Physical Therapy, Movement, and Rehabilitation Sciences

Website

Kristin Curry Greenwood, PT, DPT, EdD, MS
Clinical Professor and Chair

Eric Folmar, PT, DPT, OCS
Associate Clinical Professor and Associate Chair

301 Robinson Hall
617.373.3908
617.373.3161 (fax)
physicaltherapy@northeastern.edu

The cornerstone of the Department of Physical Therapy, Movement, and Rehabilitation Sciences is experiential learning aligned with the mission of Bouvé College and Health Sciences and Northeastern University’s 2025 Academic Plan. The programs within the department enhance and extend students’ learning of human movement and rehabilitation through experiential education, interdisciplinary collaborations, interprofessional education, research opportunities, and a variety of global educational experiences. The department is led by a collaborative interdisciplinary body of faculty with research, scholarship, clinical, and teaching expertise across a diverse spectrum. 

The Department of Physical Therapy, Movement, and Rehabilitation Sciences' research mission is to build the evidence for best practices to maintain and improve the health and well-being of local, national, and global community members. Students have the opportunity to work with faculty to conduct ongoing research in one of the nine Department of Physical Therapy, Movement, and Rehabilitation Sciences' labs and centers, including Neuromotor Systems Laboratory, Laboratory for Locomotion Research, ReGameVR Laboratory, Movement Neuroscience Laboratory, Musculoskeletal Epidemiology and Biomechanics Laboratory, Neuroscience Wet Lab, Occupational Biomechanics Laboratory, Teaching and Learning Innovation Lab, and the Center for Cognitive and Brain Health Program.

The Department of Physical Therapy, Movement, and Rehabilitation Sciences graduates are innovative global leaders who excel in clinical practice, research, worker wellness, ergonomics, human movement, and community service.

PT 1000. College: An Introduction. 1 Hour.

Provides an introduction to the University, college, and health professions to enhance students’ understanding of self and the decisions they make academically and socially as members of the University’s diverse, multicultural community. Group activities and individual assignments along with active participation in a learning community help students adjust to life on an urban campus, develop a better understanding of the learning process, acquire essential academic skills, and make connections with the faculty and students in the college.

PT 1880. Introduction to Sports Medicine. 4 Hours.

Offers an introductory course intended for students interested in sports, coaching, medicine, and exercise. Exposes students to the field of sports medicine. Emphasizes orthopedic anatomy, exercise principles, and a basic introduction to prevention of injury and illness related to athletes. Includes a cadaveric lab and lectures.

PT 1990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions. May be repeated without limit.

PT 2000. Professional Development Co-op. 1 Hour.

Introduces the Bouvé Cooperative Education Program. Offers students an opportunity to develop job-search and career-management skills. Students perform assessments of their workplace skills, interests, and values and discuss how they impact personal career decisions. Offers students an opportunity to prepare a professional-style résumé, learn proper interviewing techniques, and gain an understanding of the opportunities available to them for co-op. Introduces career paths, choices, and career decision making. Familiarizes students with workplace issues relative to their field of study and presents the MyNEU COOL database in the job-search and referral process. Presents and discusses co-op policies, procedures, and expectations of the Bouvé Cooperative Education Program and co-op employers.

PT 2990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions. May be repeated without limit.

PT 2991. Research in Physical Therapy. 1-4 Hours.

Offers an opportunity to conduct introductory-level research or creative endeavors under faculty supervision.

PT 3400. Human Kinesiology. 4 Hours.

Studies normal movement through the analysis of muscle and joint function. Introduces fundamental examples of pathokinesiology, aberrant motions, and gait and posture. Emphasizes the analysis of the major joints and regions of the body.

PT 3500. Motor Control of Human Movement. 4 Hours.

Covers two broad areas that impact the human movement system: motor control and motor learning. Examines neural, behavioral, and physical mechanisms that contribute to the control of movement in humans. Focuses on motor control in healthy persons, with some discussion of alterations associated with musculoskeletal and neural impairment. Examines factors that influence the learning of new motor skills (motor learning) as a result of practice and/or experience.

PT 3555. Human Pathology and the Influence on Movement. 4 Hours.

Covers foundational knowledge of pathological processes and how they affect major body systems. Discusses general medicine, laboratory medicine, pathophysiology, and prevention for basic disease categories, and explores the subsequent impact on movement and function. Examines select pathologies from multiple disease categories and discusses the impact on structure, function, and movement, as well as the interrelationship with other systems of the body.

PT 3990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions. May be repeated without limit.

PT 4990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions. May be repeated without limit.

PT 4992. Directed Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers independent work under the direction of members of the department on a chosen topic. Course content depends on instructor. May be repeated without limit.

PT 4996. Experiential Education Directed Study. 1-4 Hours.

Draws upon the student’s approved experiential activity and integrates it with study in the academic major. Restricted to those students who are using it to fulfill their experiential education requirement. May be repeated without limit.

PT 5010. Human Gross Anatomy. 4 Hours.

Covers the structure and function of the human body with emphasis on the skeletal, muscular, digestive, cardiopulmonary, and peripheral nervous systems. Uses a regional and systemic approach to explore the details of the limbs, thorax, abdomen, and pelvic regions of the body. Considers clinical application of these systems' basic abnormalities of structure and function. Corequisite labs provide hands-on exploration of the human body utilizing cadaveric specimens.

PT 5011. Lab for PT 5010. 1 Hour.

Covers the structure and function of the appendicular and axial skeletal systems of the body through prosected human cadavers and osteology. Emphasizes the skeletal, muscular, digestive, cardiopulmonary and peripheral nervous systems.

PT 5101. Foundations of Physical Therapy. 3 Hours.

Designed to provide a basic practical understanding of patient care procedures used in physical therapy practice. Covers body mechanics, therapeutic positioning, patient ambulation, transfer techniques, soft tissue mobilization, and documentation. Offers the learner an opportunity to obtain the information needed to use therapeutic modalities in a variety of clinical settings. Introduces physical therapy students to professional behaviors.

PT 5102. Lab for PT 5101. 1 Hour.

Accompanies PT 5101. Covers topics from the course through various experiments.

PT 5111. Professional Development for Bouvé Graduate Co-op. 1 Hour.

Introduces graduate students to the Bouvé Cooperative Education Program and offers an opportunity to develop job-search and career-management skills. Students perform assessments of their workplace skills, interests, and values and discuss how they impact personal career decisions. Offers students an opportunity to prepare a professional-style résumé, learn proper interviewing techniques, and gain an understanding of the opportunities available to them for co-op. Introduces career paths, choices, and career decision making. Seeks to familiarize students with workplace issues relative to their field of study and to teach them to use myNEU COOL database in the job-search and referral process. Presents and discusses co-op policies, procedures, and expectations of the Bouvé Cooperative Education Program and co-op employers.

PT 5131. Gross Anatomy. 4 Hours.

Covers the structure and function of the human body with particular emphasis on the skeletal, muscular, nervous, and cardiovascular systems and clinical application to these systems. Considers basic abnormalities of structure and function. Involves lectures, cadaver prosection, osteology, and surface anatomy labs.

PT 5132. Lab for PT 5131. 1 Hour.

Accompanies PT 5131. Covers topics from the course through various activities.

PT 5133. Kinesiology. 3 Hours.

Studies normal movement through the analysis of muscle and joint function. Introduces fundamental examples of pathokinesiology, aberrant motions, and postures. Emphasizes analysis of the major joints and regions of the body as related to the field of physical therapy, including aspects of gait analysis. Encourages critical thinking and integrates material learned in prior course work, including, but not limited to, anatomy and physiology.

PT 5134. Lab for PT 5133. 1 Hour.

Offers students an opportunity to measure skills of goniometry and manual muscle testing to assess joint mobility and muscle performance. Also covers assessment of posture and gait. Integrated with PT 5133 and builds upon the foundation of gross anatomy.

PT 5138. Neuroscience. 4 Hours.

Covers the structure and physiological function of the human nervous system with emphasis on the clinical aspects of motor and somatosensory systems. Studies the anatomy of the brain, brain stem, and spinal cord in specimens and on slides and integrated with the basic physiology of motor and sensory systems. The application of neuroscience to clinical neurological cases is a foundation of this course.

PT 5139. Lab for PT 5138. 1 Hour.

Accompanies PT 5138. Covers topics from the course through various experiments.

PT 5140. Pathology. 4 Hours.

Covers foundational knowledge of pathological processes of major body systems. Addresses general medicine, laboratory medicine, and pathophysiology as related to patient conditions that impact physical therapy management. Case-based discussion allows for integration of pathology and pharmacology content.

PT 5145. Introduction to the Healthcare System. 2 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to obtain the foundation to understand and appreciate the framework of the U.S. healthcare system. Compares other selected global healthcare systems. Examines historical events, policy changes, and current issues that impact the delivery of healthcare services.

PT 5150. Motor Control, Development, and Learning. 4 Hours.

Covers three broad areas—motor control, motor development, and motor learning. Examines neural, behavioral, and physical mechanisms that contribute to the control of movement in humans. Focuses on motor control in healthy persons, with some discussion of alterations associated with musculoskeletal and neural impairment. Addresses motor development and maturation from intrauterine life through old age (senescence). Considers the interaction of body-system development and growth on acquisition of and changes in typical skill development. Examines factors that influence the learning of new motor skills (motor learning) as a result of practice.

PT 5151. Lab for PT 5150. 1 Hour.

Offers students an opportunity to apply knowledge gained in PT 5150 to activities designed to illustrate various principles and concepts related to motor control, motor development, and motor learning. Uses a series of guiding questions/activities in each laboratory and analyzes associated literature to offer students an opportunity to apply class concepts to healthy individuals and to those with clinical problems related to motor control, motor development, or motor learning.

PT 5160. Psychosocial Aspects of Healthcare. 3 Hours.

Examines interpersonal relationships among patients, families, health professionals, and society, with reference to the impact of and reaction to illness and disability. Identifies personal and societal beliefs, values, and attitudes that affect the role of people with illness or disabilities in our culture and the healthcare system; how patients’ beliefs, values, and experiences affect their expectations and interactions with healthcare professionals; and how beliefs, values, and experiences shape professional development and affect relationships with patients.

PT 5161. Psychosocial Aspects of Healthcare Seminar. 1 Hour.

Offers students an opportunity to engage in hands-on service roles and address the needs/interests of community partners. Students also have an opportunity to reflect on their learning through service during on-campus and online activities/assignments.

PT 5165. Sports Medicine: Managing the Injured Athlete. 4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to obtain in-depth knowledge in sports medicine. Covers taping and bracing procedures and techniques to assess concussions with various current protocols. Exposes students to current common pathologies within the athletic population. Discusses return-to-play criteria for an athlete once an injury has occurred and has subsequently been treated and rehabilitated.

PT 5209. Neurological Rehabilitation 1. 4 Hours.

Covers the foundations of the physical therapy examination, evaluation, and intervention for persons with neurological deficits. Presents examination skills, theoretical bases, and clinical applications of integrated intervention approaches for the patient with a neurological diagnosis. Includes the etiology, pathology, medical management, and physical therapy management of common neurology disorders affecting the adult population. Accompanied by PT 5210.

PT 5210. Lab for PT 5209. 1 Hour.

Accompanies PT 5209. Covers the foundations of the physical therapy examination, evaluation, and intervention with patients with neurological deficits. Presents clinical procedures for examination skills, evaluation, and clinical applications of integrated intervention approaches for the patient with a neurological diagnosis.

PT 5226. Physical Therapy Professional Seminar 2. 2 Hours.

Continues PT 5135 and builds on concepts introduced in the earlier course. Affords students the opportunity to reflect on issues in experiential education and prepare for future experiential learning.

PT 5227. Physical Therapy Project 1. 3 Hours.

Provides students with the opportunity to conduct an independent project under the mentorship of physical therapy faculty in areas such as research, education, clinical practice, administration, or service learning.

PT 5229. Physical Therapy Project 2. 2 Hours.

Provides students with a continued opportunity to work with individual faculty on scholarship activities to create a scholarly work in partial fulfillment of the requirement for a Doctor of Physical Therapy degree. Allows students to continue the research or education project that was initiated in PT 5227. Guides students as necessary to enable them to complete their capstone project.

PT 5230. Pediatric and Geriatric Aspects of Life Span Management. 3 Hours.

Incorporates analysis and comparison of methods of physical therapy (PT) management of selected populations across the life span, which includes pediatrics and geriatrics. Focuses on utilizing evidenced-based rationale for clinical decision making within the context of PT examination, evaluation, PT diagnosis, prognosis, and plan of care. Discusses how patient/client management seeks to reflect core professional values, as well as topics of prevention and wellness in these patient populations.

PT 5410. Functional Human Neuroanatomy. 4 Hours.

Examines the detailed structure of the human nervous system, linking structure to function at both the clinical and neurobiological level. Offers students an opportunity to obtain a solid functional anatomical foundation for neuroscience. Reviews basic neuroanatomy and then provides a detailed look into the structure of the nuclei within the central nervous system and their connectivity. Examines the role of these structures in motor and sensory function as well as in complex cognitive functions at a physiological and clinical level.

PT 5411. Lab for PT 5410. 1 Hour.

Examines the detailed structure of the human nervous system in specimens of the human brain and spinal cord as well as in images of stained sections of these tissues and magnetic resonance images (MRI). The structure of individual nuclei and the main sensory and motor tracts of the nervous system are examined and discussed by students working in small groups. Although focusing on anatomical details, the lab introduces the student to clinical diagnosis of neurological cases.

PT 5450. Introduction to Therapeutic Activities. 2 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity for exposure to the biologic underpinnings of therapeutic activities, as well as to increase their skill in the application of such activities, including exercise prescription, therapeutic handling skills, and functional activity design. Skills taught in this course shape interventions used in the physical therapy treatment of people across the life span with a variety of impairments of body structure, function, and functional activity limitations.

PT 5500. Pharmacology for Physical Therapy. 2 Hours.

Offers a clinically oriented course covering knowledge of clinical pharmacology in the physical therapy profession. Discusses prescription and over-the-counter drugs and common herbal supplements. Drug classification, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, mechanism of action, drug interactions, and common side effects are brought into the clinical perspective of patient management. Explores recognition of expected drug effects, side effects, idiosyncratic reactions, and signs of abuse or nonadherence. Along with PT 5140, emphasizes the therapist’s proper incorporation of pharmacotherapeutic knowledge into patient assessment, differential diagnosis, and design of treatment regimens.

PT 5503. Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Management. 4 Hours.

Discusses physical therapy examination evaluation, interventions, and outcome assessment of common cardiac and pulmonary dysfunctions. Discusses etiology and pathology of common cardiac and pulmonary disorders. Uses case-based learning to promote synthesis of the material.

PT 5504. Lab for PT 5503. 1 Hour.

Accompanies PT 5503. Covers topics from the course through various experiments.

PT 5505. Musculoskeletal Management 1. 4 Hours.

Discusses physical therapy examination evaluation, interventions, and outcome assessment of common musculoskeletal dysfunctions. Uses case-based learning to promote synthesis of the material.

PT 5506. Lab for PT 5505. 1 Hour.

Accompanies PT 5505. Covers topics from the course through various experiments.

PT 5515. Integumentary Systems. 2 Hours.

Applies anatomy, physiology, epidemiology, and pathology to explore the issues of medical, surgical, pharmacological, and psychological and physical therapy management of individuals throughout the life span with integumentary system impairments. Offers learners an opportunity to develop examination skills to derive diagnoses, prognoses, evaluations, and effective physical therapy interventions based on relevant evidence. Includes modalities for wound care and electrophysiological testing and interpretation. Uses case studies to integrate and apply the information obtained through readings, lectures, and lab.

PT 5516. Lab for PT 5515. 1 Hour.

Accompanies PT 5515. Covers topics from the course through various experiments.

PT 5540. Clinical Integration 1: Evidence and Practice. 2 Hours.

Designed to prepare physical therapy students to integrate previous courses taught in the curriculum to safely manage patients in the acute-care setting, including the intensive-care unit, the critical-care unit, and step-down settings. Uses a combination of lecture, instruction in the simulation center, and standardized patient interactions. Follows the “Guide to Physical Therapy Practice for Evaluation and Intervention” in these settings. Offers students an opportunity to learn to perform an examination; to evaluate examination data to formulate a plan of care; to provide interventions; to determine a discharge plan for individuals in the acute-care environment; and to demonstrate core professional values in classroom, recitation, and standardized patient interactions.

PT 5600. Ergonomics and the Work Environment. 3 Hours.

Builds upon the public health definition that ergonomics is the applied science that optimizes overall human-systems performance and well-being within the work environment. Emphasizes a public health approach suited for healthcare professionals building on their strengths and training in analytical diagnostic skills and interventions, ranging from primary to tertiary approaches. Covers topics including epidemiology, job hazard analysis, and intervention methods and research. Offers students an opportunity to obtain the knowledge and skills to improve the physical ergonomic factors in a workplace in order to increase the health and well-being of workers.

PT 5601. Project for PT 5600. 1 Hour.

Focuses on a project to accompany PT 5600.

PT 5610. Workplace Wellness and Health Promotion. 3 Hours.

Focuses on the skills needed to create, implement, and evaluate workplace health promotion and injury prevention programs. Studies the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health’s (NIOSH) essential elements of workplace health programs, utilizing and reviewing the literature in support of these essential elements throughout the semester. Workplace factors have strong associations with the health and health behaviors of workers. Builds upon basic wellness and organizational ergonomic principles to offer students an opportunity to develop the skills needed and to obtain the knowledge of the work environment and health promotion.

PT 5611. Project for PT 5610. 1 Hour.

Builds on PT 5610. Focuses on understanding the development of workplace health promotion and injury prevention programs and delves deeper into material covered in PT 5610 with additional readings and a final project.

PT 5710. Psychosocial Aspects of Disability. 4 Hours.

Explores the psychological, social, and cultural factors that underlie responses and adaptations to chronic illness and disability by individuals and families. Offers a foundation for nonjudgmentally ascertaining and supporting clients’ needs. Includes coping needs and strategies that are used by those without complicating factors, as well as those that may be used by individuals who have comorbid conditions such as psychiatric disorders; substance abuse; or cultural, gender, or age differences. Presents best practices on interviewing skills, assessment, and interventions to support the needs of people affected by chronic illness or disability.

PT 5976. Directed Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers independent work under the direction of members of the department on a chosen topic. Course content depends on instructor. May be repeated without limit.