School of Criminology and Criminal Justice

 Website

Anthony Braga, PhD
Distinguished Professor and Director

Amy Farrell, PhD
Associate Professor and Associate Director

Gregory Zimmerman, PhD
Associate Professor and Graduate Program Director

204 Churchill Hall
617.373.3327
617.373.8723
sccj@northeastern.edu

Graduate Programs Contact
Laurie Mastone, Graduate Program Administrator, sccj@northeastern.edu

CSSH Graduate Programs General Regulations

The School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Northeastern University seeks to prepare students for professional and research careers in criminal justice, criminology, and related fields by applying multidisciplinary and comparative social science to understand, predict, and explain crime and contribute to the development of public policy within urban communities. Using an active-learning approach, the school seeks to develop its students intellectually and ethically, while providing them with a keen appreciation for the complexities of crime and public and private efforts to make communities safer and to ensure justice. The school offers a Graduate Certificate in Global Criminology, a Master of Science degree in criminology and criminal justice, and a PhD degree in criminology and justice policy. In addition, the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice has recently joined with the School of Law to develop two new programs: the JD/MS in criminology and criminal justice program, and the JD/PhD in criminology and justice policy program.

Criminal Justice Courses

CRIM 5900. Topics in Criminal Justice and Criminology. 3 Hours.

Offers an intensive study of a topic related to criminal justice selected by the instructor. May be repeated up to four times.

CRIM 6962. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions. May be repeated without limit.

CRIM 6964. Co-op Work Experience. 0 Hours.

Provides eligible students with an opportunity for work experience. May be repeated without limit.

CRIM 6966. Practicum. 1-4 Hours.

Provides eligible students with an opportunity for practical experience. May be repeated without limit.

CRIM 7000. Qualifying Exam. 0 Hours.

Provides eligible students with an opportunity to take the master’s qualifying exam.

CRIM 7200. Criminology. 3 Hours.

Provides an overview of the current understanding of the causes of crime from an interdisciplinary perspective. Focuses on the major theories of crime and causation developed over the past two hundred years. Emphasis is on integrating criminological theory and research, assessing the implications of this knowledge base for policies relating to crime control and prevention. Also presents and discusses the most current data regarding the nature and extent of crime in the United States.

CRIM 7201. Global Criminology. 3 Hours.

Examines how the processes of globalization influence crime and criminal justice around the globe. Analyzes globalization and recent developments in global crime, including global trends in policing and security. Explores the global applicability of dominant criminological theories and transferability of crime control policies. Offers students an opportunity to develop an understanding of international criminal justice, particularly as it pertains to war crimes, crimes against humanity, and the global protection of human rights.

CRIM 7202. The Criminal Justice Process. 3 Hours.

Introduces students to the operation of the criminal justice system. Covers the components of the system, the process by which defendants are moved through that system, and key issues in the administration of criminal justice.

CRIM 7208. Law and Society. 3 Hours.

Focuses on the sociology of law; emphasis is also on jurisprudential thought and the political analysis of legal institutions. Explores the sources of law and functions and dysfunctions of law in action. Reviews institutional roles of courts, legislatures, and administrative agencies. Topics include alternative dispute resolution, how the law can help or impede social change, whether Americans have become too litigious, or race and gender issues in achieving justice.

CRIM 7210. Gender, Crime, and Justice. 3 Hours.

Examines ways in which criminology, the criminal justice system, and the law contribute to the social construction of gender. Investigates process through which biological females are encouraged to become girls and women by cultural assumptions about female deviance, discourses on female crime, the criminal justice system, and legal assumptions about the meaning of equality. Focuses on feminist approaches to criminal justice that parallel the new feminist jurisprudence.

CRIM 7212. Juvenile Justice. 3 Hours.

Analyzes critically the policies and practices of the agencies involved in the processing of young persons through the juvenile justice system. Emphasis is on jurisdictional issues, police practices, detention, intake, diversion, adjudication, and dispositions of juveniles within the justice system. Also focuses on the historical development of the juvenile justice system as well as assesses current trends and proposals for reform. Emphasis is on the key policy issues facing juveniles involved with the juvenile justice system today.

CRIM 7214. Corrections Theory and Practice. 3 Hours.

Reviews the history of our correctional system, said by many to have four central themes (revenge, restraint, reformation, and rehabilitation/reintegration). Defines the role and working relationship of corrections in the greater spectrum of criminal justice, identifies and discusses the issues and problems facing the system today, and evaluates its intended purpose vs. how it actually functions. Explores prison operations, from designing and staffing a prison to responsible reintegration. Discussions regarding the political, social, and economic issues that have impacted correction operations, such as sentencing reform, overcrowding, boot camps, and so on, are taken from the classroom to actual prison settings. Provides an overview of corrections through a blend of theory, practice, and firsthand observations.

CRIM 7224. Law and Psychology. 3 Hours.

Offers a seminar on conceptual, empirical, historical, and professional aspects of selected topics in forensic psychology including such areas as law and psychology, competence to stand trial, criminal responsibility, and the insanity defense. Topics include jury selection, reliability and validity of eyewitness testimony, truth detection methods, and postconviction pleadings.

CRIM 7228. Criminal Violence. 3 Hours.

Investigates and analyzes aggression and violence as forms of individual, group, and societal behavior. Includes an assessment of anthropological, biological, philosophical, political, and sociological theories. Combines student presentations and projects with lectures and tutorials.

CRIM 7230. Police and Society. 3 Hours.

Introduces research, theory, and applications of the causes and consequences of police behavior. Discusses a historical review of the role that police have played in society as well as the structure of large and small police organizations. Topics include community policing, problem-solving methods, police discretion, police misconduct, police crime prevention strategies, and restorative justice.

CRIM 7232. Juvenile Law. 3 Hours.

Examines the legal relationship between the juvenile offender and the state. Covers case and statutory law as well as constitutional due process standards in juvenile proceedings. Topics include jurisdiction, prejudicial process, waiver of jurisdiction adjudication, disposition and postdispositional issues, as well as the right to treatment.

CRIM 7234. Criminal Justice Organization and Management. 3 Hours.

Analyzes the structures, functions, and operations of criminal justice agencies including the police, the court, and corrections (jail, probation, prison, and parole) within the context of the entire criminal justice system. Reviews existing organizational theory and examines the application of these theories within agencies of criminal justice. Discusses interjurisdictional and intrajurisdictional issues facing these organizations and ethical dilemmas facing various decision makers.

CRIM 7240. Race and the Criminal Justice System. 3 Hours.

Offers a sociohistorical analysis of the effects of race and ethnicity on legitimate social opportunities, criminal behavior, victimization, and differential judicial processing. Analyzes the impact of assimilation and acculturation on criminal behavior, victimization, and criminal justice processes. Discusses issues resulting from increasing diversity of both the criminal justice workforce and society in general.

CRIM 7242. Terrorism and International Crime. 3 Hours.

Provides an overview of the various approaches to terrorism employed around the world. Discusses the theories of terrorism as well as the major international and national approaches to reducing terrorist threats. Also discusses the role of the news media, the political consequenses of terrorism, the military as a resource, and the role of hostages.

CRIM 7244. Criminal Law and Procedure. 3 Hours.

Discusses the fundamental principles, concepts, and development of criminal law and the constitutional provisions that govern it. Focuses on the relationship of the individual to the state and includes an examination of the general framework of criminal law as a means of social control.

CRIM 7246. Security Management. 3 Hours.

Examines security theories, operations, and practices, emphasizing the administration and management of security. Explores the philosophical background, history, and current role of security as well as the role and status of the security manager in threat assessment, risk prevention, and the protection of assets. Discusses functional-area security systems; law, science, and technology for security; ad issues; and standards, goals, and challenges for the future. Explores security systems, particularly as they relate to criminal justice and the environment.

CRIM 7250. Victimology. 3 Hours.

Involves a scientific study of crime victims and public policy responses to them. Focuses on the nature and extent of criminal victimization, the dynamics of victim-offender relationships (e.g., incest and domestic violence), theories of victimization, a historical analysis of the victim’s role in the criminal justice process, the restorative justice model, and the contemporary victim rights and victim services movement.

CRIM 7252. White-Collar Crime. 3 Hours.

Introduces the concept of white-collar crime as an area of scientific inquiry and theory formation. Uses multiple perspectives and reference points to critically examine the latest scholarship on the subject, ranging from focus on the offense, offender, legal structure, organizational structure, individual and organizational behavior, to victimization and guardianship, with special attention on the interaction between these components. Assesses the nature, extent, and consequences of white-collar crime from a national and international perspective. Also focuses on the criminal justice system’s current efforts at controlling white-collar crime and, given the relative ineffectiveness of traditional criminal justice responses, alternative systems of control. Offers many tangible research-based suggestions regarding actions that organizations and businesses can take to reduce the significant losses accrued to white-collar crime.

CRIM 7256. Courts and Sentencing. 3 Hours.

Designed to provide students with a solid foundational knowledge base in the area of courts and sentencing within a reading- and writing-intensive seminar format. Offers students an opportunity to develop an understanding of the purpose, nature, and structure of courts and their role in the creation and maintenance of law (both domestic and international). Emphasizes the nature and impact of sentencing policy shifts. Also discusses the role of the U.S. Supreme Court and its decisions. Offers students an opportunity to understand the nature and purpose of law; the role of courts in society; the structure of courts and various court processes; the nature and purpose of sentencing; sentencing structure, process, and policy shifts; and appellate court review of sentencing practices.

CRIM 7258. Comparative Criminology. 3 Hours.

Analyzes crime and criminal justice systems in selected countries and cultures. Focuses on the ways these different societies define and respond to criminal behavior. Specifically addresses how different societies structure their justice systems to meet their goals and reflect their values.

CRIM 7260. Topics in Criminal Justice. 3 Hours.

Focuses on a particular aspect of the criminal justice system of contemporary interest. This course rotates annually. May be repeated without limit.

CRIM 7262. Evidence-Based Crime Policy. 3 Hours.

Introduces students to the evidence-based paradigm in crime policy. Presents the theory and methods of the evidence-based paradigm, which places systematic research at the center of the policymaking process. Offers students an opportunity to further develop skills in critically assessing leading research findings and policy initiatives in the field of criminology and criminal justice.

CRIM 7264. Immigration and Crime. 3 Hours.

Introduces students to the study of crime and deviance with a specific emphasis on immigrant populations and/or Latino communities in the United States. Offers students an opportunity to develop an understanding of the historical relationship between patterns of immigration and patterns of crime, to examine the nature and extent of contemporary immigrant crime and victimization, and to assess the social and health consequences associated with crime among Latino and immigrant populations and within immigrant communities.

CRIM 7266. Crimes Against Humanity. 3 Hours.

Examines crimes against humanity with a specific focus on the role that criminology might play in helping us to understand the causes and consequences. Offers students an opportunity to critically assess the ways in which contemporary criminological theories fail to explain or address the most odious of all crimes—genocide, war crimes, and other crimes against humanity. Introduces students to the development of international criminal law and international criminal tribunals. Examines the International Criminal Court and its role in prosecuting perpetrators and holding individuals and heads of state accountable.

CRIM 7268. Human Trafficking. 3 Hours.

Provides an overview of the phenomenon of human trafficking as defined in the U.N. Protocol and the U.S. Victims of Trafficking Violence Prevention Act. Emphasizes understanding the experiences and needs of trafficking victims and the methods of operations of traffickers and their networks. Examines various forms of human trafficking victimization, including sex trafficking, forced labor, bonded labor, domestic servitude, and chattel slavery in both the United States and international contexts. Explores the roles of the state, media, culture, and criminal networks in both creating the conditions under which human trafficking exist and eradicating the problem of trafficking.

CRIM 7270. Crime and Community Context. 3 Hours.

Provides an overview of crime in the context of communities. Covers major theoretical perspectives and introduces students to both major quantitative and ethnographic work on communities. Examines sociological aspects of community context and contrasts aspects of community processes that are implicated in either the generation or the prevention of crime. Considers current criminal justice practices and crime prevention approaches intended to address crime within communities—especially as they interact with neighborhood social processes in ways that deter or facilitate community crime.

CRIM 7308. Seminar in Policing. 3 Hours.

Examines the police function from a multitude of perspectives. Moves beyond analysis of the institution of the public police to explore the broader meaning and role of policing in modern societies. Emphasizes changes in the organization, structure, strategies, and control of policing. Students are expected to critically analyze existing empirical research that sheds light on the effectiveness of the police.

CRIM 7312. Special Topics in Criminology and Public Policy. 3 Hours.

Focuses on a particular aspect of criminology and/or public policy of contemporary interest. This course rotates annually. May be repeated without limit.

CRIM 7314. Special Topics in Law and Justice. 3 Hours.

Focuses on a particular aspect of law and justice of contemporary interest. This course rotates annually. May be repeated without limit.

CRIM 7316. Advanced Topics in Methods. 3 Hours.

Focuses on particular application methods not covered extensively in other research methods courses. This course rotates annually. May be repeated without limit.

CRIM 7317. Qualitative Methods. 3 Hours.

Introduces the principles and use of common qualitative methods in social science research with a particular focus on their application in the field of criminology and criminal justice. Offers students an opportunity to engage in primary data collection and to learn how to use a variety of analytic techniques including transcription, field note preparation, memos, development of coding schemes and conceptual frameworks, and data-verifying techniques.

CRIM 7325. Advanced Seminar in Policing. 3 Hours.

Exposes students to the most contemporary research on policing both nationally and internationally. Explores in-depth current issues facing policing, which may include community policing, the role of police in antiterrorism efforts, the role of technology in policing, policing diverse communities, and public-private policing partnerships. May be repeated without limit.

CRIM 7330. Punishment and Social Control. 3 Hours.

Opens with the philosophy of punishment. Discusses at length the purpose of punishment and the most common justifications for sanctioning, or imposing harm, on other citizens. Reviews the history of punishment and social control, with a particular focus on the birth and development of the prison. Although the focus is on the United States, the U.S. experience is contrasted with the European experience. The middle of the course is devoted to punishment and social theory (Foucault, Marx, Weber, Elias, Garland, etc.). The latter portion of the course focuses on contemporary issues in punishment and social control (e.g., the increased use of surveillance, the death penalty, the problem of mass incarceration, and the related problem of prisoner reentry).

CRIM 7332. International Law and Justice. 3 Hours.

Introduces students to the development of international criminal law and how the international community seeks justice. Focuses on misconduct that concerns more than one state and can only be prevented, suppressed, and sanctioned through international cooperation. Examines problems arising out of the existence of many legal systems and jurisdictions, conflicts of legal traditions, norms or interpretations of international rules. Covers sources of international criminal law, as well as types of international crime, such as aggression, war crimes, genocide, crimes against humanity, crimes against the environment, theft of cultural property, etc. Examines international cooperation issues (extradition, mutual legal assistance, return of corruption-derived assets); the role of Interpol and Europol, as well as other standard-setting organizations; the International Criminal Court; and ad hoc tribunals.

CRIM 7334. Transnational Crime. 3 Hours.

Offers a comprehensive review of issues relative to misconduct that affects at least two countries at once and to its control. While most criminal justice professionals focus on problems related to domestic and local criminality, another type of serious and harmful criminality occurs at the transnational level. “International crimes” are violations of international laws, while the term “transnational crime” refers to violations of the laws of more than one country. This course covers the second types of law violations and seeks to familiarize students with the distinct types of causation, victimization, and control problems faced in the global age as nation-states become increasingly interdependent. This course brings together analyses from several disciplines, such as law, political science, economics, sociology, and history.

CRIM 7336. Globalization of Crime and Justice. 3 Hours.

Examines how globalization and internationalization affect crime and crime control in the United States (e.g., human trafficking) and the emerging field of “global criminology”, including the analysis of international and regional trends and differences in law, crime, and justice. Because of the globalization of economic markets, knowledge, information, and transportation, crime and crime control are changing in extent and nature. Global developments often directly affect and shape local crime problems and crime policies (“glocalization”).

CRIM 7338. Special Topics in Globalization and International Crime. 3 Hours.

Focuses on a particular aspect of globalization and international crime of contemporary interest. This course rotates biannually. May be repeated without limit.

CRIM 7340. Special Topics in Criminal Justice Organizations and Leadership. 3 Hours.

Focuses on a particular aspect of criminal justice organizations of contemporary interest. This course rotates biannually. May be repeated without limit.

CRIM 7400. Graduate Criminal Justice Capstone. 3 Hours.

Seeks to help students integrate knowledge of criminological theory and justice policy with the research skills gained while working toward completion of the graduate degree. Offers students an opportunity to demonstrate their mastery of knowledge in the field of criminology and criminal justice and synthesize this knowledge with practical skills. Successful completion of this course requires submission of a comprehensive research paper on a specific subject, as agreed upon by the instructor.

CRIM 7404. Research Methods and Statistics. 3 Hours.

Offers an integrated introduction to research methods and statistics in the social and behavioral sciences. Illustrates how the basic methods of research design, measurement, and data collection bear directly on how those data can be analyzed empirically. Offers students an opportunity to develop a methodological and statistical toolbox that can be used to read, understand, carry out, and critically analyze scientific research.

CRIM 7500. Internship 1. 3 Hours.

Offers field placement in a criminal justice agency involving administrative, research, teaching, and related activities. Provides students with the opportunity to apply theoretical concepts in a practical, applied fashion by observing and contributing to the daily activities of operating agencies and organizations. All students work on at least one specific project at their field placement, and the results of this project are submitted to the graduate director.

CRIM 7502. Internship 2. 3 Hours.

Offers field placement in a criminal justice agency involving administrative, research, teaching, and related activities. Provides students with the opportunity to apply theoretical concepts in a practical, applied fashion by observing and contributing to the daily activities of operating agencies and organizations. All students work on at least one specific project at their field placement, and the results of this project are submitted to the graduate director.

CRIM 7700. Practicum in Teaching. 0 Hours.

Provides weekly meetings for graduate student lecturers and faculty advisers to discuss common concerns and issues arising during the course of teaching. With input from the Center for Effective University Teaching, covers topics such as syllabus preparation, examination preparation and grading, classroom protocol, and student interaction. Required for all doctoral students teaching a class for the first time.

CRIM 7702. Practicum in Policy Analysis. 1 Hour.

Offers graduate students the opportunity to work with an outside agency and meet weekly with a faculty adviser to discuss common concerns, problems, and ideas related to policy analysis.

CRIM 7704. Practicum in Research. 1 Hour.

Provides weekly meetings for graduate students and faculty advisers to discuss common concerns, problems, and ideas related to launching their dissertation research projects. Discusses such topics as data access and quality, measurement, and research ethics.

CRIM 7706. Practicum in Writing and Publishing. 2 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to develop and improve their academic writing skills while preparing a sole-authored article for potential publication. Requires each student to present a paper in-progress and, through an iterative process of review and revision, have it ready to submit to a journal by the end of the semester. Students comment, orally and in writing, on the papers presented by the other students over the course of the semester. There are regular assignments from leading texts on mechanics and style in writing and reflections on the peer-review and publication processes from multiple perspectives. May be repeated once.

CRIM 7710. Criminology and Public Policy 1. 3 Hours.

Provides detailed coverage of theoretical criminology and its implications for public policy. Approaches the understanding of crime from an interdisciplinary perspective, with special attention given to recent theoretical developments. Emphasizes evaluating theory in light of empirical research, understanding the implications of theory and research for programs and policies of crime prevention and control, and evaluating current approaches to crime prevention and control.

CRIM 7711. Criminology and Public Policy 2. 3 Hours.

Continues CRIM 7710. Provides detailed coverage of theoretical criminology and its implications for public policy. Approaches the understanding of crime from an interdisciplinary perspective, with special attention given to recent theoretical developments. Emphasizes evaluating theory in light of empirical research, understanding the implications of theory and research for programs and policies of crime prevention and control, and evaluating current approaches to crime prevention and control.

CRIM 7713. Advanced Research and Evaluation Methods. 3 Hours.

Deals in detail with all aspects of evaluation research. Includes both process and outcomes evaluation models and a discussion of experimental and quasi-experimental designs. Students review both qualitative and quantitative approaches to evaluation design and discuss financial issues in program evaluation. Exposes students to methods to develop an evaluation research proposal.

CRIM 7715. Multivariate Analysis 1. 3 Hours.

Builds upon the concepts of correlation and inference to present analytic procedures involving several variables, including multiple regression, logistic regression, causal analysis, and multiway ANOVA. Emphasizes the application of these methods with criminal justice data sets using statistical software programs.

CRIM 7716. Multivariate Analysis 2. 3 Hours.

Continues CRIM 7715. Covers more advanced multivariate analytic methods. Topics include principal components and factor analysis, discriminant analysis, MANOVA, time series, and cluster analysis. Emphasizes the application of these methods with criminal justice data sets using statistical software programs.

CRIM 7718. Advanced Data Analysis. 3 Hours.

Designed to build upon the foundations provided by CRIM 7715 and CRIM 7716 with the goal of students becoming proficient with selected quantitative multivariate analysis techniques. Topics covered in this course include various general linear models, hierarchical linear models, and survival analysis. Requires substantial computer use as particular emphasis is placed on analyzing data using a variety of statistical programs. This is a PhD-level course.

CRIM 7720. Crime Mapping. 3 Hours.

Studies the process of mapping. Employs a holistic approach to learning how to create and interpret maps, which seeks to provide a much deeper understanding of crime mapping and leave students with a solid foundation of skills that are transferable and scalable. Although this course represents an introduction to crime mapping, the goal is that students completing the course are successful in future mapping endeavors. Focuses on how to create effective maps (start to finish) rather than focusing largely on the various mapping capabilities currently available to researchers.

CRIM 7962. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions. May be repeated without limit.

CRIM 7976. Directed Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers the student the opportunity to bring individual, concentrated attention to a particular topic as arranged and agreed upon in advance by a faculty member and the student. This option is generally recommended when the student desires a more intensive analysis of a particular subject. May be repeated without limit.

CRIM 7978. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers independent work under the direction of members of the department on a chosen topic. Course content depends on instructor. May be repeated without limit.

CRIM 7990. Thesis. 6 Hours.

Offers students electing to write a master’s thesis the opportunity to select a thesis topic with the advice of a faculty member and receive approval of the thesis topic from the graduate director. May be repeated without limit.

CRIM 7996. Thesis Continuation. 0 Hours.

Continues thesis work conducted under the supervision of a departmental faculty.

CRIM 8960. Exam Preparation—Doctoral. 0 Hours.

Offers the student the opportunity to prepare, under faculty supervision, for the PhD qualifying examination.

CRIM 8964. Co-op Work Experience. 0 Hours.

Provides eligible students with an opportunity for work experience. May be repeated without limit.

CRIM 8966. Practicum. 1-4 Hours.

Provides eligible students with an opportunity for practical experience. May be repeated without limit.

CRIM 8982. Readings. 1-4 Hours.

Offers selected readings under the supervision of a faculty member. May be repeated without limit.

CRIM 8984. Research. 1-4 Hours.

Offers an opportunity to conduct research under faculty supervision. May be repeated without limit.

CRIM 8986. Research. 0 Hours.

Offers an opportunity to conduct full-time research under faculty supervision. May be repeated without limit.

CRIM 9000. PhD Candidacy Achieved. 0 Hours.

Indicates successful completion of the doctoral comprehensive exam.

CRIM 9984. Research. 1-4 Hours.

Offers an opportunity to conduct research under faculty supervision. May be repeated without limit.

CRIM 9986. Research. 0 Hours.

Offers an opportunity to conduct full-time research under faculty supervision. May be repeated without limit.

CRIM 9990. Dissertation. 0 Hours.

Provides the student with the opportunity, under close faculty guidance, to conduct an original investigation of a criminal justice issue. Each student identifies a faculty chair and two additional faculty members who comprise the student’s Dissertation Committee. While the student conducts research and develops a dissertation, the committee provides support and direction and, ultimately, approves the final research product. May be repeated without limit.

CRIM 9996. Dissertation Continuation. 0 Hours.

Offers continued thesis work conducted under the supervision of a departmental faculty. May be repeated without limit.