Sociology

Website

Matthew Hunt, PhD
Professor and Chair

Linda M. Blum, PhD
Associate Professor and Graduate Program Director

960 Renaissance Park
617.373.2686
617.373.2688 (fax)
gradsoc@northeastern.edu

Graduate Programs Contact
Joan Collins, Graduate Program Administrator, j.collins@northeastern.edu

Graduate Programs Booklet
 

Uncertainty about the economy, health care, and the labor market. Ethnic conflicts in an era of rapid globalization. Concern for the environment. Shifting gender arrangements as work and family come into conflict. Violence in school and even in houses of worship.

Never has there been a greater need for sociological research focused on the problems and issues of our time.

The Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Northeastern University offers MA and PhD degrees in sociology within a flexible program attractive to students interested in both academic and nonacademic careers. The MA program has two tracks—one academic and one applied (in which the student substitutes an additional research methods course for one of the required courses in social theory). Students pursuing the PhD degree earn the MA degree (academic version) en route to completing the doctorate, unless they earned the MA in sociology elsewhere. The program seeks to provide students with the theoretical foundation and research skills needed to engage in a career in teaching and research, in the public sector, or in industry. Thirty-two faculty members bring a wide range of substantive interests, organized around four specialization areas: the sociology of gender; globalization; environment and health; and urban sociology. Apart from these formal areas of concentration, the department has extraordinary strengths in inequality and social movements.

Our faculty have won numerous prizes for excellence in the classroom, and many have also played leadership roles in establishing prestigious centers and interdisciplinary programs on Northeastern’s campus.

The Department of Sociology and Anthropology is a founding unit of Northeastern’s School of Public Policy and Urban Affairs, which is dedicated to providing advanced research opportunities in a multidisciplinary environment. The department also maintains strong ties with the Brudnick Center for the Study of Conflict and Violence; the Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies program; the Kitty and Michael Dukakis Center for Urban and Regional Policy; the Northeastern Environmental Justice Research Collaborative; the Social Science Environmental Health Research Institute; and the Law and Public Policy program.

Doctor of Philosophy

Master of Arts (MA)

Sociology Courses

SOCL 5976. Directed Study. 1-4 Hours.

Comprises reading and research directed by a faculty member. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

SOCL 5978. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers independent work under the direction of members of the department on a chosen topic. Course content depends on instructor. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

SOCL 5984. Research. 1-4 Hours.

Offers an opportunity to conduct research under faculty supervision. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

SOCL 6960. Exam Preparation—Master’s. 0 Hours.

Offers the student the opportunity to prepare for the master’s qualifying exam under faculty supervision.

SOCL 6962. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

SOCL 6966. Practicum. 1-4 Hours.

Provides eligible students with an opportunity for practical experience.

SOCL 7000. Qualifying Exam. 0 Hours.

Provides eligible students with an opportunity to take the master’s qualifying exam.

SOCL 7100. Queer Theory: Sexualities, Genders, Politics. 3 Hours.

Introduces the core texts and key debates that have shaped queer theory and examines the intersections between queer theory and feminism and critical race theory. Seeks to provide an understanding of expansive and radical contemporary queer politics by analyzing foundational queer and feminist texts, pushing beyond narrow constructions of identity politics, anti-discrimination policy, and rights-based reforms. Engages queer theory by means of a rich philosophical and political interrogation of the meaning and content of “queer.” Cross-listed with WMNS 7100.

SOCL 7200. Foundations of Social Theory 1. 3 Hours.

Studies the classic theorists including Durkheim, Weber, Marx, and others.

SOCL 7201. Foundations of Social Theory 2. 3 Hours.

Reviews the dominant theoretical traditions in contemporary sociology, examining the key assumptions, terminology, weaknesses, and strengths of the pluralist, managerialist, neo-Marxist, feminist, and postmodern paradigms. Strives not only to expose students to the giants in the field but, more important, to give students the intellectual tools to situate entire theoretical traditions vis-à-vis one another. Introduces students to various schools of thought. Offers students the opportunity to learn “how to think” sociologically and theoretically—that is, to go beyond simplistic and descriptive accounts of social phenomena to offer more systematic and insightful explanations. Prereq. Sociology students only.

SOCL 7202. Feminist Theory. 3 Hours.

Considers major developments in feminist theory since the rise of the contemporary women’s movement. First looks at early socialist feminist and radical feminist theory and critiques of them, psychoanalytical feminist theory, postmodern feminism and its critics, and theories about exclusion and difference among women, particularly by women of color. Gender, sexuality, and power are central categories of analysis.

SOCL 7203. Contemporary Sociological Theory. 3 Hours.

Analyzes major contemporary theories, focusing on such themes as the relationship of criticism to theory, the dynamics of exchange and production in postnational economies, the socialization of “rational choice,” the theoretical significance of postmodernity and difference, the relation of the historical to the social dimension of social organization, the interaction of power and discourse, the operations of gender within theory, and the significance of class, race, and gender to models of the global political economy.

SOCL 7204. Ethnographic Theory. 3 Hours.

Examines ethnography, an approach mostly utilized in a “field setting” outside the university and its library. Calls for researchers to become directly involved or immersed in the everyday lives of individuals and/or groups in order to examine and explain the ways they subjectively perceive, feel, and give meaning to their world. The course’s main objective is to teach you the practicalities, realities, joys, and limitations of ethnography through the examination of some writings on ethnographies and a couple of actual ethnographies.

SOCL 7205. Law, Conflict, and Violence. 3 Hours.

Contrasts several major schools of thought about the relationships between law, conflict, and violence. Examines the differing assumptions about the law in legal realism, social choice theory, law and economics, Marxism, critical legal studies, functionalism, conflict theory, and natural law in order to reveal their explanations of crime and violence and the policies that arise from their theoretical assumptions.

SOCL 7206. Theories of Political Economy. 3 Hours.

Explores the basic philosophical, psychological, political, and economic underpinnings of contemporary public policy, with an emphasis on the United States. Considers the core philosophical and political theories of conservative, liberal, and radical political economy and examines the economic structures consistent with these competing theories.

SOCL 7210. Statistical Methods of Sociology. 3 Hours.

Introduces statistical methods relevant to sociology. Topics include tabular analysis, nonparametric statistics, analysis of variance, regression analysis, path analysis, measures of association, estimation, and univariate and multivariate hypothesis testing. A knowledge of elementary statistical theory is presumed.

SOCL 7211. Research Methods. 3 Hours.

Surveys methods of social research including field study and participant observation techniques, survey techniques, interviewing and questionnaire construction, sampling procedures, experimental design, content analysis, and use of available data. Examines the roots and consequences of violent behavior in society and the individual. Topics vary, but will include serial murder, massacres, hate crimes, workplace murder, group violence including cults, and mass media portrayals of violence. Prereq. Sociology students only.

SOCL 7212. Feminist Methodologies. 3 Hours.

Examines how feminist scholarship has challenged and reworked basic assumptions about the social world and the research that describes it. That requires three basic approaches: rethinking, reflecting, and rewriting. Examines the ways of knowing common to the social sciences and the ways in which new paradigms have or have not been integrated into the canons. Students are expected to do a close reading of the texts assigned and come prepared with questions and notes for the class meetings. Also requires one class presentation and one paper.

SOCL 7213. Advanced Research Methods. 3 Hours.

Presents quantitative techniques of analysis. Students are expected to conduct individual research projects. Prereq. SOCL 7211.

SOCL 7215. Advanced Quantitative Techniques. 3 Hours.

Covers multivariate statistical models and their applications to social science data. Covers the ordinary least squares (OLS) regression model and the assumptions underlying it in detail, as well as techniques for analyzing data when OLS assumptions do not apply, such as simultaneous equation models, time series models, and maximum likelihood techniques for limited and discrete dependent variables. This is a second-semester course in quantitative techniques for graduate students in the social sciences. Prereq. SOCL 7210 or POLS 7202.

SOCL 7219. Sociology of Mental Health and Illness. 3 Hours.

Provides an introduction to mental health and mental illness. Presents a number of perspectives on mental health and illness, including biological, genetic, and psychological approaches; however, the course focuses on the role of social factors in mental health and mental healthcare by examining the role of social factors in the etiology, course, and treatment of mental illness. Students have an opportunity to learn about the social consequences of mental illness, such as stigma, and explore ways to prevent these consequences. In addition, prevention, rehabilitation, and recovery are discussed. The social and political contexts within which mental health and mental illness occur are discussed as well as the role of professionals. This course is taught with attention to an interdisciplinary perspective.

SOCL 7220. Seminar in Qualitative Analysis. 3 Hours.

Studies qualitative techniques of analysis. Examines social-structure process and meaning in interacting groups. Students study a face-to-face group by means of participant observation using symbolic interaction concepts.

SOCL 7221. Globalization, Development, and Social Justice. 3 Hours.

Explores the rise of neoliberal globalization and its impact on local and national communities around the world. Examines complex patterns of resistance, including place-based struggles and transnational social movements. Combines theoretical analysis of global capitalism, development, the politics of resistance, and reformist/radical alternatives with the study of concrete struggles in defense of land, labor and human rights, indigenous cultures and identities, and ecological sustainability.

SOCL 7222. Gender and Globalization. 3 Hours.

Explores current issues and debates relating to the gendered effects of globalization and neoliberal reforms and the entanglement of their economic, social, and cultural effects. Gender research on globalization has expanded notions of work and migration to include the politics of location as well as the feminization of labor in transnational production. This seminar focuses on new forms of subjectivities, ideologies, sovereignty, and notions of citizenship in postindustrial and postcolonial settings. Topics may include, but are not limited to, poststructuralist feminist critiques, financial markets, migration, care and factory work, as well as the privatization of urban space.

SOCL 7225. Gender and Social Movements. 3 Hours.

Offers an in-depth examination of the sociological literature on the gender dynamics of social movements, both nationally based and transnational. Covers key questions, conceptual tools, and methodological frameworks in the study of social movements; the interplay of gender, the state, and social movements, including feminist and women’s movements; how social institutions and social norms may affect the course and outcomes of movements; and globalization, transnational social movements, and gender. Geared toward students who plan to do research on social movements or global social movements but also designed to be useful to those with interests in related fields.

SOCL 7227. Race and Ethnic Relations. 3 Hours.

Offers a graduate-level seminar in the sociology of race and ethnic relations. Explores the key social, economic, political, and ideological forces shaping race and ethnic relations in the United States, past and present, and the main theoretical, methodological, and substantive debates in the “race and ethnicity” subfield of sociology. Course topics include, but are not limited to, the conceptual and intellectual foundations of the study of race and ethnic relations; the sources and consequences of ethnic and racial identities; urban poverty and dynamics of racial residential segregation; the role of wealth in creating and perpetuating racial inequality; the “new black middle class”; and contemporary debates regarding racial prejudice, discrimination, and redistributive public policies in the United States.

SOCL 7230. Political Ecology of Global Capitalism. 3 Hours.

Analyzes the political economy of international capitalism, really existing state socialism, and the global environment. Includes philosophies of nature; laws of capital accumulation and ecological degradation; technology and the division of labor; combined and uneven development, imperialism, and ecological crises in the Third World; the relationship between economic and ecological crises; environmental policy, democracy, and the state; ecological racism, sexism, and classism; and the crisis of social movements in the United States.

SOCL 7231. Sociology of Prejudice and Violence. 3 Hours.

Examines the roots and consequences of violent behavior in society and the individual. Topics vary from semester to semester, but will include serial murder, massacres, hate crimes, workplace murder, group violence including cults, and mass media portrayals of violence.

SOCL 7232. Political Economy of Global Capitalism. 3 Hours.

Constitutes the required core course in the political economy concentration and serves as a theoretical introduction to neo-Marxian political economy. Includes historical materialism; the labor theory of value and elementary laws of capital accumulation; class, gender, race, and the division of labor; imperialism and underdevelopment; the state; political, economic, and social crisis theory; and debates concerning the restructuring of global capitalism.

SOCL 7233. American Demographics. 3 Hours.

Overviews major areas of demography including migration, fertility, population growth, and household transitions. Studies these processes in the context of social and economic changes, with an emphasis on societal consequences and social and economic policy.

SOCL 7234. Issues in Social Psychology. 3 Hours.

Examines human behavior from a sociological and psychological perspective. Gives special consideration to such topics as gossip and rumor, presentation of self, prejudice, and mass communication.

SOCL 7235. Urban Sociology. 3 Hours.

Discusses theories of the development of urban life. Compares preindustrial and industrialized urban areas. Presents methods for the study of urban social structure and change, and evaluates contemporary metropolitan action programs.

SOCL 7236. The Family. 3 Hours.

Analyzes social structure and social functions of the family as a social institution. Includes comparative and historical examination of relations between the family, gender, and other institutions in society.

SOCL 7237. Women, Men, and Social Change. 3 Hours.

Looks at how the Industrial Revolution and the corresponding changes in the labor force and patterns of domestic life have altered the sexual division of labor. In postindustrial society, new institutional forms are recasting personal relations. Examines these forces of social change and their impact on gender roles.

SOCL 7238. Sociology of Education. 3 Hours.

Analyzes the structure and function of educational institutions, and presents student, faculty, and administrative perspectives. Emphasizes the role of education in the process of socialization, social mobility, social change, and social control.

SOCL 7239. Sociology of Occupations and Professions. 3 Hours.

Studies the relations between the occupations and professions and society. Topics may include occupational stratification, professional group behavior, recruitment and socialization of occupations and professions, and political activism.

SOCL 7240. Sociology of Deviant Behavior. 3 Hours.

Analyzes theories of deviance (anomie, differential association, control, conflict, and labeling). Examines their basic assumptions, focus, key concepts, general propositions, empirical support, strengths and weaknesses, and implications for social policy.

SOCL 7241. Sociology of Law. 3 Hours.

Discusses the relationship among law, ethics, and social policy, with emphasis on such issues as family violence, the management of AIDS, state regulation of public morality, and health maintenance and the provision of medical care. The course has an applied focus and emphasizes student participation and initiatives.

SOCL 7242. Family Violence. 3 Hours.

Discusses physical abuse and sexual abuse of children, spousal violence and elder abuse, with emphasis on social policy and legal intervention.

SOCL 7243. Sociology of Health and Illness. 3 Hours.

Studies social aspects of illness and medicine, historically and cross-culturally. Focuses on illness and the medical profession in modern society and their structural settings: the community, the hospital, the medical school. Critically examines research studies in the field and specifies problems for future research.

SOCL 7244. Processes of Aging. 3 Hours.

Considers socioeconomic and social psychological consequences of aging from the perspective of healthcare providers. A major part of the course focuses directly on the biological changes entailed in aging and the appropriate medical management of geriatric patients. Open to students expected to provide healthcare services to geriatric patients.

SOCL 7245. Formal Organizations: Administration and Structure. 3 Hours.

Introduces and critically examines different theoretical approaches in an attempt to understand and explain how organizations work. Also examines the implications of organizational goals, structure, and control on society as a whole and organizational members in particular.

SOCL 7246. Sociology of Poverty. 3 Hours.

Analyzes sociological perspectives on causes of poverty, public views on poverty, and institutional responses to poverty. Emphasizes a concern with policy issues and implementation of policies. For advanced students in the social sciences and in the various human services schools in the University.

SOCL 7247. Economic Sociology. 3 Hours.

Reviews recent writings in economic sociology. Economic sociologists see social activity as embedded in social networks, institutional structures, history, and culture, while classical economics tends to view economic actors as behaving rationally in relative social isolation. This scholarship traces its intellectual roots to Marx, Weber, Durkheim, Simmel, Schumpeter, and Polanyi, while mainstream economists employ the lessons of Adam Smith, Ricardo, Mill, Marshall, Keynes, and Samuelson.

SOCL 7248. Race, Gender, Class: Feminist View. 3 Hours.

Analyzes the intersection of race, class, and gender in women’s lives and their meaning for equality and feminism. Includes work by and about men. An interdisciplinary approach focuses on the socially constructed nature of these concepts, how they shape social life, and create meaning. Difference has become a central category for understanding our multicultural social life, underscoring inequality, stratification, and divergent life chances and experiences in the United States. Examines struggles to analyze gender, race, ethnicity, and class simultaneously and to grapple with issues including theory, autobiography, sociological data and analysis, and popular culture.

SOCL 7249. Seminar in Cultural Studies. 3 Hours.

Focuses on issues having to do with the problematic connection between the social practices of representation (the relation of writing to idea) and practices of appropriation (the relation of knowing to reading). Discusses these two practices, at the heart of theoretical debates about the subject matter of cultural studies, in the context of recent critical formulations of praxis, power, social formation, and self-reflection. The overall project of the seminar is to investigate the historiographical and sociological aspects of interdisciplinary convergences among the humanities and social sciences.

SOCL 7250. Seminar in Urban Social Policies. 3 Hours.

Offers an overview of the contemporary urban policy issues in the United States. Examines the relationship between economic and political forces and how these forces determine which urban social issues get priority over the others. Uses case studies of specific urban social policies that were implemented in different cities, and discusses the possibilities for their nationwide implementation.

SOCL 7251. Community Analysis. 3 Hours.

Explores various approaches to the study of community, with emphasis on the politics of development and on neighborhoods. Also examines the importance of race, class, and ethnicity on emergence of new local social movements. Students are expected to do their own research project on specific community issues.

SOCL 7252. Class Structure and Social Inequality. 3 Hours.

Places theories of inequality between groups in historical perspective, from classical to modern industrial times. Discusses and evaluates sociological research in social stratification with regard to different social and cultural groups. Emphasis is on American society.

SOCL 7253. Assets and Social Policy. 3 Hours.

Examines how asset building has emerged as a community development strategy and policy innovation. Explores the shift from consumption-oriented social assistant to asset-based policy in the United States. Overall, asset accounts are the most rapidly growing form of domestic policy. This policy development occurs in the context of increasing income and wealth inequality. Asset-based policies have the potential to exacerbate inequality further, and are doing so because the poor are not included. Examines the significance of assets and how at the present time public policy is part of the structure of asset inequality. Explores asset building policy innovations.

SOCL 7254. Social Movements. 3 Hours.

Examines how groups mobilize collectively to achieve sociopolitical, economic, and cultural change, with a particular focus on the United States. Introduces various social movements and the sociological theories that have attempted to explain them. Draws examples from labor, civil rights, women’s, gay/lesbian liberation, student, antiwar, environmental, antiracist, urban, and global justice movements.

SOCL 7256. Contemporary Issues in Sociology. 3 Hours.

Discuss contemporary issues in sociology. Include supervised readings and written reports on special problems. Prereq. Sociology/anthropology and sociology students only.

SOCL 7257. Contemporary Issues in Sociology. 3 Hours.

Discuss contemporary issues in sociology. Include supervised readings and written reports on special problems.

SOCL 7258. Contemporary Issues in Sociology. 3 Hours.

Discuss contemporary issues in sociology. Include supervised readings and written reports on special problems.

SOCL 7259. Contemporary Issues in Sociology. 3 Hours.

Discuss contemporary issues in sociology. Include supervised readings and written reports on special problems.

SOCL 7260. Sociology of Science, Knowledge, and Technology. 3 Hours.

Offers an interdisciplinary seminar on the sociology of scientific knowledge and its consequences. Topics include the social construction of scientific knowledge and its use in controlling behavior and legitimating social inequality; the political economy of technology development and its cultural effects; and the processes by which society assesses (or fails to assess) and regulates (or does not regulate) the social and environmental consequences of science and technology.

SOCL 7261. Computers and Society. 3 Hours.

Offers a graduate seminar on the social impact of the computer “revolution” on the contemporary world. Topic include conditions of work, education, recreation, privacy, the computer science profession, paradigms of human thought, politics, and social change in the world economy.

SOCL 7262. Children in America: Sociological and Policy Perspective. 3 Hours.

Presents an introduction to the study of children, their problems, and various policy options to resolve these problems. While based on a sociological foundation, the course moves toward an interdisciplinary perspective in exploring such issues as education, family violence, healthcare, and juvenile justice, among others. The course is guided by the principles of social action advocacy in the children’s public policy arena.

SOCL 7263. Social Psychology of Stratification. 3 Hours.

Explores the social psychological dimensions of structured social inequality. Overviews the “social psychologies” embedded in the classical social theorists, then explores the literature on sociological social psychology (as opposed to its psychological cousin), identifying key theoretical frameworks and focusing on “social structure and personality” (or “social structure and attitudes”) research. Explores relevant literatures on various “subjective” responses to stratification including the self-concept, stratum (that is, race, class, or gender) identification and consciousness, the process of legitimation, stratification beliefs (or stratification ideology), racial attitudes, and links between these phenomena and various policy attitudes and preferences (support for affirmative action, wealth redistribution, and so on). Also explores the ways in which such responses may contribute to the maintenance and reproduction of the status quo (social reproduction), and social change.

SOCL 7264. Urban Poverty and Social Policy. 3 Hours.

Explores the causes and consequences of poverty and how it is experienced in America’s inner cities. Each week students are required to read a selected text that focuses on a sociological theory or concept related to urban poverty. Topics include employment, family structure, crime and social control, education, culture, and neighborhoods. One of the key objectives is to examine the advantages and disadvantages of various policies designed to address the persistence of poverty and/or its attendant problems and consider the effectiveness of these strategies for poverty reduction at the individual or community level.

SOCL 7265. Sociology of Gender. 3 Hours.

Examines the origins of feminist sociology, its contributions to gender studies and to sociology, and directions of research. Covers feminist critiques of mainstream sociology, i.e., Parsonian structural functionalism, as well as of critical or Marxist sociology. Theoretical debates include critique of “sex role” theory and its replacement by multilayered notions of gender. That is, we conceptualize gender as macro-institutional and ideological, as an interactional accomplishment, and an aspect of identity. Includes intersectional theories and research, global/transnational concerns, studies of masculinities, and the place of the body and sexuality studies. This is a graduate seminar. Prereq. Restricted to the following majors: criminal justice; health science/public health; history; journalism; law and public policy; nursing; political science; public administration; sociology; urban and regional policy; and women’s, gender, and sexuality studies.

SOCL 7267. Environment, Health, and Society. 3 Hours.

Studies contested illnesses, which are diseases or conditions in which there is dispute over environmental causation. For many diseases and conditions attributed to environmental and occupational exposure, the disease or condition and/or its causes are discovered by laypeople in workplaces and communities, with considerable attention to chemical exposures. This seminar synthesizes a diverse set of fields, encompassing environmental sociology, medical sociology, medical anthropology, science studies, history of medicine, history of science, environmental health, community-based participatory research, environmental justice, and environmental public health. Emphasizes both political economic and ideological factors as determinants of contestation. Also examines issues of interdisciplinary collaboration between social scientists and environmental health scientists.

SOCL 7268. Globalization and the City. 3 Hours.

Considers the conditions of cities and their residents in the era of globalization. Cities have always been located at the center of regional and global networks of trade, capital, and culture. Even so, urban sociology has tended to treat cities as closed systems, defined more by internal logics than by broader social and economic forces. Since the early 1990s, however, shifts under way in the global economy, information and communications technologies, political movements, and cultural processes have altered the way that scholars (and policy makers, planners, architects, urban residents, etc.) look at cities. Increasingly, the world’s cities are regarded as nodes in global networks; and correspondingly, urban social and spatial processes are being viewed through global lenses.

SOCL 7270. Sociology of Work and Employment. 3 Hours.

Examines the ways in which work organizations powerfully shape individual and social life. Traces such influences with particular emphasis on how organizations differentially affect the distribution of job rewards across class, gender and racial/ethnic lines. Topics include the historical evolution of the management/worker relationship, job segregation by both race and gender, the impact of new technologies on social inequality, the relation between gender and professional careers, govermental efforts to ensure equal opportunity, and the impact of workplace transformation on racial and gender inequalities at work. Prereq. Not open to students in the College of Computer and Information Science or the College of Engineering.

SOCL 7272. Globalization: Social and Political Theoretical Debates. 3 Hours.

Overviews contemporary theoretical debates over the social, political, and cultural dimensions of globalization and transnationalism. Examines challenges and effects of globalization on the core concerns of political sociology; and the future of democracy, the nation-state, the welfare state, and civil society including such transnational social movements as global feminism.

SOCL 7273. Gender and Social Policy. 3 Hours.

Provides an introduction to gender and social policy, with emphasis on intersections of inequalities based on class, race, and sexuality. The focus is on equality policies in employment including family-friendly measures and antidiscrimination policies. Includes those focused on child care, poverty, reproduction, and sexuality. Examines the intersections of family, economy, sexuality, and state from a variety of perspectives including cross-national and comparative analysis.

SOCL 7274. Cultural Studies. 3 Hours.

Introduces cultural studies as an interdisciplinary investigation of how modes and formations of difference among cultural practices are represented sociologically and historically in the social sciences and humanities. Is intended to elucidate debates among the various critical disciplines of the “human sciences” in regard to recent changes in the meaning and use of the term “culture” in history, sociology, literature, cinema studies, and politics. The form of this inquiry is critical. By this is meant that theory and method are conceived of qualitatively and as moments of conceptualization and self-reflection, and that the course draws on various literatures that now operate critically and self-critically at the intersection of the various academic fields including dialectics, structuralism and its critical variants, feminist theory, and writings on postcolonialism.

SOCL 7287. Social Movements in Health. 3 Hours.

Offers a graduate seminar centering on health social movements. Also explores general social movement theory and research. Uses concepts from science and technology studies and covers some core medical sociology concerns such as health inequalities; personal experience of illness; and lay-professional disputes over disease identification, causation, prevention, and treatment. Among the movements covered are disability rights, breast cancer activism, medical activism, black health movements, environmental justice, community health centers, patients’ rights, and health access movements.

SOCL 7290. Intergroup Relations. 3 Hours.

Examines the relations between various racial, national, cultural, and religious groups, with emphasis on historical development. Emphasis is on American society with its specific problems of adjustment and assimilation.

SOCL 7291. American Society. 3 Hours.

Provides an introduction to mental health and mental illness. Presents a number of perspectives on mental health and illness, including biological, genetic, and psychological approaches; however, the course focuses on the role of social factors in mental health and mental healthcare by examining the role of social factors in the etiology, course, and treatment of mental illness. Students have an opportunity to learn about the social consequences of mental illness, such as stigma, and explore ways to prevent these consequences. In addition, prevention, rehabilitation, and recovery are discussed. The social and political contexts within which mental health and mental illness occur are discussed as well as the role of professionals. This course is taught with attention to an interdisciplinary perspective.

SOCL 7292. Graduate Seminar on Growth with Equity. 3 Hours.

Designed to introduce the graduate political science, sociology, policy, or economics student to the broad area of economic growth and income distribution. Brings together data on historical trends in growth and distribution, reviews alternative theories used to explain economic growth in income inequality, and focuses on various policies to enhance both growth and equity.

SOCL 7293. Public Policy Seminar. 3 Hours.

Concentrates on the scope of the study of public policy, disciplinary contributions to policy analysis and the study of public policy, methods of policy analysis, and models of policy processes.

SOCL 7294. Urban Policy. 3 Hours.

Designed to introduce the graduate political science, sociology, policy, or economics student to the broad area of public policy devoted to the specific problems of large metropolitan areas. Throughout the seminar series, there is a focus on Greater Boston. Discusses issues of racial attitudes and residential segregation, the urban labor market, housing, urban sprawl and transportation, education, public health, and urban planning. Explores links between all of these.

SOCL 7701. Tutorial in Teaching. 3 Hours.

Discusses issues and problems in teaching. This is a required course for all doctoral candidates and should be taken during a semester when the student has major responsibility for designing and executing a course in either sociology or anthropology. Open to doctoral candidates only. Prereq. Master’s degree required.

SOCL 7962. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

SOCL 7976. Directed Study. 1-4 Hours.

Comprises reading and research directed by a faculty member.

SOCL 7978. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers independent work under the direction of members of the department on a chosen topic. Course content depends on instructor.

SOCL 7990. Thesis. 1-4 Hours.

Offers thesis supervision by members of the department.

SOCL 7996. Thesis Continuation. 0 Hours.

Offers continued thesis work conducted under the supervision of a departmental faculty.

SOCL 8400. Planning Module in Urban and Regional Policy. 1 Hour.

Relates a professional activity to urban and regional planning.

SOCL 8673. Master’s Paper in Sociology. 3 Hours.

Comprises empirical or library research meeting the criteria for publication in a professional journal. Supervised by members of the department.

SOCL 8960. Exam Preparation—Doctoral. 0 Hours.

Offers the student the opportunity to prepare for the PhD qualifying exam under faculty supervision.

SOCL 8966. Practicum. 1-4 Hours.

Provides eligible students with an opportunity for practical experience.

SOCL 8982. Readings. 1-4 Hours.

Offers selected readings under the supervision of a faculty member.

SOCL 8984. Research. 1-4 Hours.

Offers an opportunity to conduct research under faculty supervision.

SOCL 8986. Research. 0 Hours.

Offers the student the opportunity to conduct full-time research.

SOCL 9000. PhD Candidacy Achieved. 0 Hours.

Indicates successful completion of the doctoral comprehensive exam.

SOCL 9984. Research. 1-4 Hours.

Offers an opportunity to conduct research under faculty supervision.

SOCL 9986. Research. 0 Hours.

Offers the student the opportunity to conduct full-time research.

SOCL 9990. Dissertation. 0 Hours.

Offers theoretical and experimental work conducted under the supervision of a departmental faculty.

SOCL 9996. Dissertation Continuation. 0 Hours.

Offers continued thesis work conducted under the supervision of a departmental faculty.