, and communities may find this course relevant to their interests. Prereq. SOCL 1101, ANTH 1101, CRIM 1100, HUSV 1101, INTL 1101, POLS 1140, POLS 1160, or WMNS 1103.

ANTH 3418. Wired/Unwired: Cybercultures and Technopolitics. 4 Hours.

Explores the impacts of technology and new media on politics, society, and culture. Emphasizes the socioeconomic and political frameworks within which technologies are embedded as well as the role of technology and the Internet in contemporary political and cultural movements. Topics may include the political and cultural effects of the census, the radio, and the camera; the history of the Internet; virtual worlds and communities; online politics and activism; as well as blogging, gaming, and social networking. Prereq. SOCL 1101, ANTH 1101, CRIM 1100, HUSV 1101, INTL 1101, POLS 1140, POLS 1160, or WMNS 1103.

ANTH 3421. Foundations of Anthropological Theory. 4 Hours.

Introduces the foundations of anthropological theory. Examines recurring themes surrounding structure and agency, culture and power, and the tension between the individual and society. Addresses these questions by returning to anthropology’s Enlightenment roots, early evolutionary thought, classic and contemporary theories, as well as ongoing critiques of the discipline. Explores different schools of thought, including functionalism, structural functionalism, symbolism, interpretivism, and more recent theoretical developments that address history, political economy, reflexivity, poststructuralism, and feminism, as well as transnational/global and activist approaches. Prereq. (a) ANTH 1101 and (b) two ANTH courses numbered 1000 or above.

ANTH 3990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

ANTH 4350. Ethnography of Southeast Asia. 4 Hours.

Offers a seminar on the societies and cultures of Southeast Asia. Uses an interdisciplinary approach to this diverse and dynamic geopolitical region, with readings from anthropology, history, political science, and literature. Covers the major political and cultural changes that have shaped Southeast Asia in relation to the world—from the age of colonial expansion, to the rise of nation-states, to the present global era. Examines central questions in the ethnography of Southeast Asia, emphasizing the postcolonial legacies of Southeast Asia, states and violence, culture and mobility, and pressing contemporary issues in globalizing Southeast Asia. Prereq. (a) Sophomore standing or above and (b) ANTH 1101, CRIM 1100, HUSV 1101, INTL 1101, POLS 1140, POLS 1160, SOCL 1101, or WMNS 1103. Cross-listed with INTL 4350.

ANTH 4500. Latin American Society and Development. 4 Hours.

Explores the processes of social, economic, and cultural change in Latin America. While concentrating on the present, traces class formation, agrarian structures, ethnic identity, ceremonial organization, gender roles, and political conflict since the colonial era in a range of countries. Emphasizes the relationship of communities and national political and economic systems. May emphasize Central America and Mexico or countries in South America through case studies. Prereq. (a) Sophomore standing or above and (b) SOCL 1101, ANTH 1101, CRIM 1100, HUSV 1101, INTL 1101, POLS 1140, POLS 1160, or WMNS 1103 and (c) ENGW 1111, ENGW 1102, ENGL 1111, or ENGL 1102. Cross-listed with INTL 4500.

ANTH 4505. Native North Americans. 4 Hours.

Examines Native American cultures and their reactions to Anglo-American attempts to, first, remove them from their lands and, then, incorporate them into the contemporary framework of modern America. Selects specific groups to explore contemporary issues, including native gaming, racism, gender, cultural appropriation, and economic development.

ANTH 4510. Anthropology of Africa. 4 Hours.

Explores Africa’s changing place in the world. Studies the history of Africa and explores the role of ethnography in the making of colonial Africa and the cultural transformations and continuities produced by the emergence of African cities during and after colonialism. Studies postcolonial Africa to critically and comparatively engage with contemporary issues facing African societies. Considers the efflorescence of new cultural forms of music, art, film, and literature, in conjunction with new sources of identity such as nationality, religion, ethnicity, consumption, and migration. Prereq. (a) Sophomore standing or above and (b) ANTH 1101, CRIM 1100, HUSV 1101, INTL 1101, POLS 1140, POLS 1160, SOCL 1101, or WMNS 1103 and (c) ENGW 1111, ENGW 1102, ENGL 1111, or ENGL 1102. Cross-listed with INTL 4510.

ANTH 4515. Culture and Politics in Modern India. 4 Hours.

Introduces the histories, cultures, and peoples of India. Seeks to convey a sense of how knowledge has been constructed about the region and how the subcontinent has been shaped by its engagements with the world through such processes as colonization, state building, and globalization. Uses readings, films, and class discussions to examine themes and topics that include Orientalism, postcolonialism, caste and community, gender and sexualities, conflict and violence, development and resistance, and transnational structures and processes. Critically evaluates some commonly held assumptions, including classical understandings of tradition and modernity, cohesion and conflict, and nation and identity. Prereq. (a) Sophomore standing or above and (b) SOCL 1101, ANTH 1101, CRIM 1100, HUSV 1101, INTL 1101, POLS 1140, POLS 1160, or WMNS 1103. Cross-listed with INTL 4515.

ANTH 4580. Special Topics in Anthropology. 4 Hours.

Designed as a specialized themes course for students with prior experience in anthropology and/or sociology. Offers unique opportunities—visiting guests, special thematic interests—which are not part of the regular curriculum.

ANTH 4600. Senior Seminar. 4 Hours.

Designed to deal with anthropological theory and work with students who are asked to apply these theories to some of their own work. Content may vary. Prereq. Junior or senior standing; cultural anthropology majors and international affairs and anthropology combined majors only.

ANTH 4970. Junior/Senior Honors Project 1. 4 Hours.

Focuses on in-depth project in which a student conducts research or produces a product related to the student’s major field. Combined with Junior/Senior Project 2 or college-defined equivalent for 8-credit honors project. Prereq. Junior or senior standing; cultural anthropology majors and international affairs and anthropology combined majors only.

ANTH 4971. Junior/Senior Honors Project 2. 4 Hours.

Focuses on second semester of in-depth project in which a student conducts research or produces a product related to the student’s major field. Prereq. ANTH 4970 and junior or senior standing; cultural anthropology majors and international affairs and anthropology combined majors only.

ANTH 4990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

ANTH 4991. Research. 4 Hours.

Offers an opportunity to conduct research under faculty supervision.

ANTH 4992. Directed Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers independent work under the direction of members of the department on a chosen topic. Course content depends on instructor.

ANTH 4993. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers independent work under the direction of members of the department on a chosen topic. Course content depends on instructor.

ANTH 4994. Internship. 4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity for internship work.

ANTH 4996. Experiential Education Directed Study. 4 Hours.

Offers independent work on a chosen topic under the direction of a member of the department.

ANTH 5976. Directed Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers independent work under the direction of members of the department on a chosen topic. Course content depends on instructor. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

Sociology Courses

SOCL 1000. Sociology at Northeastern. 1 Hour.

Intended for first-year students in the College of Social Sciences and Humanities. Introduces students to liberal arts; familiarizes them with their major; develops the academic skills necessary to succeed (analytical ability and critical thinking); provides grounding in the culture and values of the University community; and helps to develop interpersonal skills—in short, familiarizes students with all skills needed to become a successful university student.

SOCL 1101. Introduction to Sociology. 4 Hours.

Explores basic concepts and theories concerning the relation between individuals and society. Emphasizes the influence of culture, social structure, and institutions in explaining human activity. Discusses and analyzes social groups, socialization, community, class, power, and social change, among other substantive issues.

SOCL 1102. Sex, Gender, and Popular Culture. 4 Hours.

Examines how femininities, masculinities, and different forms of sexual identity are produced and represented within popular culture. Using theories and concepts from both feminist/sexuality studies and popular culture studies, analyzes popular texts and media for their treatment of gender and sexuality and the intersection of those categories with racial and class identities. Explores the visual representation of women (and men) and analyzes how visual and textual media shape our attitudes and identities. Required reading and assignments include close readings of texts, film screenings, class discussions and activities, writing assignments, and creative projects. Cross-listed with WMNS 1101.

SOCL 1103. Women’s Studies. 4 Hours.

Surveys the issues and methodologies involved in the interdisciplinary study of women. Examines the political, economic, social, and historical processes that have created both the image and the reality of women in societies. Guest lecturers provide an overview of the diverse disciplinary approaches to the study of women.

SOCL 1120. Society and Health. 4 Hours.

Applies social scientific perspectives to the study of health, illness, and healthcare. Explores the ways that societal factors such as race, class, and gender interplay with health, healthcare, and health disparities. Studies neighborhoods and social networks in relation to health. Introduces basic sociological concepts relevant for the study of health and healthcare, such as social construction and medicalization. Offers students an opportunity to develop critical assessment skills while exploring a range of explanations for why, despite having the most expensive healthcare system, the United States ranks comparatively low in life expectancy and health and well-being outcomes. Uses lectures, case-based learning, and small-group workshops to explore the ways that our social environment shapes health in contemporary U.S. society. Coreq. SOCL 1121. Cross-listed with PHTH 1120.

SOCL 1121. Society and Health Recitation. 0 Hours.

Provides a small-group discussion format to cover material in the corequisite lecture course. Coreq. SOCL 1120. Cross-listed with PHTH 1121.

SOCL 1200. Sociology of Alcoholism. 4 Hours.

Focuses on social responses to alcohol use. Examines drinking cultures and drinking practices in the United States; processes by which people are labeled “alcoholics,” and the role of agencies of social control, such as the criminal justice system and the healthcare system, in labeling and rehabilitation.

SOCL 1215. Society and Culture in Russia. 4 Hours.

Focuses on contemporary Russian society. Emphasizes the current and recent social, economic, and political characteristics of Russia and the ways in which it has evolved in the post–Soviet period. Cross-listed with INTL 1215.

SOCL 1220. Sociology of Boston. 4 Hours.

Examines Boston from the perspectives of environmental development, neighborhood and intergroup relations, institutional services, and symbolic meanings. Explores current issues in the city through term projects. Requires field trips.

SOCL 1222. Special Topics in Sociology. 4 Hours.

Designed as a specialized themes course for students in sociology and/or anthropology. Takes advantage of unique opportunities—visiting guests, special thematic interests—that are not part of the regular curriculum.

SOCL 1225. Aging in Society. 4 Hours.

Focuses on aging and the consequences of population aging. The population of the United States, as in many developed societies, has registered rapid growth in its elderly population. Examines the impact of an aging population on the healthcare system, family structure, the retirement system, and the economy. The policy implications of these changes are discussed with consideration of how policies addressing the elderly may affect other groups in society.

SOCL 1228. Social Problems. 4 Hours.

Analyzes in both empirical and theoretical terms many of the social problems currently facing Americans. Among these are deepening inequality and poverty among working and middle-class Americans, particularly racial minorities, women, and youth; related problems of racism and sexism; growing unemployment; international ecological crisis; deterioration of the health system; crime; and war and militarism. Strategies and political options for solving these problems are considered.

SOCL 1232. American Society. 4 Hours.

Focuses on American society, culture, and major social institutions: economic, religious, governmental, familial, educational, welfare, and recreational. Examines social classes and stratification, mobility, and individualism.

SOCL 1235. Social Psychology. 4 Hours.

Taught from a sociological perspective, social psychology represents the study of the relationship between the individual and society. Focuses on the ways human behavior is tied to social and cultural contexts, and how individuals shape and are shaped by group interaction. Topics may include socialization and how people develop a “social sense of self”; cross-cultural differences in interactional styles; pressures to conform to roles and stereotypes; identity formation and change, attitudes, interpersonal attraction, and prejudice and discrimination.

SOCL 1240. Sociology of Prejudice and Violence. 4 Hours.

Examines factors in the development and maintenance of prejudice and discrimination. Discusses American race relations, anti-Semitism, sex roles, and stereotyping.

SOCL 1241. Sociology of Violence. 4 Hours.

Examines the notion of violence and its pervasive presence in the social institutions we create and maintain every day. Conducts sociological analysis of the issues we address, borrowing from other disciplines as they prove helpful. Sociology tells us that beliefs, values, and norms that characterize the United States legitimize the preference for violence, largely through the obvious venues of the mass media that glorify violence but also in the subtler structural arrangements collectively constructed and maintained in our everyday behaviors. Offers students an opportunity to understand how the structure of our society and its social institutions inhibit or facilitate violent behavior.

SOCL 1245. Sociology of Poverty. 4 Hours.

Analyzes American poverty in historical perspective, drawing on comparisons with other countries. Critically evaluates sociological research and theories relating to poverty. Considers causes and effects of poverty as well as societal responses to poverty and its consequences. Suitable for students in applied fields, such as nursing, criminal justice, education, allied health, premed, and prelaw.

SOCL 1246. Environment and Society. 4 Hours.

Examines the social, political, and economic forces behind the global environmental crisis. Topics include such issues as global warming and climate disruption, world resource availability and the global economic crisis, environmental justice and social inequities in the exposure to ecological hazards, science and technology, environmental degradation in the Third World, globalization and unfair trade, state power and the role of the polluter-industrial complex in the United States, the history of the environmental movement, and exemplary environmental policies and programs. This theoretically oriented course also involves practical experience in environmental problem solving.

SOCL 1247. Urban Social Problems. 4 Hours.

Focuses on the foundations of urban life in historical perspective. Analyzes relation of city life to environment, population, social organization, technology, and cultural values. Examines growth trends, urbanization, urban planning, and citizen action.

SOCL 1255. Sociology of the Family. 4 Hours.

Focuses on families historically and across cultures and classes. Considers changes in contemporary families in terms of gender, family composition; women’s labor force participation, divorce, cohabitation, and other transformations. Cross-listed with WMNS 1255.

SOCL 1256. Violence in the Family. 4 Hours.

Examines physical, emotional, and sexual violence in families. Covers definitions, prevalence, causes, prevention, and treatment of specific cases of domestic violence as well as social policy issues and problems of legal intervention. Cross-listed with WMNS 1256.

SOCL 1260. Gender in a Changing Society. 4 Hours.

Considers why and how gender is socially constructed in U.S. society and looks at different theories of gender. Explores gender as an institution as well as different (cultural) expressions of masculinities and femininities. Includes topics of gender in everyday life as well as gender as an organizing principle in the institutions of families, education, workplaces, sexualities, religion, the media, politics, and forms of gender violence. Cross-listed with WMNS 1260.

SOCL 1272. Social Roles in the Business World. 4 Hours.

Analyzes the social structure of corporate and business life in contemporary America. Presents and discusses case studies from major accounting and/or industrial firms. Examines the “career line” in the world of business and management, with a special focus on age/sex, racial/ethnic, and class/income barriers.

SOCL 1273. Sociology of Gender and Work. 4 Hours.

Explores how gender both shapes and is shaped by experiences in the labor market. Considers the extent to which work is “gendered” and the ways in which this influences the jobs that men and women perform, the rewards they receive for their efforts, and their experiences in the workplace and at home. Underscores the relationship between paid and unpaid work (especially household labor). Cross-listed with WMNS 1273.

SOCL 1275. Social Stratification. 4 Hours.

Explores the causes and consequences of the unequal distribution of prestige, power, and wealth in human societies. Topics may include theories of social stratification; varieties of human stratification systems; various dimensions of stratification (race gender, class); and the ideologies used to justify (and criticize) inequalities. While the features of multiple societies are considered, primary emphasis is on the development and contemporary structure of the American class system.

SOCL 1276. Sociology of Occupations and Professions. 4 Hours.

Focuses on the meanings of work; division of labor and specialization; analysis of occupational structure and patterns of recruitment, training, and career preferences; and the classic professions and new trends in professionalization.

SOCL 1280. The Twenty-First-Century Workplace. 4 Hours.

Analyzes dramatic changes occurring in the work lives of Americans and considers the future of American workers within the global economy. Explores emerging labor markets, gender, race, and technology in shaping contemporary American work settings.

SOCL 1283. Globalization and Social Change. 4 Hours.

Focuses on the economic, sociocultural, and political dimensions of globalization, emphasizing trends unfolding during the post–World War II era. Emphasizes the shifting organization of economic activity, the changing role of the nation-state, the emergence and spread of new cultural forms, and the linkage between global forces and urban and regional patterns of development. Additional topics include patterns and forms of social inequality, the relation between gender and globalization, the rise of transnational social movements, and the growth of global awareness.

SOCL 1285. Deviant Behavior and Social Control. 4 Hours.

Explores the conditions under which people categorize others as deviant; processes by which persons so defined are assigned deviant status and assume appropriate roles and self-images; development of deviant careers and their relation to deviant subcultures; and situations in which people transform deviant identity.

SOCL 1287. Sociology of Religion. 4 Hours.

Offers a comparative and analytic treatment of religion as a social institution, focusing on the relations between religious organizations and other social institutions, with particular emphasis on the American experience. Analyzes religion as an agent of social change and stability.

SOCL 1290. Juvenile Delinquency. 4 Hours.

Examines the sociological and psychological approaches to juvenile delinquency and their implications for a typology of delinquency. Discusses problems of prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation.

SOCL 1295. Drugs and Society. 4 Hours.

Focuses on historical and contemporary drug issues through the lens of classic sociological concerns. Rather than looking at only the legal/illegal discourse or historical/contemporary production, distribution, and use of drugs, the course frames drug topics around issues of class, race and ethnicity, age, and gender, asking the question of which drugs are used by whom and why at certain life stages. Specific topics include the high incarceration rates for nonviolent drug offenders; the role of drugs in death and dying via death penalty drugs and/or hospice care; mental health and drug treatment; and the potential perfidy of global drug testing and management.

SOCL 1297. Sociology of Popular Culture. 4 Hours.

Presents a sociological analysis of popular culture, focusing on the relationship between popular culture and social institutions such as religion, law, education, economy, and family; the organizations and artistic communities that produce popular culture such as the music industry, advertising, media, and television; and personal and political issues raised by popular culture.

SOCL 1298. Sociology of Hip-Hop: Politics, Identity, and Youth Culture in the Late Twentieth Century. 4 Hours.

Examines the global development of hip-hop and its manifestations in the realm of music, visual art, fashion, and language. Analyzes the antecedents of hip-hop and the development and emergence of this African-American expressive culture. Explores the social and political implications of hip-hop culture and the emergence of hip-hop in New York City in the 1970s through its evolution into a billion-dollar industry with wide global influence in marketing, film, music, and politics. Studies the dynamics of race, gender, youth, and class.

SOCL 1346. Environmental Activism and Movements: An Open Classroom. 4 Hours.

Offers an open-classroom experience focusing on the role of environmental activists and movements in addressing the global ecological crisis, emphasizing how to evaluate the organizing strategies, political tactics, organizational forms, and policy goals adopted by various environmental movement organizations (EMOs). Offers students an opportunity to understand the most effective means for bringing about meaningful social and environmental transformation. Includes numerous guest presentations from prominent environmental scholars, activists, filmmakers, and journalists, and includes guest panels and new film showings; these presentations are open to the larger Northeastern community.

SOCL 1990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

SOCL 2205. Law and Social Justice. 4 Hours.

Analyzes the impact of the legal system on the creation and perpetuation of criminality in contemporary American society. Devotes particular attention to the study of the creation of criminal law, the judicial process, and the role of law in the gap between crime and social justice. Suitable for students in prelaw, criminal justice, political science, and allied fields.

SOCL 2268. Social Movements. 4 Hours.

Introduces the social, cultural, and political dynamics that surround social movements, both historically and in the contemporary world. Emphasizes theory and research on national and transnational social movements, including studies of revolutions and political upheavals, demands for civil and human rights, movements for gender equality, and other instances of movements for social and political change. Emphasizes how structural factors shape social movement emergence and development and how social movements in turn shape the structure of societies.

SOCL 2270. Race and Ethnic Relations. 4 Hours.

Focuses on racial and religious groups, particularly with reference to the United States. Places special emphasis on historical development, specific problems of adjustment and assimilation, and present-day problems and trends.

SOCL 2300. Social Theory. 4 Hours.

Reviews the dominant theoretical traditions in classical and contemporary sociology, showing the links between the social thought of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and current social thought. Prereq. (a) SOCL 1101 and (b) two sociology courses numbered 1000 or above (c) ENGW 1111, ENGW 1102, ENGL 1111, or ENGL 1102. .

SOCL 2303. Gender and Reproductive Justice. 4 Hours.

Introduces the social, legal, and economic barriers to accessing reproductive healthcare domestically and internationally. Draws on various theoretical and analytic tools including critical race theory, critical legal theory, sociology of science, human rights, feminist theory, and a range of public health methods. Access to reproductive health services, including abortion, is one of the most contested political, social, cultural, and religious issues today. Covers domestic, regional, and international legal and regulatory frameworks on sexual reproductive health. Cross-listed with HIST 2303 and WMNS 2303. .

SOCL 2320. Statistical Analysis in Sociology. 4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to obtain knowledge and skills essential for understanding the theory and practice of social statistics commonly used in social research. Topics covered include the operationalization of abstract concepts; descriptive statistics; correlation; bivariate regression; central limit theorem; confidence intervals; hypothesis testing; and key concepts such as association, causation, and spurious relationships. Statistical software is used to complete assignments.

SOCL 2321. Research Methods in Sociology. 4 Hours.

Introduces students to the range of research methods used by sociologists. Covers experimental research, field research, survey research, and historical-comparative research. Sampling, the rules of evidence in empirical research, research ethics, and the place of values are discussed. Required for sociology majors. Prereq. SOCL 1101. .

SOCL 2323. Ethnographic Methods. 4 Hours.

Focuses on the practical, ethical, and theoretical issues underlying qualitative field research. Emphasizes firsthand experience with participation, observation, interviewing, note-taking, data analysis, and ethnographic writing. Open only to sociology and anthropology majors. Prereq. SOCL 1101. .

SOCL 2324. Human Services Research and Evaluation. 4 Hours.

Covers basic issues in applied research and the evaluation of services including the purposes of evaluation, ethics, formulating questions and measuring answers, designing evaluations and planning oriented research, utilizing evaluation results, and the turbulent setting of action programs. Suitable for students majoring in human services, sociology, psychology, nursing, health education, and related fields. Prereq. SOCL 1101 or HUSV 1101.

SOCL 2358. Current Issues in Cities and Suburbs. 4 Hours.

Introduces students to pressing urban issues: urban sprawl, poverty, education, transportation, economic development, and housing, through an intensive analysis of the Boston metropolitan area. The course is cotaught by university faculty and practitioners in government, community, and nonprofit organizations throughout the metropolitan area. Offers students the opportunity to analyze Boston data, go on outings to see development in progress, talk with urban practitioners about what they do, and conduct research on an urban issue of their choice.

SOCL 2359. Current Issues in Cities and Suburbs Abroad. 4 Hours.

Introduces students to pressing urban issues—urban sprawl, poverty, education, transportation, economic development, and housing—through an intensive analysis of the metropolitan area. Taught by university faculty and local practitioners in government, community, and nonprofit organizations. Offers students an opportunity to analyze urban data, to go on outings to see development in progress, and to talk with urban practitioners about what they do in urban contexts outside of the United States. To be taken as part of a Dialogue of Civilizations.

SOCL 2450. Class, Power, and Social Change. 4 Hours.

Focuses on theories of social inequality as applied to the exercise of power and large-scale social change. Examines contemporary events in order to understand power structures.

SOCL 2990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

SOCL 2991. Research Practicum. 2-4 Hours.

Involves students in collaborative research under the supervision of a faculty member. Offers students an opportunity to learn basic research methods in the discipline. Prereq. Sophomore standing or above and permission of instructor.

SOCL 3100. Gender, Social Justice, and Transnational Activism. 4 Hours.

Introduces issues, themes, and debates in feminist transnational theory, practice, and activism in contemporary contexts and how it has changed under the processes of globalization. Examines differences among women relating to race, class, sexuality, national identity, and political economy in reckoning with possibilities for sustainable social justice. Students interrogate the relationship between the local and global; the production of knowledge in different regions; the pragmatics of political mobilization; the varying contours of “social justice”; and other issues. Offers students an opportunity to discuss the impact of globalization, neoliberalism, and intimate violence on gendered politics and relations and to contend with the politics of difference, to debate its challenges, and to imagine possible futures for transnational gender justice. Cross-listed with POLS 3100 and WMNS 3100.

SOCL 3401. Social Policy and Intervention. 4 Hours.

Focuses on study of the formation of social policies in response to social problems. Analyzes policies and problems, supporters and opponents of policy change, conditions under which control agencies adopt new policies, and effects of policy change. Particular emphasis is on case studies of social action and legal change. Prereq. SOCL 1101, ANTH 1101, CRIM 1100, HUSV 1101, INTL 1101, POLS 1140, POLS 1160, or WMNS 1103.

SOCL 3402. Feminist Perspectives on Society. 4 Hours.

Examines social science and interdisciplinary feminist literature that focuses on women in families and at work, and that deals with physical issues including violence against women and abortion. Incorporates the perspectives of women of color. Considers and evaluates women’s views of social life as well as recognizes the differences among women. Prereq. SOCL 1101, ANTH 1101, CRIM 1100, HUSV 1101, INTL 1101, POLS 1140, POLS 1160, or WMNS 1103.

SOCL 3406. Class, Crime, and the Legal System. 4 Hours.

Presents major sociological theories of crime and of the functioning of the criminal justice system in the United States. Examines statistical data and research on crime and justice. Highlights influence of class, race, and gender in the production of crime and in outcomes of the justice system. Prereq. SOCL 1101, ANTH 1101, CRIM 1100, HUSV 1101, INTL 1101, POLS 1140, POLS 1160, or WMNS 1103.

SOCL 3407. The Immigrant Experience: Ethnicity, Race, and Inequality in America. 4 Hours.

Explores the integration of today’s immigrants into the housing and labor markets and political system by their ethnicity and race. Focuses on how immigrant children and the children of immigrants are incorporating into American society. Addresses several key questions, including: (1) How do white and nonwhite immigrants compare to native-born whites and nonwhites with respect to their residential attainment? (2) Do white and nonwhite immigrants negatively affect native-born white and nonwhite workers? (3) How politically active are white and nonwhite immigrants relative to their native-born counterparts? Students research how immigrants are incorporating into the Boston metropolitan area. Prereq. SOCL 1101, ANTH 1101, CRIM 1100, HUSV 1101, INTL 1101, POLS 1140, POLS 1160, or WMNS 1103.

SOCL 3408. Sociology of Organizations. 4 Hours.

Examines sociological perspectives on the structures and processes of large-scale formal organizations in Western society and contemporary organizational theory and research, with illustrations from business, governmental, and other organizations. Prereq. SOCL 1101, ANTH 1101, CRIM 1100, HUSV 1101, INTL 1101, POLS 1140, POLS 1160, or WMNS 1103.

SOCL 3411. The Networked Society Abroad. 4 Hours.

Introduces students to basic concepts and principles of social network analysis. Taught while abroad as part of a Dialogue of Civilizations program, it combines studying the different roles that social networks play in different institutions and societal settings with appropriate readings that offer a conceptual, theoretical, and applicable context for understanding the networked society.

SOCL 3414. The Sociology of Campus Life. 4 Hours.

Focuses on campus life through the lens of classic sociological concerns of race, class, and gender. Offers students an opportunity to address core contemporary issues in higher education; to develop an understanding of campus life from the perspective of learning that occurs both inside and outside the classroom; and to assess how that learning impacts their views of themselves and their larger context. Also offers students an opportunity to develop an understanding of student commitment to issues of social change and social justice. Prereq. SOCL 1101, ANTH 1101, CRIM 1100, HUSV 1101, INTL 1101, POLS 1140, POLS 1160, or WMNS 1103.

SOCL 3418. Greater Boston Urban Policy Seminar. 4 Hours.

Designed to introduce the advanced undergraduate sociology, political science, or economics student to the broad area of public policy related to the specific problems of large metropolitan areas. Throughout the seminar there will be a focus on greater Boston. Among the issues discussed are racial attitudes and residential segregation, the urban labor market, housing, urban sprawl and transportation, education, public health, and urban planning. Links between all of these issues are explored. Prereq. SOCL 1101, ANTH 1101, CRIM 1100, HUSV 1101, INTL 1101, POLS 1140, POLS 1160, or WMNS 1103.

SOCL 3437. Children and Youth in Contemporary Society. 4 Hours.

Presents a sociological discussion of children focusing on race, gender, class, and childhood age as factors that children respond to as they go through their daily lives. Issues such as peer-group relations and special problems unique to childhood and their policy implications are also explored. Topics may include foster care, juvenile justice, youth pregnancy, and child labor among other issues. Prereq. SOCL 1101, ANTH 1101, CRIM 1100, HUSV 1101, INTL 1101, POLS 1140, POLS 1160, or WMNS 1103.

SOCL 3440. Sociology of Human Service Organizations. 4 Hours.

Introduces selected theoretical perspectives on human service organizations, emphasizing defining organizational goals and effectiveness. Gives students the opportunity to become familiar with the nature of human service organizations, to compare these organizations to business and industrial organizations, to outline specific problems that human service organizations face, and to propose potential solutions. Prereq. SOCL 1101, ANTH 1101, CRIM 1100, HUSV 1101, INTL 1101, POLS 1140, POLS 1160, or WMNS 1103.

SOCL 3441. Sociology of Health and Illness. 4 Hours.

Offers a substantial overview of the sociology of health and illness. Medical sociology is an important subfield of sociology with important links to public health, social psychology, psychology, and other medical fields. Emphasizes several critical areas: society and disease; theoretical understandings of health inequalities; medicalization and social control; healthcare professions and professionalization; and the American healthcare system. Offers students an opportunity to obtain analytical frameworks to explore other topics in medical sociology not covered in this course.

SOCL 3451. Privilege. 4 Hours.

Examines contemporary social inequality in the United States. Focuses on “how the elite obtain and maintain privilege and why.” Examines privilege as a system of advantages based on specific social characteristics (class, race, gender, and sexuality) and studies how privilege works in a variety of social institutions (e.g., family, housing, health, and crime). Students are charged to critically analyze stratification from a perspective of privilege rather than disadvantage and to consider how privilege shapes institutions and inequalities in U.S. society and their own lives. Prereq. (a) SOCL 1101, ANTH 1101, CRIM 1100, HUSV 1101, INTL 1101, POLS 1140, POLS 1160, or WMNS 1103 and (b) ENGW 1111, ENGW 1102, ENGL 1111, or ENGL 1102.

SOCL 3455. Seminar in Urban Sociology. 4 Hours.

Focuses on important topics in the study of urban areas within sociology. Themes include residential segregation, suburbanization, neighborhood development and change, the economic development of cities, fiscal crisis, gentrification, urban crime, and public and private urban policies. Prereq. SOCL 1101, ANTH 1101, CRIM 1100, HUSV 1101, INTL 1101, POLS 1140, POLS 1160, or WMNS 1103.

SOCL 3460. Sociology of Latino Society. 4 Hours.

Designed to familiarize students with the Latino population in the United States. Reviews economic, political, and social factors that have contributed to the presence of Latinos in the United States. Sociological perspectives are used to understand the social, economic, and political characteristics of the various Latino groups and how these relate to larger social and economic processes in the U.S. society. Prereq. SOCL 1101, ANTH 1101, CRIM 1100, HUSV 1101, INTL 1101, POLS 1140, POLS 1160, or WMNS 1103.

SOCL 3465. Globalization and the Evolution of Human Societies. 4 Hours.

Examines current issues of globalization from a sociological viewpoint, emphasizing the forces that create ties between societies and the consequences of these ties. Analyzes the structures of human societies, the ways in which they change over long periods of time, and the consequences of changes for people’s actions and beliefs. Stresses the importance of social “environments” in understanding social change and of the process of social adaptation. Uses sociological concepts to analyze current issues of globalization, their origins, and ways of dealing with them. Prereq. SOCL 1101, ANTH 1101, CRIM 1100, HUSV 1101, INTL 1101, POLS 1140, POLS 1160, or WMNS 1103.

SOCL 3470. Social Conflict and Community Service. 4 Hours.

Offers a community service course supported by a grant from a Northeastern alumnus. The primary objective is to assist students in learning about the causes, consequences, and possible solutions for social conflict in the Boston area. Attention is also given to helping students see beyond their customary social experiences. Students work in teams on projects that deal in some way with social conflict, broadly defined. Reflections occur through team interactions, journal summaries, and focused discussions in weekly seminars. Each student writes an analytic paper that ties in sociological issues; some teams produce sets of papers that combine to produce reports for their host organizations. Prereq. SOCL 1101, ANTH 1101, CRIM 1100, HUSV 1101, INTL 1101, POLS 1140, POLS 1160, or WMNS 1103.

SOCL 3471. Social Conflict and Community Services Abroad. 4 Hours.

Designed to assist students in learning about the causes, consequences, and possible solutions for social conflict by studying conflict abroad. Uses readings from sociology, political science, gender studies, education, and history about the nature of conflict and conflict resolution. Also designed to help students see beyond their customary social experiences and academic disciplines. Offers students an opportunity to work alone or in teams on projects that deal with social conflict, broadly defined. Requires community service in a specific organization in the country of stay. Uses team interactions, journal summaries, and focused class discussions to offer in-depth reflection on students’ project work, team-based experiences, readings, and related social issues. Requires each student to write an analytic paper tying theoretical issues with their research experiences. Prereq. SOCL 1101, ANTH 1101, CRIM 1100, HUSV 1101, INTL 1101, POLS 1140, POLS 1160, or WMNS 1103.

SOCL 3480. Comparative Political Economy. 4 Hours.

Designed to introduce the undergraduate student to competing paradigms in economic thought and public policy. The first third of the course is devoted to a brief overview of the historical, philosophical, and psychological roots of political economic ideology and socioeconomic institutions. The last two-thirds is spent in an inquiry into conservative, liberal, and radical political economic perspectives. Focuses on the role of government in political and economic affairs. Throughout the entire course, special attention is paid to an analysis of current economic conditions and policy in light of the theoretical models explored in class. Prereq. SOCL 1101, ANTH 1101, CRIM 1100, HUSV 1101, INTL 1101, POLS 1140, POLS 1160, or WMNS 1103.

SOCL 3485. Environment, Technology, and Society. 4 Hours.

Focuses on the connections between the development of modern nation-states and the control of nature. Explores the role human societies play in such events as climate change, tsunamis, and droughts. Asks how industrialization and the process of science and technology development are related to our transforming environmental conditions, as well as how the social sciences, the sciences, and engineering are transforming to address these issues. Draws on social theory, environmental history, anthropology/sociology, art/design, and open-source technologies to investigate theoretically and methodologically the sources, experiences of, and solutions for environmental health questions.

SOCL 3487. Applied Sociology: Practice and Theory. 4 Hours.

Offers the academic component of the experiential education requirement for sociology majors; to be taken after students have completed the experiential component. Provides a seminar format in which students will reflect upon their approved experience (that is, co-op, internship, community service, and so on) and integrate it into a research project. Students who have completed study abroad or a service-learning course in the department may not have to take this course. Prereq. SOCL 1101, ANTH 1101, CRIM 1100, HUSV 1101, INTL 1101, POLS 1140, POLS 1160, or WMNS 1103.

SOCL 3488. Doing Sociology in the City Abroad. 4 Hours.

Introduces students to the classic sociological method of urban ethnography by facilitating their independent ethnographic research while abroad. Designed to be taken as part of a Dialogue of Civilizations program. Students spend the term in a geographic location, or with a social group of their choosing, conducting participant observation and taking field notes in the Chicago School tradition. Supplements the experience of conducting fieldwork with readings and group reflection. Offers students an opportunity to engage with basic concepts of ethnography and the practices of conducting qualitative research, coding, interpretive analysis of data, and oral and written presentation of findings.

SOCL 3990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

SOCL 4513. Political Sociology. 4 Hours.

Uses conceptual frames, theoretical perspectives, and case studies to explore the interplay between everyday life and macro-institutional dynamics of political power. Analyzes political contestation and negotiation via religious, spatial, gendered, national, and international aspects of power. Prereq. (a) Sophomore standing or above and (b) SOCL 1101, ANTH 1101, CRIM 1100, HUSV 1101, INTL 1101, POLS 1140, POLS 1160, or WMNS 1103.

SOCL 4514. “The Wire” and the Study of Urban Inequalities. 4 Hours.

Offers a seminar examining a range of topics related to the issue of urban inequality. Uses the HBO series The Wire (which aired from 2002–2008) as a vehicle to explore how crime and social control, labor markets, housing policies, local politics, and other urban institutions both reflect and contribute to systemic inequality in U.S. cities. The material for this class consists of academic readings and seasons one through three of The Wire. Prereq. (a) Sophomore standing or above and (b) SOCL 1101, ANTH 1101, CRIM 1100, HUSV 1101, INTL 1101, POLS 1140, POLS 1160, or WMNS 1103.

SOCL 4515. Public Policy Seminar. 4 Hours.

Designed to introduce the advanced undergraduate sociology, political science, or economics student to the art and science of public policy development, analysis, and evaluation. The first half of the course is devoted to a consideration of the social, political, and economic roots of public policy. The second half includes an inquiry into a range of issues having to do with the “art and science” of policymaking. A number of case studies are reviewed to provide examples of policy in action. Prereq. (a) Sophomore standing or above and (b) SOCL 1101, ANTH 1101, CRIM 1100, HUSV 1101, INTL 1101, POLS 1140, POLS 1160, or WMNS 1103.

SOCL 4518. Law and Social Issues. 4 Hours.

Explores the ways in which the legal system shapes and is, in turn, shaped by ideological and political movements. For example, the bitter controversy over whether runaway juries have created “jackpot justice” by awarding huge sums to plaintiffs is a reflection of deep cultural and political divides over individual rights and corporate power. Also examines new legal principles that are currently evolving to deal with such misdeeds as systematic corporate misconduct, cyber crimes, and harassment. Prereq. (a) Sophomore standing or above and (b) SOCL 1101, ANTH 1101, CRIM 1100, HUSV 1101, INTL 1101, POLS 1140, POLS 1160, or WMNS 1103.

SOCL 4519. Seminar in Social Psychology. 4 Hours.

Explores in depth the ways sociologists study the interaction between individuals and social context. Prereq. (a) Sophomore standing or above and (b) SOCL 1101, ANTH 1101, CRIM 1100, HUSV 1101, INTL 1101, POLS 1140, POLS 1160, or WMNS 1103.

SOCL 4520. Race, Class, and Gender. 4 Hours.

Considers the intersection of race, class, and gender in social structure, institutions, and people’s lives. Utilizes an interdisciplinary approach to focus on the socially constructed nature of these concepts and how they shape and create meaning in individual lives. Difference with an emphasis on inequality and varying life chances is a central concept for understanding our society and is central to our work. Requires a significant amount of reading and the class is run like a seminar with students expected to participate, take responsibility, and write a paper. Prereq. (a) Sophomore standing or above and (b) SOCL 1101, ANTH 1101, CRIM 1100, HUSV 1101, INTL 1101, POLS 1140, POLS 1160, or WMNS 1103 and (c) ENGW 1111, ENGW 1102, ENGL 1111, or ENGL 1102. Cross-listed with WMNS 4520.

SOCL 4521. Ethnic, Racial, and Religious Identity. 4 Hours.

Explores some of the sociological assumptions about identity, identity politics, and the processes of assimilation and acculturation. Investigates the theories and methods used in the study of Jewish identity politics as a way of understanding a postmodern critique of the identity literature. Ends with a feminist critique of multiculturalism as a way of bringing together the academic study of identity, be it racial, ethnic, or religious, and political decision making. Prereq. (a) Sophomore standing or above and (b) SOCL 1101, ANTH 1101, CRIM 1100, HUSV 1101, INTL 1101, POLS 1140, POLS 1160, or WMNS 1103.

SOCL 4522. Political Ecology and Environmental Justice. 4 Hours.

Engages advanced sociological research on topics relating to political ecology and environmental justice, with the goal of producing a publishable report(s)to be published and posted on the Northeastern Environmental Justice Research (NEJRC) website and circulated on various national environmental list-serves. Possible topics of investigation could include the power of the polluter-industrial complex in the American political system; the role of trade agreements in relation to the globalization and the export of environmental hazards; climate justice, with an analysis of the manner in which climate change is exacerbating social and environmental injustices, especially for the poorest and most politically powerless populations in the world system; or many other important issues. Prereq. (a) Sophomore standing or above and (b) SOCL 1101, ANTH 1101, CRIM 1100, HUSV 1101, INTL 1101, POLS 1140, POLS 1160, or WMNS 1103 and (c) ENGW 1111, ENGW 1102, ENGL 1111, or ENGL 1102.

SOCL 4523. Sexualities. 4 Hours.

Offers a primarily sociological overview of the field of sexuality studies. Explores the ways in which sexual behaviors and identities are in fact shaped by social norms, values, and expectations; the meanings and statuses ascribed to sexual acts, behaviors, identities, and communities; and the interactive processes by which sexualities are achieved. Also brings an intersectional framework to discussions by emphasizing how our understandings of sexuality interact with categories of gender, race, nation, and class. Examines a variety of topics, such as transgenderism, power, extreme and illicit sex, socialization, pornography, and politics. Prereq. (a) Sophomore standing or above and (b) SOCL 1101, ANTH 1101, CRIM 1100, HUSV 1101, INTL 1101, POLS 1140, POLS 1160, or WMNS 1103 and (c) ENGW 1111, ENGW 1102, ENGL 1111, or ENGL 1102. Cross-listed with WMNS 4523.

SOCL 4525. American Demographics. 4 Hours.

Offers an applied research experience in which students have the opportunity to study the major areas of demography. Focuses on the resources of the United States Census Bureau and, in particular, the data products available from recent census surveys. Prereq. (a) Sophomore standing or above and (b) SOCL 1101, ANTH 1101, CRIM 1100, HUSV 1101, INTL 1101, POLS 1140, POLS 1160, or WMNS 1103.

SOCL 4528. Computers and Society. 4 Hours.

Focuses on the social and political context of technological change and development. Through readings, course assignments, and class discussions, students have an opportunity to learn to analyze the ways that the Internet, artificial intelligence, and other technological advances have required a reworking of every human institution—both to facilitate the development of these technologies and in response to their adoption. Prereq. Sophomore standing or above.

SOCL 4530. Seminar in the Family. 4 Hours.

Explores issues facing contemporary families including combining work and family, single motherhood, fathers and children, family violence, and differences among families of different ethnicities, cultures, and classes. Prereq. (a) Sophomore standing or above and (b) SOCL 1101, ANTH 1101, CRIM 1100, HUSV 1101, INTL 1101, POLS 1140, POLS 1160, or WMNS 1103.

SOCL 4535. European Union: Social and Political. 4 Hours.

Designed to provide a sociological introduction to the history and development of the common market, institutions, and policies of the European Union (EU). The EU began in the 1950s as a series of agreements on economic issues among a small number of countries, and has evolved to take on a role in various social, economic, and cultural areas in its member states. Emphasizes current challenges, issues, and debates in the EU, for example, the introduction of the euro; common policy areas including gender and racial equality; social policies and labor markets; migration and enlargement; the EU as an emerging international actor; and transatlantic relations. Prereq. (a) Sophomore standing or above and (b) SOCL 1101, ANTH 1101, CRIM 1100, HUSV 1101, INTL 1101, POLS 1140, POLS 1160, or WMNS 1103 and (c) ENGW 1111, ENGW 1102, ENGL 1111, or ENGL 1102.

SOCL 4580. Special Topics in Sociology. 4 Hours.

Designed as a specialized themes course for students with experience in sociology and/or anthropology. Takes advantage of unique opportunities—visiting guests, special thematic interests—which are not part of the regular curriculum.

SOCL 4600. Senior Seminar. 4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to integrate and apply knowledge of the discipline by building on completed course work and conducting original research on a topic of their choice. Requires students to produce a research paper due at the end of the semester. This seminar operates as an intellectual workshop in which students share the process, as well as the results, of their research with the group. The class comes together to inform, guide, critique, and support one another’s research efforts in a collaborative fashion. Students are expected to make constructive comments on the work of others and to freely exchange ideas. Prereq. Junior or senior standing; sociology majors and sociology combined majors only.

SOCL 4970. Junior/Senior Honors Project 1. 4 Hours.

Focuses on in-depth project in which a student conducts research or produces a product related to the student’s major field. Combined with Junior/Senior Project 2 or college-defined equivalent for 8-credit honors project. Prereq. Junior or senior standing; sociology majors and sociology combined majors only.

SOCL 4971. Junior/Senior Honors Project 2. 4 Hours.

Focuses on second semester of in-depth project in which a student conducts research or produces a product related to the student’s major field. Prereq. SOCL 4970 and junior or senior standing; sociology majors and sociology combined majors only.

SOCL 4990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

SOCL 4991. Research. 4 Hours.

Offers an opportunity to conduct research under faculty supervision.

SOCL 4992. Directed Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers independent work under the direction of members of the department on a chosen topic. Course content depends on instructor.

SOCL 4993. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers independent work under the direction of members of the department on a chosen topic. Course content depends on instructor.

SOCL 4994. Internship. 4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity for internship work.

SOCL 4996. Experiential Education Directed Study. 4 Hours.

Draws upon the student’s approved experiential activity and integrates it with study in the academic major. Restricted to those students who are using it to fulfill their experiential education requirement.

SOCL 5976. Directed Study. 1-4 Hours.

Comprises reading and research directed by a faculty member. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

SOCL 5978. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers independent work under the direction of members of the department on a chosen topic. Course content depends on instructor. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

SOCL 5984. Research. 1-4 Hours.

Offers an opportunity to conduct research under faculty supervision. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.