History

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Heather Streets-Salter, PhD
Associate Professor and Chair


Katherine Luongo, PhD
Associate Professor and Graduate Program Director, PhD and MA (World History)

Martin Blatt, PhD
Professor of the Practice and Graduate Program Director, MA (Public History)

249 Meserve Hall
617.373.2662
617.373.3661 (fax)
gradhistory@northeastern.edu

Graduate Programs Contact
Bonne Knipfer, Graduate Program Administrator

Graduate Programs Booklet
 

Graduate work in history focuses on global and world history, which study the interactions among geographical regions and historical processes around the globe. Students at both the master’s and doctoral levels concentrate their work on the history of regions or peoples in Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America, or the United States, with attention to the intersections and connections between national, regional, and global developments. The Department of History also offers a master’s degree with a concentration in public history that emphasizes the study of topics such as material culture, historical exhibits and museums, historical agencies, and archival administration. Recent doctoral students have been the recipients of major fellowships for conducting dissertation research abroad, including Fulbright, Fulbright-Hays, Social Science Research Council, and Chateaubriand fellowships.

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Master of Arts (MA)

Graduate Certificate

History Courses

HIST 5101. Theory and Methodology 1. 3 Hours.

Examines the following questions in the context of major issues in current historical research and debate. Where do historical questions come from, and how do we answer them? How do we produce knowledge about historical events and processes? What theoretical models guide historians work? Emphasizes interdisciplinary approaches as well as concrete techniques in historical research. Required of all first-year graduate students. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing; history majors only.

HIST 5102. Theory and Methodology 2. 3 Hours.

Continues HIST 5101. Offers an advanced exploration of the theories and methods used by historians to develop students’ ability to understand and critique the work of other historians. Emphasis is on theories and methods in world history, such as comparative models, systemic approaches, and focus on interconnections. Explores what it means to have a local, national, or global perspective, and how world history fits in with other fields of historical scholarship. Required of all PhD students. Prereq. HIST 5101 and junior, senior, or graduate standing.

HIST 5111. Money, Markets, Commodities: Global Economic History. 3 Hours.

Studies money, markets, and commodities in world history. Focuses on the questions that historians have asked about economic phenomena and relations and the different strategies they have developed to address those questions. Broadly, the works analyzed fall into the historiographical categories of social history, political economy, history from below, economic history, and cultural history. These boundaries, however, are challenged as quickly as they are defined. Topics include debt and credit; market economies and consumer societies; formal, informal, legal, and illegal trade networks; and the transformation of the global economy by specific commodities.

HIST 5237. Issues and Methods in Public History. 3 Hours.

Examines and analyzes major issues and methods in public history in the United States and the world. Topics include the nature and meaning of national memory and myth, the theory and practice of historic preservation, rural and land preservation and the organizational structures and activities associated with those efforts, the interrelationship of historical museums and popular culture, the history and organization of historic house museums, historical documentary filmmaking, historical archaeology in world perspective, interpreting “ordinary” landscapes, and the impact of politics on public history. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

HIST 5238. Managing Nonprofit Organizations. 3 Hours.

Examines the management of nonprofit organizations, which include historical agencies, museums, archives, historic houses, and various special historical collections. The literature on historical administration is lacking in sufficient conceptual rigor to generalize about the inner and outer workings of a complex management organization. Since historical agencies and museums are complex organizations with missions and goals, and with policies and procedures for involving various “publics” in their activities, explores them as part of the changing and evolving organizational structure of a modern society. Covers public management with all of its institutional components and human complexities. Studies planning in the public sector, budgeting, fundraising, conflict resolution, and the human relations literature as it relates to becoming a functional and successful manager. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

HIST 5239. Media and History. 3 Hours.

Introduces students to the variety of chemical and electronic media, and the appropriate uses of these media for teaching, preservation, outreach, and primary research documents. Each student engages in research related to the selection and evaluation of existing media, and on the deconstruction, analysis, evaluation, and assembly of documentary presentations. Students then form research and production teams for the creation of actuality media production, which takes place during the semester. Topics include media preservation, production budgeting, marketing, and intellectual property. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

HIST 5240. Historical Societies and Archives. 3 Hours.

Analyzes the varieties of historical societies (local, state, and national) and the kinds of private (business, college, and church) and public (local, state, and national) archives; their activities and procedures; and their similarities and differences. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

HIST 5241. Exhibits and Museums. 3 Hours.

Considers the history of museums and exhibitions from a transnational perspective in order to examine the various roles museums have played in historical and contemporary global culture. Explores museums as cultural institutions and institutional cultures through historical and theoretical readings, museum visits, and the development of students’ own exhibitions. Currently among the world’s most popular sites of education and leisure, museums have held a wide range of social, political, and cultural roles over the past 500 years. Offers students an opportunity to develop more acute insight into the ways museums and their exhibitions have made and reflected ideas about history, science, art, identity, and culture.

HIST 5242. Historical Editing. 3 Hours.

Introduces the practice and skills of historical editing. Emphasis is on identification and explication of documents within their historical context in preparation for publication. Presents a laboratory for the study and practice of historical editing. Introduces the major collections of edited papers and instructs students in editing historical documents. Gives each student a historical document to prepare for publication. Also covers the editing of history books and journals. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

HIST 5243. Industrial Archaeology. 3 Hours.

Introduces the history, practice, and place of industrial archaeology. Plans examination of techniques and procedures used to unearth the industrial past and offers field trips to local industrial sites. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

HIST 5244. Historic Preservation. 3 Hours.

Introduces historic preservation, with attention to the history, the philosophy, and the practical problems of preservation. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

HIST 5245. Historical Analysis of Public Policy. 3 Hours.

Introduces the historical study of public policy, concentrating on the theoretical and methodological issues. Substantive illustrations focus mainly on the United States. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

HIST 5246. Oral History. 3 Hours.

Discusses the theory and practice of creating, processing, and using primary source material obtained by taping interviews with people whose role in history would otherwise go unrecorded. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

HIST 5247. Historical Reenactment. 3 Hours.

Explores the methodologies and approaches involved in historic reenactment. Introduces students to live representation of a historic individual within the context of the correlating historical time period. Historical reenactment synthesizes the tools of historical research with those of live performance and audience interaction. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

HIST 5248. Historical Administration. 3 Hours.

Examines complex, formal organizations, with emphasis on historical agencies. Topics include personnel relationships, the characteristics of successful managers, and strategic planning. Issues of finance, budgeting, and proposal writing are priorities in this professional course for public history majors. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

HIST 5295. Population in History. 3 Hours.

Examines through population studies and historical demography the causes and consequences of changes in human marriage, birth, death, and migration rates from the Stone Age to the present on a global scale. Focuses on the role of the environment, relative economic growth, differential nutritional status, epidemic disease, family systems, and public administration in tracing the modern population explosion, highlighting the process through which human agency brought contagious diseases under better control and extended human life expectancies, before medicine could cure disease. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

HIST 5976. Directed Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers independent work under the direction of members of the department on chosen topics. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

HIST 5978. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers independent work under the direction of members of the department on a chosen topic. Course content depends on instructor. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

HIST 5984. Research. 1-4 Hours.

Offers an opportunity to conduct research under faculty supervision. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

HIST 6870. Directed Study in Chinese History. 3 Hours.

Offers graduate students an opportunity to undertake advanced study in Chinese history.

HIST 6871. Directed Study in World History. 3 Hours.

Offers graduate students an opportunity to undertake advanced study in topics in world history.

HIST 6960. Exam Preparation—Master’s. 0 Hours.

Offers the student the opportunity to prepare for the master’s qualifying exam under faculty supervision.

HIST 6962. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

HIST 6966. Practicum. 1-4 Hours.

Provides eligible students with an opportunity for practical experience.

HIST 7000. Qualifying Exam. 0 Hours.

Provides eligible students with an opportunity to take the master’s qualifying exam.

HIST 7201. European Social History 1650–1850. 3 Hours.

Designed to help history graduate students develop a research/teaching subfield in European social history, 1650-1850. The goal is to work as a collective to inform fellow students about the special problems, sources, and themes in European social history.

HIST 7202. Topics in Russian History. 3 Hours.

Offers reading and discussion on the historiography of special themes in Russian history. Student papers and presentations are based on reading in selected subfields.

HIST 7203. Topics in Soviet History. 3 Hours.

Offers reading and discussion on the historiography of special themes in Soviet history. Student papers and presentations are based on reading in selected subfields.

HIST 7204. Topics in East European History. 3 Hours.

Offers reading and discussion on the historiography of special themes in East European history. Student papers and presentations are based on reading in selected subfields.

HIST 7205. Nations and Nationalism. 3 Hours.

Reviews a selection of the current literature on state building and nationalism from roughly 1789 to 1950. Considers Europe as its primary field of inquiry, but also ventures outside of Europe to examine the relationship between European state building, nationalism, imperialism, and colonialism. Examines nationalism and the processes of state building both as discourses and as political practices, looking at foundational texts on the nation, nationalism, and state policy. Emphasis is on the intersections of gender, class, and race in creating and maintaining national identities.

HIST 7206. Gender, Colonialism, and Postcolonialism. 3 Hours.

Examines how gender, race, and class influenced the experience of colonialism (for both colonial subjects and European colonizers); how colonialism operated with respect to gender, race, and sexuality; and how gender and race differences shaped postcolonial societies and individuals’ experiences. Topics include theoretical frameworks for study of the intersections of gender, race, sexuality, and colonialism; sexuality and empire; race, feminism, and colonialism; and the feminization of the labor force in global capitalism. Students gain experience reading primary sources including the reports of missionaries, diaries and journals of travelers, legal texts, and newspapers that attempted to represent and regulate the relations between Europeans and non-Europeans.

HIST 7207. The Renaissance. 3 Hours.

Discusses European political and cultural life from the thirteenth to the seventeenth centuries, with emphasis on humanism and to the rebirth of classicism in literature and the arts.

HIST 7208. Topics in Early Modern Europe. 3 Hours.

Examines recent interpretations of and approaches to such topics as the Renaissance and Reformation; the “crisis” in Europe, 1540-1660; gender roles; the French Revolution; and popular culture. Emphasizes recent monographs and journal literature. Requires oral presentations and short critical essays.

HIST 7209. World War I. 3 Hours.

Provides a global analysis of the causes, prosecution, and outcomes of the twentieth century’s pivotal conflict, focusing on historiographic frameworks and controversies and on current research on the subject. Explores strategic and military, diplomatic and domestic political, economic and financial, social and psychological, cultural, intellectual, and religious aspects of the war, and their mutual impacts on one another.

HIST 7210. Atlantic Revolutions. 3 Hours.

Studies the earliest revolutions of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries in order to understand better how revolution became an integral part of modern consciousness and ideology. Beginning in England, the early revolutions flared on both sides of the Atlantic, moving from England to the thirteen colonies, to France, and to Haiti. Examines the way in which these early revolutions influenced and cross-fertilized one another, extending their implications to the political, social, and cultural spheres. Like ships, goods, diseases, and human beings, ideologies flowed across the ocean, changing human consciousness in the process. With the development of revolutionary philosophies, radical participatory politics had become an integral part of modernity. Students read selections from a number of works that discuss these early revolutions and their implications and write a research paper.

HIST 7211. Anthropology and History. 3 Hours.

Studies a number of works by anthropologists who have been particularly influential upon historiography, such as Douglas, Geertz, Sahlins, Bordieu, and others. Discusses the application of this body of works to historical writing, and also questions the applicability of the anthropological approach. Students write a research paper illustrating the use of anthropological history to address a particular historical problem.

HIST 7212. Comparative State Building. 3 Hours.

Examines the development of nation-states, emphasizing the period between 1760 and 1940. Emphasis is on militarism, economic growth and its consequences, the rise of classes, nationalism, the evolution of welfare states, and administrative government.

HIST 7213. Political Reform in America. 3 Hours.

Examines movements to reform government in the United States and their results since the late nineteenth century. Emphasis is on responses to industrialism during the Gilded Age, Populism, Progressive Era, the New Deal, the Great Society, and the Reagan Revolution. Analyzes transnational influences on political change.

HIST 7214. Wealth and Poverty in the Modern World. 3 Hours.

Traces the history of industrialization and analyzes the impact of economic growth on individual standards of living in the affluent and lesser developed nations between 1815 and the present.

HIST 7215. Colonial American: Eighteenth Century. 3 Hours.

Studies expansion of European colonies in North America, conflicts among European nations and with indigenous people, development of social, economic, and political institutions, and resulting development of an American awareness.

HIST 7216. American Education in World Perspective. 3 Hours.

Examines the expansion of public education from the passage of compulsory schooling laws to the establishment of the multiuniversity and the problems facing American education in the 1990s. Gives attention to views that common schooling and land-grant colleges were part of the larger movement to extend democracy. Examines challenges to these propositions in detail.

HIST 7217. Modern American Social History. 3 Hours.

Examines recent historical literature on changes in American society over the last hundred years. Possible topics include race, ethnicity, class, gender, migration, demography, deviance, and social policy.

HIST 7218. Cultural History of the U.S.. 3 Hours.

Analyzes recent major works in the cultural history of the United States. Readings include examples of the various methodological components in the practice of what has been termed “the new cultural history.” These include works that draw upon folklore and folk life studies, material culture studies, literary theory, cultural anthropology, architectural history, art history, and social and intellectual history. Sources include both popular and elite cultural forms.

HIST 7219. Topics in Cultural History. 3 Hours.

Offers special topics in cultural history.

HIST 7220. North American Environmental History. 3 Hours.

Analyzes recent major works in the environmental history of North America. Readings include the works of historians that transcend nation boundaries and focus on the effects of human activities on changing the land, forests, wildlife and wildlife habitat, and water and air quality. Many of these works are multidisciplinary and include the writings of natural scientists and social scientists.

HIST 7221. Topics in World History. 3 Hours.

Offers readings on selected themes and issues in world history.

HIST 7222. Approaches to World History. 3 Hours.

Offers a graduate-level survey of world history, intended for prospective teachers of world history at secondary and introductory college levels. Reviews the subject matter and teaching materials for world history and emphasizes narrative, major themes, analytical approaches, debates, texts, collateral readings, and multimedia resources.

HIST 7223. Global Environmental History. 3 Hours.

Designed for students committed to studying the broad sweep of global history from an environmental perspective. Focuses on the dynamic relationship between human communities, civilizations, and the earth itself. Addresses the history of climate change, agriculture, industrialization, globalization, and the evolution of new energy technologies in an environmental context that cuts across both national boundaries and broad historical time periods from ancient times to the present.

HIST 7224. Global Japan. 3 Hours.

Examines the history of Japan in regional and global context from prehistory to recent times. Topics include the archaeological record of archaic East Asia, the incorporation of Japan into the cultural zone in the sixth to eighth centuries C.E., Japan as a center of Buddhism, early contacts with Europe in the sixteenth century, Japan as an early-modern East Asian empire, state formation under European influence in the late nineteenth century, imperialism, colonialism, war and defeat, and the rise of Japan as a global economy in the twentieth century. Readings in primary and secondary sources are in English translation.

HIST 7225. Contemporary Japan. 3 Hours.

Examines Japanese society, economics, and politics from the institution of the American Occupation until the end of the century. Emphasis is on the rebuilding of Japan after the war, the rise of a thriving consumer culture in the 1970s, Japan’s emergence as an economic superpower in the 1980s, urban culture, the LDP, Japanese-American relations, and the status of Koreans and other minorities.

HIST 7226. Engendering China. 3 Hours.

Explores gender dynamics and roles in China from the sixteenth century to the present. Pays particular attention to social constructions of masculinity and femininity in Confucian culture, the operations of patriarchy, marriage practices, female agency, and the male critique of women’s subordination in late imperial times. Examines how these cultural and social practices were transformed or inscribed during the turbulent twentieth century.

HIST 7227. Twentieth-Century China: Revolutionary Change in a Global Context. 3 Hours.

Assesses the impact of the Chinese Communist Revolution of 1949 on state-societal relations. Focuses initially on the Mao era, particularly state-sponsored efforts to transform Chinese society through social mobilization campaigns, political culture, industrialization, and rural collectivization. Explores the impact of the economic reform policies initiated after 1978, emphasizing the social impact of globalizing economic forces, the rise of a consumer culture, the development of a legal system, and the ethnic relations between Han Chinese and minority populations, especially in Tibet and Xinjiang.

HIST 7228. Atlantic Connections. 3 Hours.

Explores the interactions of Europe, the Americas, and Africa from the fifteenth through the seventeenth centuries. With background on societies in each region, the course proceeds through study of the developing concepts and practices of power, race, and gender as these emerged out of the initial encounters and early colonization, and as they led to reshaping of life in each region.

HIST 7229. History of Exploration. 3 Hours.

Offers a comprehensive survey of planetary exploration from ancient times to the present, with emphasis on the ways in which historians have reconstructed the motives of the explorers and the institutions that supported them, the technologies developed and utilized in the process, the impacts of the contacts made on both the regions discovered and on the explorers’ home societies, and on the cultural and environmental impacts of the contacts on the world in general.

HIST 7230. Life at Sea. 3 Hours.

Examines the role of the individual at sea through history and literature. Emphasizes the concepts of shipboard law and authority as well as observations on the notion of the “voyage” and the maturation process. Requires an all-day Saturday field trip.

HIST 7231. African-American History 1. 3 Hours.

Covers the history of African-Americans to 1900, with emphasis on the role of black people in slavery and freedom.

HIST 7232. African-American History 2. 3 Hours.

Considers African-American history since 1900.

HIST 7233. Latino/a History in the U.S.. 3 Hours.

Explores the Latino/a population, the fastest-growing ethnic population in the United States. Despite all the recent media attention given to these groups, their history remains largely obscure. Furthermore, the diversity within the Latino/a population is seldom studied. Explores the historiography about Latinos/as in the United States and compares it with that of other immigrant and ethnic communities. Discusses the question of Latino/a ethnic identity.

HIST 7234. The African Diaspora. 3 Hours.

Provides an exploration of Africa and the African diaspora in the modern period. Focuses on two sets of themes, each within a distinct time frame. Addresses the peopling of the African diaspora through the slave trade and other movements, for the period from the sixteenth to the nineteenth centuries, as well as the cultural patterns and changes of various diaspora communities, and the relationship of culture in the diaspora to that on the African continent. Also addresses pan-African politics and identity in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries including nationalism and nation-building in Africa and abroad, as well as other elements of pan-African identity as reflected in music, dress, and speech.

HIST 7235. Third World Women. 3 Hours.

Offers a critical examination of the complex gender dynamics shaping the lives of women in nonwestern societies from colonial times until the present. Deconstructs the term “Third World” and sees how it can be read against the context of imperialism. Examines gender constructs in relationship to racial and class hierarchies. Other topics include patterns of gender domination and female resistance, the interplay of imperialist and patriarchal forms of domination under colonial rule, the western gaze and representations of Third World “primitive” women, and the feminization of labor and the global economy.

HIST 7236. Caribbean History. 3 Hours.

Studies the history of the Caribbean region in the modern period. Focuses on political, social, and cultural history. Develops and compares the historical experiences of Spanish-, English-, and French-speaking territories. Topics include colonial rule, comparative slave societies, abolition and emancipation, cultural life, social movements, twentieth-century authoritarian politics and economic development models, industrialization and urbanization, and immigration.

HIST 7237. Legal History around the World. 3 Hours.

Offers an overview of major topics and approaches in the field of legal history. Draws from readings examining the many uses, purposes, and meanings of law in different contexts around the world from the early modern period into the twentieth century. Explores the dynamics and tensions between law as centered in the state (top-down) and law as practiced in society (bottom-up) to seek to understand law’s many manifestations. Surveys the diverse methodologies of legal history—the ways scholars have used legal codes, cases, and events to understand and chart social, cultural, economic, and historical change.

HIST 7238. Colonialism in Contemporary Africa. 3 Hours.

Introduces the various sources, methodologies, and theories employed by Africanist scholars. Traces the development of African studies and of key frameworks within the discipline. Focuses on what kinds of sources Africanists mobilize and how this source base has changed over time; the change in issues that Africanists focus on; how Africanist scholarship fits within history overall; recommendations Africanist scholars make about “doing” history; how Africanist scholarship engages with theory and other “areas” or disciplines; and what sorts of problems theory helps Africanists address.

HIST 7239. Space and Place. 3 Hours.

Examines the role of space and place in the constitution of society and culture through a set of key readings. Themes include the geographical production of class, gender, and race/ethnicity in modernity and postmodernity as well as the role of space and place in debates around postcolonialism. The ways in which space and place are implicated in the practice of power and resistance are key to the course.

HIST 7240. Visual and Material Culture. 3 Hours.

Explores approaches to and issues in the history of material and visual culture from 1700 to the present. Through formal analysis of objects and images; readings in criticism, theory, and history; and site visits, considers questions of cultural and social reproduction, capitalism and consumption, materiality, intermediation, technology, spectatorship, and media specificity. Offers students an opportunity to obtain a more sophisticated understanding of the ways that visual and material culture have altered cultural, social, and perceptual customs; have more confidence interpreting such sources as historical evidence; and be able to employ such sources in the practice of public history.

HIST 7249. Publishing: History and Practice. 3 Hours.

Designed to instill a healthy skepticism for the printed word and to help students become better producers and consumers of historical materials. In the course’s “History of the Book” component, students have an opportunity to examine the evolution of publishing in the United States as it involved relationships among writers, publishers, editors, printers, booksellers, readers, and librarians. Throughout the course, students have opportunities to develop and practice publishing skills. After having the opportunity to achieve a basic competency in the history and practice of publishing, students then weigh in on current problems in the trade: electronic distribution and its impact on traditional publishing; open access and editorial gate keeping; copyright infringement and plagiarism; for-profit versus nonprofit publishing; and the shifting role of libraries.

HIST 7250. Topics in Public History. 3 Hours.

Offers readings, class work, and projects on selected themes and issues in public history.

HIST 7251. Topics in American History. 3 Hours.

Focuses on one or more topics in the history of the United States.

HIST 7252. Topics in Middle Eastern History. 3 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to read and discuss the historiography of special themes in Middle Eastern history. Student papers and presentations are based on reading in selected subfields.

HIST 7255. American Urban History. 3 Hours.

Explores the history of U.S. cities from 1630 to the present with an emphasis on more recent history. While the topics covered include race, class, gender, violence, globalization, and disasters, the major themes are physical planning and urban infrastructure.

HIST 7257. Race and Gender Encounters: U.S. Encounters with Empire. 3 Hours.

Examines the influence of race and gender identities and ideologies in the U.S.’s encounter with empire from the mid-nineteenth century through the twentieth century. Uses course-directed readings to examine how race, gender, class, and other factors help promote a U.S. national identity in the international world. Also explores how these factors shape and influence U.S. foreign policy as well as intimate, everyday interactions between men, women, and children.

HIST 7260. The Mediterranean World: Historiographic Approaches. 3 Hours.

Begins with Fernand Braudel’s landmark work on the Mediterranean in the sixteenth century and goes on to explore the historiography surrounding Mediterranean studies. Themes include the Mediterranean as a continuous space for exchange, interaction, and synthesis in the ancient, medieval, and modern periods; migrational patterns and labor movements across the Mediterranean; the Mediterranean as a site for colonial encounters; the discourse about the Mediterranean during the fascist period; the postcolonial construct of a “North/South” divide; and the issues of a common Mediterranean culture, environment, and heritage.

HIST 7290. Race and Gender Frontiers: U.S. Encounters with Empire. 3 Hours.

Examines the influence of race and gender identities and ideologies in the United States’ encounter with empire from the mid-nineteenth century through the twentieth century. Uses course-directed readings to examine how race, gender, class, and other factors help promote a U.S. national identity in the international world. Offers students an opportunity to explore how these factors shaped and influenced not only U.S. foreign policy but also intimate, everyday interactions between men, women, and children.

HIST 7296. The Ocean: Trans-Regional Histories, Routes, and Discourses. 3 Hours.

Addresses the communicative, transactional, and transitional aspects of oceanic space. The sea gives shape to and is shaped by cultural, economic, and political processes. Surveys the ways in which the ocean has been a medium for sustenance and transformation; a plane of integration and a route for human interaction; a place of contemplation, confrontation, pleasure, and subjection. Considers the discursive and legal divisions of the sea but keeps in mind that the ocean has been a critical means of global integration precisely because it is a single body.

HIST 7297. The British Atlantic. 3 Hours.

Examines the context of British encounters in the Atlantic during the seventeenth through the nineteenth centuries, focusing on an analysis of developments in society and culture, politics, economics, race, gender, and class. Considers contacts and connections between cultures, and the consequences of those interactions, and investigates how Britons experienced their empire both in the metropole and in the peripheries. Also studies the movement of peoples and ideas across the Atlantic and compares the British imperial project to the colonizing endeavors of the Spanish, French, and Dutch.

HIST 7301. Research Seminar in Russian History. 3 Hours.

Offers a seminar on selected themes of Russian history.

HIST 7302. Research Seminar in Soviet History. 3 Hours.

Offeres a seminar on selected themes of Soviet history.

HIST 7303. Research Seminar in East European History. 3 Hours.

Offers a seminar on selected themes of East European history.

HIST 7304. Research Seminar in Gender and Society in the Modern World. 3 Hours.

Studies feminists’ claims-making; the meanings of masculinity at work and in arguments for citizenship; sexuality and rights; masculinity and femininity; and examines how gender, as a system of cultural practices and power relations, intersected with class and race to influence the meanings of citizenship, work, state policy, and sexuality. Discusses the social practices and political consequences of those meanings. Considers topics such as gender and the “democratic” European revolutions of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries; the ways in which gender shaped the meanings of work, skill, and the body; the importance of race in European war; and the emergence of modern welfare states. Although this course takes Europe as its point of departure, it also explores how Europeans operated as part of a transnational, if not global, economic and political system from the late eighteenth century to the 1950s.

HIST 7305. Research Seminar in Society and Culture in Modern Europe. 3 Hours.

Explores a variety of themes and debates in the social and cultural history of Europe in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Discusses new thinking about the emergence of industrial societies, middle-class and working-class culture, consumption and consumer culture, the development of national identities, and debates about the notion of class in European history. Examines the impact of imperialism on European culture and society, the broad cultural and social consequences of war on the home front, and commemoration of war. Students conduct research using primary sources, such as newspapers, government documents (such as Parliamentary papers), and other published documentary collections, diaries, and visual materials.

HIST 7306. Research Seminar in Twentieth-Century Europe. 3 Hours.

Offers a seminar in which the faculty selects a single topic in contemporary history on which the course is focused. The classes themselves analyze and evaluate the history, historiography, issues, and current research agendas of the subject, while individual class members undertake and complete research papers on particular aspects of the topic of interest to them. Past topics have included the Great Depression, the rise of Fascism, the Holocaust, and the Cold War in Europe.

HIST 7307. Research Seminar in Travel Literature. 3 Hours.

Studies some of the major theoretical works on travel literature and on encounters with the “other” in general. Travel literature is a crucial source that historians can utilize to examine a number of topics extending from national identity to the development of ethnography to perceptions of gender. Examines some of the sources available to graduate students in a variety of fields in preparation for writing papers, and discusses a variety of methodological approaches for analyzing primary source material. Then concentrates on a research paper to be turned in at the end of the semester, with students presenting their research sequentially through the course of the term.

HIST 7308. Research Seminar in Autobiographies and Life Statements. 3 Hours.

Examines how cultural or political historians often find that autobiographies, diaries, letters, and various other life statements provide one of their richest sources because of their comprehensiveness and detail. Yet these sources also present difficulties because of problems of veracity and because they present a narrative that may in the end run counter to that of the historian. Explores some of the attempts to overcome these problems and to use such sources in a historical narrative. In the second part of the course, students write a research paper, presenting their research sequentially through the course of the term.

HIST 7309. Research Seminar in Colonial and Revolutionary America. 3 Hours.

Offers an in-depth examination of particular topics of the period, with an emphasis on bibliographic development and the use of archival materials.

HIST 7310. Research Seminar in North American History. 3 Hours.

Offers individual projects on an aspect of North American history, leading to a documented research paper.

HIST 7311. Research Seminar in Urban History. 3 Hours.

Examines the history of the modern city, with a focus on America and on Boston, and discusses local history sources and their analysis.

HIST 7312. Research Seminar in American History. 3 Hours.

Offers research and writing on selected aspects of American history.

HIST 7313. Research Seminar in Recent American History. 3 Hours.

Studies special topics from the period 1896 to the present in detail. Requires presenting a research paper on a major person, action, or movement.

HIST 7314. Research Seminar in World History. 3 Hours.

Gives students the opportunity to do research and write a paper that addresses historical issues and processes significant at a global scale. Discussions focus on what it means to be significant on a global scale, how to find and utilize relevant source material, and on previous scholarship relevant in helping shape questions and issues in our own work. Students also read and critique one another’s work.

HIST 7315. Research Seminar in Global Social History. 3 Hours.

Offers a research seminar addressing major issues in social history at the global level. Topics include family, demography, community, ethnicity, gender, class, race, and nation. Research papers link a selection of these issues across national and continental boundaries. Recently, the seminar focused on issues of gender, colonialism, and postcolonialism. It examined how gender influenced the experience of colonialism (for both colonial subjects and white colonizers), how colonialism operated with respect to gender and sexuality, and how gender differences were manifested within postcolonial contexts. Considers theoretical frameworks for the study of gender, race, class, and colonialism; notions of masculinity and “machismo”; colonial women subjects; sexuality and empire; the position of white European women as colonizers and as feminists; the postcolonial state as a regulator of sexuality and marriage; and the feminization of the labor force in global capitalism.

HIST 7316. Research Seminar in Global Environmental History. 3 Hours.

Gives students the opportunity to do research and write a paper that addresses historical environmental issues and processes significant at a global scale. Discussions focus on what it means to be environmental on a global scale, how to find and utilize relevant source material, and on how previous scholarship is relevant in helping shape questions and issues in our own work. Students also read and critique one another’s work.

HIST 7317. Research Seminar in Western Perceptions of China. 3 Hours.

Offers a research seminar on the production and uses of a vast array of Western cultural myths and stereotypes about China from the sixteenth century until the present. These images are identified and analyzed in a wide range of primary sources including travelers’ literature, missionary records and letters, fiction, journalistic accounts, visual representations, and scholarly studies.

HIST 7318. Research Seminar in Issues of Teaching Social Issues. 3 Hours.

Using a specific “real world” issue as a case study, the seminar explores the problem from a variety of social science disciplines, each bringing its own methodologies and approaches to bear on the issue. Students from participating departments work on interdisciplinary research teams to produce coherent analyses of the problem and (where appropriate) action plans. Required of all students for Standard Certification in Social Studies.

HIST 7319. Research Seminar in African-American History. 3 Hours.

Offers research and writing on an aspect of African-American history.

HIST 7320. Research Seminar in Cultural History of the United States. 3 Hours.

Requires students to conduct research and write an original paper that addresses historical issues in the cultural history—in particular the material culture—of North America.

HIST 7321. Sail and Steam: The Atlantic 1815–1914. 3 Hours.

Focuses on the interconnections of the Atlantic world from 1450–1900. Examines the consequences of exploration, conquest, and colonization in the New World as well as in the old. During this period ships, goods, diseases, human beings, and ideas flowed across the ocean, tying together the Atlantic basin in a complex web of relationships. We read a number of secondary works discussing the theoretical and comparative analysis of the Atlantic world, focusing upon central cultural themes such as gender, colonialism, social developments, the economy, and the growth and spread of ideologies. Requires students to research and write an original paper about connections in the Atlantic world.

HIST 7322. Seminar: 1968 in Global Perspective. 3 Hours.

Examines the significance of 1968, when a worldwide wave of largely student-driven unrest signaled that “something happened” during that year. From London to Tokyo, from Chicago to Prague, from Mexico City to Paris, the young generation of the late sixties challenged the old order. But why? Engages students with the growing interdisciplinary theoretical literature on international protest movements, before going on to examine a number of national “1968s.” Uses primary and secondary sources to seek to understand what these events meant locally, how they were connected globally, and to what extent they can fit into a larger pattern of a world event known as “1968.” Requires a significant research paper dealing with one of these or another question determined in consultation with the instructor. Prereq. HIST 5101.

HIST 7323. Seminar: Modern Colonialism. 3 Hours.

Focuses on modern colonialism from the seventeenth to the mid-twentieth century, concentrating primarily on European colonialism. Students have an opportunity in this research seminar to investigate many aspects of the colonial project, such as the techniques and practices of empire, the production of knowledge, orientalism and othering, the construction of race and gender, environmental impacts, the growth of nationalism and other forms of resistance, and decolonization. Students are expected to use the methodological and theoretical approaches explored in the course to produce an independent research paper based on primary sources.

HIST 7324. Seminar in Transnational Animal-Human Relations. 3 Hours.

Includes topics such as hunting, the origins of domestication, myth and religion, benign and companion animals (pets), animals as threats, ecosystem modifications (such as the Columbian Exchange), real and imagined cyborgs, biological modification by humans, and animals as food.

HIST 7325. Research Seminar: Modern Africa. 3 Hours.

Examines major issues in African history from 1500 to the present. Explores a variety of topics relating to the African continent’s engagement with the world, including labor, religion, sexuality, and violence. Addresses theoretical and methodological frameworks for understanding colonialism and postcolonialism. Concentrates on the development of Africanist historiography from the 1950s onward. Offers students an opportunity for training in the theories and methods of primary source research using archival documents, literature, oral histories, and media. Requires students to write research papers that examine issues in African history across national and regional boundaries, incorporating the theories and methods considered in class.

HIST 7370. Texts, Maps, and Networks: Readings and Methods for Digital History. 3 Hours.

Introduces the methods and practice of history in a digital age. Offers students an opportunity to see the wide variety of work being done computationally by historians and other humanists today and to obtain the background to be creative producers of new work and critical consumers of existing projects. The rise of computing technology and the Internet has the potential to reshape all parts of historical practice, from curation to research to dissemination. Examines the historian’s craft in three primary domains: the creation of digital sources, the algorithmic transformations that computers can enact on cultural materials like texts, and the new ecologies of publishing and scholarly communication made possible by new media.

HIST 7550. Professionalization and Pedagogy for Historians. 1 Hour.

Offers students an opportunity to attend lectures and workshops organized by faculty members on the topics of professionalization and pedagogy. Topics covered include publishing, conference presentation, CV preparation, grant application, archival research, undergraduate course design, lecture preparation, grading, and discussion leading.

HIST 7701. Advanced Research Seminar in World History. 3 Hours.

Entails research and preparation of a world history paper intended to be part of a larger dissertation. Includes intensive historiographical reading related to the research topic.

HIST 7702. Advanced Seminar in Global Environmental History. 3 Hours.

Entails research and preparation of a global environmental history paper intended to be part of a larger dissertation. Includes intensive historiographical reading related to the research topic.

HIST 7962. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

HIST 7976. Directed Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers independent work under the direction of members of the department on chosen topics.

HIST 7978. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers independent work under the direction of members of the department on a chosen topic. Course content depends on instructor.

HIST 7990. Thesis. 1-4 Hours.

Offers thesis supervision by members of the department.

HIST 7996. Thesis Continuation. 0 Hours.

Offers continuing thesis supervision by members of the department.

HIST 8400. Assigned Readings in Historical Geography. 3 Hours.

Offers directed study in geography’s impact on history. This course may be used to help satisfy teacher certification demands for history, political science and political philosophy, and social studies that has course work in geography.

HIST 8405. Directed Study. 3 Hours.

Offers assigned reading under the supervision of a faculty member.

HIST 8406. Directed Study. 3 Hours.

Offers assigned reading under the supervision of a faculty member.

HIST 8407. Directed Study in Women’s History. 3 Hours.

Offers assigned reading in women’s history under the supervision of a faculty member.

HIST 8408. Teaching Methodology Adjunct. 3 Hours.

Offers a M.A.T. program course adjunct connected to any graduate history course to permit students to consider the curricular and teaching implications of the history course content.

HIST 8409. Practicum in Teaching. 1 Hour.

Offers students the opportunity to teach individual college-level courses within the Department of History under the general supervision of a senior faculty member. Open to doctoral students.

HIST 8410. Fieldwork in History 1. 3 Hours.

Offers students the opportunity to get practical experience in historical agencies including historical societies, archives, museums, exhibits, restorations, preservation projects, and the like. Requires students to work in the agency ten hours a week for one semester under the direction of an agency supervisor and departmental adviser.

HIST 8411. Fieldwork in History 2. 3 Hours.

Gives students a second opportunity to acquire practical experience in an historical agency. Requires ten hours a week for one semester under the direction of an agency supervisor and a departmental adviser.

HIST 8412. Fieldwork in History 3. 3 Hours.

Gives students a third opportunity to acquire practical experience in an historical agency. Requires ten hours a week for one semester under the direction of an agency supervisor and a departmental adviser.

HIST 8416. Directed Study in Managing Nonprofit Organizations. 3 Hours.

Permits students who have completed course work on this subject to undertake advanced applications of study. Prereq. HIST 5238.

HIST 8417. Directed Study in Historical Societies and Archives. 3 Hours.

Permits students who have completed course work on this subject to undertake advanced applications of study. Prereq. HIST 5240.

HIST 8418. Directed Study in Historical Exhibits and Museums. 3 Hours.

Permits students who have completed course work on this subject to undertake advanced applications of study. Prereq. HIST 7214.

HIST 8419. Directed Study in Historical Editing. 3 Hours.

Permits students who have completed course work on this subject to undertake advanced applications of study. Prereq. HIST 5242.

HIST 8420. Directed Study in Historical Consulting. 3 Hours.

Permits students who have completed course work on this subject to undertake advanced applications of study. Prereq. HIST 5243, HIST 5244, or HIST 5245.

HIST 8421. Directed Study in Industrial Archaeology. 3 Hours.

Permits students who have completed course work on this subject to undertake advanced applications of study. Prereq. HIST 5243.

HIST 8422. Directed Study in Historic Preservation. 3 Hours.

Permits students who have completed course work on this subject to undertake advanced applications of study. Prereq. HIST 5244.

HIST 8423. Directed Study in Material Culture. 3 Hours.

Permits students who have completed course work on this subject to undertake advanced applications of study. Prereq. HIST 7218.

HIST 8424. Directed Study in Historical Analysis of Public Policy. 3 Hours.

Permits students who have completed course work on this subject to undertake advanced applications of study. Prereq. HIST 5245.

HIST 8425. Directed Study in Publishing for Nonprofits. 3 Hours.

Permits students who have completed course work on this subject to undertake advanced applications of study. Prereq. HIST 5242.

HIST 8426. Directed Study in Oral History. 3 Hours.

Permits students who have completed course work on this subject to undertake advanced applications of study. Prereq. HIST 5246.

HIST 8427. Directed Study in Genealogical Research. 3 Hours.

Permits students who have completed course work on this subject to undertake advanced applications of study. Prereq. HIST 5244.

HIST 8428. Directed Study in Media and History. 3 Hours.

Permits students who have completed course work on this subject to undertake advanced individual applications projects in media and history. Prereq. HIST 5239.

HIST 8674. Master’s Project in Public History. 3 Hours.

Offers research, development, and completion of a significant project, usually in conjunction with a public history agency, that can be utilized as part of the ongoing programs of such agencies.

HIST 8960. Exam Preparation—Doctoral. 0 Hours.

Intended to show full-time status during the semester of the PhD qualifying exam. Students are expected to carry a full load of research and/or teaching responsibilities in addition to this course.

HIST 8966. Practicum. 1-4 Hours.

Provides eligible students with an opportunity for practical experience.

HIST 8982. Readings. 1-4 Hours.

Offers selected readings under the supervision of a faculty member.

HIST 8984. Research. 1-4 Hours.

Offers an opportunity to conduct research under faculty supervision.

HIST 8986. Research. 0 Hours.

Offers an opportunity to conduct full-time research under faculty supervision.

HIST 9000. PhD Candidacy Achieved. 0 Hours.

Indicates successful completion of the doctoral comprehensive exam.

HIST 9984. Research. 1-4 Hours.

Offers an opportunity to conduct full-time research under faculty supervision.

HIST 9986. Research. 0 Hours.

Offers the student the opportunity to conduct full-time research.

HIST 9990. Dissertation. 0 Hours.

Offers dissertation supervision by members of the department.

HIST 9996. Dissertation Continuation. 0 Hours.

Offers dissertation supervision by members of the department.