School of Pharmacy

Website

David P. Zgarrick, PhD, FAPhA, RPh
Professor and Acting Dean

Jenny A. Van Amburgh, PharmD, RPh, FAPhA, FNAP, BCACP, CDE
Clinical Professor and Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs

Diomedes Logothesis, PhD
Professor and Chair, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences

Michael J. Gonyeau, PharmD, RPh, MEd, FCCP, FNAP, BCPS
Clinical Professor and Interim Chair, Department of Pharmacy and Health Systems Sciences

140 The Fenway
617.373.3380
617.373.7655 (fax)
schoolofpharmacy@northeastern.edu

The School of Pharmacy (SOP) is dedicated to excellence in pharmacy-related education, research, and service, including the provision of patient care. We seek to prepare students with knowledge, skills, and values for careers in pharmacy practice and the pharmaceutical sciences. Our programs promote intellectual growth, professionalism, and lifelong learning. Through the generation and dissemination of new knowledge and through scholarship and community service, the school contributes to improved individual and population health.

The six-year (two years of preprofessional and four years of professional courses) program at Northeastern University leading to the professional Doctor of Pharmacy degree (PharmD) offers a unique program that fully integrates campus-based learning with experiential learning, including the university’s signature cooperative education (co-op) program, to provide students with the skills and abilities necessary to succeed in the pharmacy profession. Our students promote and ensure the safe and effective use of drugs and provide medication therapy management services. In addition to preparing and dispensing prescribed medications, our students provide information to patients about medications and their uses; advise physicians, other prescribers, and other healthcare practitioners on medication selection, dosages, interactions, and adverse effects; and monitor patient responses to drug therapy.

Our students are well equipped to provide patient care services in a variety of settings. Most of our graduates work in community pharmacies or in healthcare facilities such as hospitals and ambulatory clinics. Additional practice opportunities exist in health maintenance organizations, private practice groups, long-term-care facilities, home healthcare, the Public Health Service, the armed services, and law enforcement agencies such as the Federal Drug Enforcement Administration. Graduates may also find employment in drug development, marketing and research within the pharmaceutical industry, colleges of pharmacy, and professional association management. In addition, many of our graduates go on to pharmacy practice residencies, fellowships, and leading graduate programs.

Pharmacy students are admitted with the expectation that by working with faculty, staff, and each other, they will develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for academic and professional success. Students follow academic progression plans for their respective years of graduation. Any deviation from the prescribed curriculum will require faculty/staff permission and an approved plan of study from the SOP Academic Affairs Committee.

The pharmacy curriculum includes introductory (cooperative education) and advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs). These pharmacy practice experiences are provided primarily under the direct supervision of qualified pharmacist preceptors and occasionally with other qualified healthcare professionals. The school is affiliated with many world-class practice sites throughout the United States, providing students with access to experienced clinicians and scholars. Although every effort is made to accommodate individual circumstances and requests, students should be prepared to travel outside the Boston area to complete some of their pharmacy practice experiences. Availability of a car may be required, as some sites are not accessible by public transportation. All expenses associated with pharmacy practice experiences, including travel and housing, are the responsibility of the student.

Introductory pharmacy practice experiences (IPPEs) are competitive placements that are based on job availability in a geographic region. The placements are facilitated by SOP cooperative education coordinators. Students are required to complete one IPPE in a community setting and one IPPE in an institutional/hospital practice setting.

APPE placements are provided based on site/preceptor availability and the final approval of the SOP Office of Experiential Education (OEE). Students may be able to petition the OEE for out-of-system APPEs; however, availability for such requests is limited.

To be eligible for a Doctor of Pharmacy degree (PharmD), a student must successfully complete all courses in the curriculum including the introductory (co-op) and APPEs; meet the academic progression standards of the program; meet the technical standards of the program; and satisfy all other requirements as stated in the Bouvé College of Health Sciences Undergraduate Student Information Manual. The pharmacy program, which is fully accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE), subscribes to the standards established by ACPE and the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy.

Students enrolled in the PharmD program will be awarded a Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy Studies after successful completion of all didactic and laboratory courses in semesters 1 through 10 of the pharmacy curriculum with an overall grade-point average (GPA) of 2.000 or greater. The Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy Studies does not allow for individuals to pursue licensure for direct patient care in the practice of pharmacy. To earn the PharmD degree, students must complete an additional 36 semester hours of APPEs (see “Requirements for the Doctor of Pharmacy Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences” below) with an overall GPA of 3.000 or greater in the Bouvé College of Health Sciences graduate program.

Pharmacy graduates must meet specific requirements to qualify for professional licensure in the state where they plan to practice as a registered pharmacist. These requirements include graduating from an accredited school of pharmacy, passing national and state board examinations, and completing internship hours. The internship is a period of practical experience conducted under the supervision of a registered pharmacist. Massachusetts requires 1,740 internship hours, all of which are satisfied through the introductory (co-op) and APPEs.

The SOP offers a four-year degree program leading to the Bachelor of Science in Pharmaceutical Sciences (BSPS). The program is designed to prepare students for careers in entry-level positions in the pharmaceutical, biomedical, biotechnology, drug discovery, and development industries or to prepare graduates for admission into advanced degree (MS, PhD) programs in the pharmaceutical sciences. The BSPS does not qualify or prepare graduates to apply for licensure for the practice of pharmacy. This program will be open primarily to students already enrolled at Northeastern University who choose a future career that is grounded in the pharmaceutical sciences. Courses for the BSPS curriculum parallel the PharmD curriculum so credits are readily transferable. The BSPS degree requires a minimum of four years of study and provides for at least one co-op period. The total number of semester hours (134–143) meets the university minimum of 128 semester hours for a BS degree.

Requirements for the Doctor of Pharmacy Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences 

Requirements for eligibility to enter the PharmD APPEs include:

  1. Successful completion of all required and elective didactic course work in the pharmacy curriculum and conferral of the Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy Studies degree.
  2. Successful completion of the APPE preparatory courses (Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience Preparatory Seminar 1 (PHMD 5438) and Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience Preparatory Seminar 2 (PHMD 5439)).
  3. Evidence of health clearance from University Health and Counseling Services before placements at any APPE site.
  4. Satisfactory completion of any additional site-specific requirements including, but not limited to, criminal record information (CORI) and verification of immunization status. All fees associated with these requirements are the responsibility of the student.
  5. Adherence to the SOP's code of professional conduct and university’s code of conduct policies while off-campus. 
  6. Successful completion of six, six-week APPEs: four required APPEs (i.e., ambulatory care, community, internal/general medicine, and one health system experience); and two electives that may be patient-care or non-patient-care focused.
  7. Maintenance of sufficient knowledge of site-specific requirements (via site descriptions) and completion of site requests within specified deadlines. Failure to complete these requirements as directed will likely result in delay of graduation.
  8. Maintenance of an APPE portfolio throughout the APPE year and completion of all portfolio submission requirements within specified deadlines.
  9. Attendance at scheduled on-campus APPE meetings during the APPE year:
    1. Fall semester: midpoint APPE meeting
    2. Spring semester: exit meeting

Technical Standards for the Doctor of Pharmacy Program

The PharmD program at Northeastern University is a rigorous and challenging academic program that requires students to possess specific characteristics and abilities within the cognitive, affective, and psychomotor domains, referred to here as technical standards. To successfully progress in and ultimately complete the didactic, laboratory, and experiential components of the PharmD program, students must meet the standards described below.

Intellectual Abilities

Students must have well-developed problem-solving and critical-thinking skills. Cognitive function must be appropriate to integrate, evaluate, and apply information gained through measurement, analysis, calculation, and reasoning. Students must have the capacity to learn efficiently in classroom, laboratory, small group and experiential settings, and through independent study. Students are required to demonstrate the ability to integrate course content knowledge with clinical practice applications to optimize medication therapy management.

Communication Skills

Students must be able to communicate effectively with colleagues, professors, patients, families, and healthcare providers. This includes efficiently comprehending, speaking, reading, and writing in English. Students must be able to process and use appropriate nonverbal cues and be proficient in the use of electronic communication media.

Behavioral and Social Attributes

Students must demonstrate maturity, integrity, honesty, compassion, and respect when relating to others. Students must have sufficient mental and emotional health to complete work and responsibilities using good judgment. Students must be able to tolerate and adapt to stressful workloads and situations and modify behavior based on constructive criticism. Students must be able to function in accordance with the legal and ethical standards of practice.

Observation and Motor Skills

Students must have functional use of visual, auditory, and tactile senses. Students must be able to observe and perform experiments, physical assessments, patient interviews, and medication order processing. Students must be able to distinguish physical characteristics of medications by inspection. Students must have coordination of gross and fine muscular movements sufficient to perform pharmacy-related tasks including compounding and dispensing medications, administering medications, and using computers and other technology necessary for learning and professional practice.

Bachelor of Science (BS)

Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD)

Pharmacy Practice Courses

PHMD 1000. College: An Introduction. 1 Hour.

Introduces the University, college, and health professions to enhance students’ understanding of self and the decisions they make academically and socially as members of the University’s diverse, multicultural community. Offers students an opportunity to engage in group activities and individual assignments along with active participation in a learning community to help them adjust to life on an urban campus, develop a better understanding of the learning process, acquire essential academic skills, and make connections with the faculty and students in the college. Prereq. Bouvé students with freshman standing only.

PHMD 1001. Introduction to the Profession of Pharmacy. 1 Hour.

Introduces the profession of pharmacy in this one-credit course. Covers pharmacists’ responsibilities, pharmacy organizations, ethical issues related to healthcare, and the education and training of pharmacists. Offers students the opportunity to learn about the role of the pharmacist within different healthcare systems. Guest speakers, from several areas of pharmacy practice, provide firsthand information on career options. Prereq. Pharmacy majors only.

PHMD 1201. Introduction to Pharmacy Practice. 2.5 Hours.

Seeks to prepare pharmacy students for their first introductory pharmacy practice experience (IPPE)/co-op. Introduces students to the policies, procedures, and expectations of the Cooperative Education Program. Offers students an opportunity to develop the skills needed to be successful in the preparation, activity, and reflection components of the pharmacy co-op program; to prepare their first résumés; and to learn proper interviewing techniques. Exposes students to the various co-op opportunities available to them as well as potential career paths within the pharmacy profession. Covers workplace issues including diversity, sexual harassment, ethics, and confidence of information. Introduces students to the technical knowledge and skills required for their first pharmacy experiences in both community and institutional pharmacy practice and to drug information resources. Offers students an opportunity to develop basic communication skills to aid them in successful completion of their first IPPE. Prereq. Sophomore standing or above; pharmacy and pharmacy studies majors only. Coreq. PHMD 1202.

PHMD 1202. Lab for PHMD 1201. 0.5 Hours.

Accompanies PHMD 1201. Focuses on skills needed for future patient-care experiences. Intended to supplement lecture content and provide practical reinforcement of concepts. Offers students an opportunity to apply knowledge learned in the classroom related to the appropriate and effective use of communication strategies, drug information resources, and sterile techniques. Labs related to the learning of communication skills support a client-centered approach in assessing, adapting, and evaluating patient medication use needs. Offers students an opportunity to learn and practice of six core communication skills: (1) listening, (2) asking questions, (3) providing empathy, (4) understanding and managing confusion, (5) understanding and managing conflict, and (6) understanding and analyzing nonverbal behavior. Coreq. PHMD 1201.

PHMD 1990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

PHMD 2000. Professional Development Co-op. 1 Hour.

Introduces the Bouvé Cooperative Education Program. Offers students an opportunity to develop job-search and career-management skills. Students perform assessments of their workplace skills, interests, and values and discuss how they impact personal career decisions. Offers students an opportunity to prepare a professional-style résumé, learn proper interviewing techniques, and gain an understanding of the opportunities available to them for co-op. Introduces career paths, choices, and career decision making. Familiarizes students with workplace issues relative to their field of study and presents the MyNEU COOL database in the job-search and referral process. Presents and discusses co-op policies, procedures, and expectations of the Bouvé Cooperative Education Program and co-op employers.

PHMD 2310. Educational and Behavioral Interventions in Pharmacy Practice. 2 Hours.

Seeks to provide pharmacy students with theoretical frameworks and principles for understanding communication processes and practical tools to engage in effective interpersonal communication when providing medication therapy management to diverse patient populations. Uses a patient-centered approach to assess, adapt, and evaluate various types of communications within a variety of pharmacy settings. Reviews core communication skills, including listening, asking questions, providing empathy, understanding/managing confusion, understanding/managing conflict, and understanding/analyzing nonverbal behavior. Additional skills covered include detecting/intervening to improve adherence, facilitating behavioral change, communicating with special populations, leading/facilitating group communication, collaborating with other professionals, analyzing organizational communication in pharmacies, and understanding/analyzing health promotion campaigns. Offers students an opportunity to become aware of communication issues facing pharmacy practice at interpersonal, interprofessional, and organizational levels. Coreq. PHMD 2311.

PHMD 2311. Lab for PHMD 2310. 0.5 Hours.

Offers a laboratory course designed to support a patient-centered approach to how pharmacy students assess, adapt, and evaluate various types of communications within pharmacy settings. Offers students an opportunity to apply course concepts in group discussions, interact with standardized patients, and complete various written and oral exercises. Seeks to provide students with practical tools to engage in effective interpersonal communication when providing medication therapy management to diverse patient populations. Also covers how to deliver a professional presentation of information to an audience. Coreq. PHMD 2310.

PHMD 2350. Healthcare Systems. 3 Hours.

Examines the evolution of the healthcare system in the United States, from the early forms of organized institutional care to the dynamic, increasingly integrated, and managed-care system of present healthcare delivery. Examines the interaction of regulatory, economic, political, social, and ethical aspects of the healthcare system, with emphasis on issues related to pharmacy practice. Current proposals for healthcare and drug-related reform and regulation are considered. Considers the impact and consequences of action in one era on the structure and function of healthcare in later years. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

PHMD 2990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

PHMD 3450. Research Methodology and Biostatistics. 3 Hours.

Offers an interactive course covering aspects of research designs used in experimental and observational studies, hypothesis testing, and an introduction to basic biostatistics. Offers students an opportunity to critically examine selected articles from the clinical literature and to analyze the framing of the research question and the methods used to insure the validity and generalizability of the study’s findings. Clinical trials, observational studies, and problem sets illustrate principles of research design, conduct, and data analysis. Prereq. ENGW 1111, ENGW 1102, ENGL 1111, ENGL 1102, or graduate standing; restricted to students with junior, senior, or graduate standing.

PHMD 3600. Leadership and Advocacy in Health Professions. 2 Hours.

Designed to help facilitate successful careers of young healthcare professionals and expand students’ knowledge of their leadership potential. Consists primarily of topic discussions that include a variety of issues related to professional development, focusing on leadership, organizational and relational skills, and advocacy. Covers global issues in leadership and advocacy. Encourages students to recognize the need for leadership in health professions and the ability of practitioners to influence change regardless of whether they have a title or position of authority. Seeks to be valuable to students with interests in administrative positions in various settings, including in high-level clinical positions, and to students who plan to pursue postgraduate training. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing; Bouvé students only.

PHMD 3990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

PHMD 4350. Exploring Academic Careers. 2 Hours.

Seeks to prepare pharmacy students to become more confident and effective as educators. Also seeks to increase the student’s awareness of academic careers and the roles and responsibilities that faculty play in the class, department, and school of pharmacy. The knowledge, skills, and attitudes discussed and explored in this course are applicable across the profession of pharmacy regardless of practice setting. Prereq. Pharmacy and pharmacy studies students only with fifth-year standing.

PHMD 4580. Drug Interactions. 2 Hours.

Designed as an elective course to enhance students’ knowledge and skills regarding drug interactions. Course lectures review commonly encountered drug interactions, with emphasis on the mechanism and clinical significance of interactions. Class discussions and assignments emphasize a scientific approach to identifying and evaluating potential interactions and recommending appropriate, patient-specific management of a given interaction. Prereq. Senior or graduate standing; pharmacy majors only.

PHMD 4581. Cancer Chemotherapy. 2 Hours.

Emphasizes the role of chemotherapy in the management of malignant disease. Discussions include a review of specific antineoplastic agents, a review of specific malignancies, and related topics. Supportive care for the cancer patient is a focus of topics throughout the course. Prereq. PHMD 4621 with a grade of C.

PHMD 4585. Research Methods in Health Systems. 4 Hours.

Exposes students to the research methods that health system pharmacists use most often when conducting research and builds on the content of PHMD 2350, PHMD 3450, and PHMD 4560. Incorporates a seminar discussion format led by healthcare system-based pharmacists actively involved in clinical research and helps prepare students for careers or postgraduate training programs (e.g., residencies) in health systems. Faculty use published studies, live patient databases, and descriptions of their current research projects to illustrate the topics in each session. Prereq. PHMD 3450; pharmacy majors with senior or graduate standing.

PHMD 4611. Comprehensive Disease Management 1. 6 Hours.

Covers foundational concepts of pharmacy practice, including patient evaluation; identification of drug-related problems; pathophysiology; and clinical management of diseases of the respiratory, cardiovascular, and endocrine systems. Specifically covers asthma and COPD, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, fluids/electrolytes, and renal disorders. Reviews, system-by-system, the mechanisms of these diseases and their evidence-based prevention and treatment strategies. Offers students an opportunity to apply scientific knowledge and principles of medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, pharmaceutics, and pharmacokinetics to the design of rational, evidence-based therapeutic strategies to provide care to patients in inpatient, ambulatory, and community settings. Emphasizes pathophysiology, self-care, patient education, assessment, medication administration, management, monitoring, and preventative health and population-based health outcomes. Prereq. PHMD 2350, PHSC 3412, and PHSC 4502; pharmacy and pharmacy studies students only. Coreq. PHMD 4612.

PHMD 4612. Comprehensive Disease Management 1 Seminar. 1 Hour.

Designed to provide students with opportunities to apply concepts from PHMD 4611 to patient cases, special projects, and other medication-related issues focusing on foundational aspects of pharmacy practice, identification of drug-related problems, and diseases of the respiratory, endocrine, cardiovascular, and renal systems. Accompanies PHMD 4611 and seeks to facilitate accomplishment of course objectives using an active learning format. While completing seminar work, students are expected to review, discuss, integrate, and apply information presented in comprehensive disease management lectures and readings as well as previous and concurrent course work. Coreq. PHMD 4611.

PHMD 4621. Comprehensive Disease Management 2. 6 Hours.

Covers the pathophysiology and clinical management of diseases of the renal, cardiovascular, neurological, and gastrointestinal systems. Reinforces foundational concepts of pharmacy practice and diseases covered in PHMD 4611, while completing a system-by-system review of the mechanisms of renal, cardiovascular, neurological, and gastrointestinal disorders and their evidence-based prevention and treatment strategies. Offers students an opportunity to design rational therapeutic strategies to provide care to patients with these disease states in inpatient, ambulatory, and community settings. Emphasizes pathophysiology, self-care, patient education, assessment, medication administration, management, monitoring, and preventative health and population-based health outcomes. Prereq. PHMD 4611 and PHSC 3430; pharmacy and pharmacy studies students only. Coreq. PHMD 4622 and PHMD 4623.

PHMD 4622. Comprehensive Disease Management 2 Seminar. 1 Hour.

Designed to provide students with opportunities to apply concepts from PHMD 4621 to patient cases, special projects, and other medication-related issues focusing on foundational aspects of pharmacy practice; identification of drug-related problems; and diseases of the renal, cardiovascular, neurological, and gastrointestinal systems. Accompanies PHMD 4621 and seeks to facilitate accomplishment of course objectives using an active-learning format. While completing seminar work, students are expected to review, discuss, integrate, and apply information presented in comprehensive disease management lectures and readings as well as previous and concurrent course work. Activities in seminar are reinforced by laboratory skill-building exercises in PHMD 4623. Coreq. PHMD 4621 and PHMD 4623.

PHMD 4623. Comprehensive Disease Management 2 Skills Lab. 0.5 Hours.

Offers a self-paced, blended learning experience designed to provide the student with functional knowledge and skills in the area of physical assessment, patient education, and counseling in the ambulatory clinic and community pharmacy settings. Uses discussions, videos, podcasts, simulations, and hands-on learning activities in the lab. Offers students an opportunity to apply information gained in previous and concurrent courses to clinical situations. While completing laboratory work, students are expected to review, discuss, integrate, and apply information presented in the closely aligned PHMD 4621 and PHMD 4622 as well as previous and concurrent course work. Coreq. PHMD 4621 and PHMD 4622.

PHMD 4631. Comprehensive Disease Management 3. 6 Hours.

Covers the pathophysiology and clinical management of infectious diseases, solid organ transplant, dermatology, and otic/ophthalmic disorders. Reinforces foundational concepts of pharmacy practice and diseases covered in PHMD 4611 and PHMD 4612, while completing a system-by-system review of the mechanisms of infectious diseases and their evidence-based prevention and treatment strategies. Offers students an opportunity to design rational therapeutic strategies to provide care to patients with these disease states in inpatient, ambulatory, and community settings. Emphasizes pathophysiology, self-care, patient education, assessment, medication administration, management, monitoring, and preventative health and population-based health outcomes. Prereq. PHMD 4621; pharmacy and pharmacy studies students only. Coreq. PHMD 4632 and PHMD 4633.

PHMD 4632. Comprehensive Disease Management 3 Seminar. 1 Hour.

Designed to provide students with opportunities to apply concepts from PHMD 4631 to patient cases, special projects, and other medication-related issues focusing on foundational aspects of pharmacy practice, identification of drug-related problems, and management of the infectious diseases and dermatologic and oral/otic disorders. Accompanies PHMD 4631 and seeks to facilitate accomplishment of course objectives using an active-learning format. While completing seminar work, students are expected to review, discuss, integrate, and apply information presented in comprehensive disease management lectures and readings as well as previous and concurrent course work. Activities in seminar are reinforced by laboratory skill-building exercises in PHMD 4633. Coreq. PHMD 4631 and PHMD 4633.

PHMD 4633. Comprehensive Disease Management 3 Skills Lab. 0.5 Hours.

Teaches and assesses various skills, including interpretation, processing, and verification of medication orders; detection and resolution of drug-related problems; use of current pharmacy software programs; and patient education and counseling in the community pharmacy setting. Uses discussions, videos, podcasts, simulations, and hands-on learning activities in the lab. While completing laboratory work, students are expected to review, discuss, integrate, and apply information presented in the closely aligned PHMD 4631 and PHMD 4632 as well as previous and concurrent course work. Coreq. PHMD 4631 and PHMD 4632.

PHMD 4641. Comprehensive Disease Management 4. 6 Hours.

Covers the pathophysiology and clinical management of men’s and women’s health issues and neurological, psychiatric, and oncologic disorders. Reinforces foundational concepts of pharmacy practice and diseases covered in PHMD 4611, PHMD 4612, and PHMD 4613, while completing a system-by-system review of the mechanisms of infectious diseases and their evidence-based prevention and treatment strategies. Offers students an opportunity to design rational therapeutic strategies to provide care to patients with these disease states in inpatient, ambulatory, and community settings. Emphasizes pathophysiology, self-care, patient education, assessment, medication administration, management, monitoring, and preventative health and population-based health outcomes. Prereq. PHMD 4631; pharmacy and pharmacy studies students only. Coreq. PHMD 4642 and PHMD 4643.

PHMD 4642. Comprehensive Disease Management 4 Seminar. 1 Hour.

Designed to provide students with opportunities to apply concepts from PHMD 4641 to patient cases, special projects, and other medication-related issues focusing on foundational aspects of pharmacy practice, identification of drug-related problems, and management of women’s and men’s disease, psychological disorders, and cancers. Accompanies PHMD 4641 and seeks to facilitate accomplishment of course objectives using an active-learning format. While completing seminar work, students are expected to review, discuss, integrate, and apply information presented in comprehensive disease management lectures and readings as well as previous and concurrent course work. Activities in seminar are reinforced by laboratory skill-building exercises in PHMD 4643. Coreq. PHMD 4641 and PHMD 4643.

PHMD 4643. Comprehensive Disease Management 4 Skills Lab. 0.5 Hours.

Teaches and assesses various skills, including interpretation, processing, and verification of medication orders; detection and resolution of drug-related problems; use of current pharmacy software programs; medication reconciliation; presentation of hospitalized patients; and management of sterile compounding systems in the hospital pharmacy setting. Uses discussions, videos, podcasts, simulations, and hands-on learning activities in the lab. While completing laboratory work, students are expected to review, discuss, integrate, and apply information presented in the closely aligned PHMD 4641 and PHMD 4642 as well as previous and concurrent course work. Coreq. PHMD 4641 and PHMD 4642.

PHMD 4700. Principles in General Medicine. 2 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to apply concepts learned in comprehensive-disease-management modules to patient cases, special projects, and other medication-related problems in an active-learning environment. Creates an environment similar to that of acute care advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs) to enable students to gain familiarity and confidence in disease-state management, oral communication skills, and professional behavior and interactions. Focuses on oral presentations and communication skills, which is similar to how students are evaluated on clinically based rotations; students are also evaluated by quizzes and exams to measure mastery of content-specific objectives. Prereq. PHMD 4631; pharmacy, pharmacy studies, and pharmaceutical sciences students only.

PHMD 4880. Special Topics. 3 Hours.

Explores topics germane to the use of medication as established by the course coordinator in various section offerings. Prereq. Senior standing; pharmacy and pharmacy studies majors only.

PHMD 4890. Contemporary Issues in Geriatric Pharmacy. 2 Hours.

Focuses on physiological and practical aspects of medication use in the elderly, the pharmacist’s role in geriatric care, and the management of disease states and syndromes that predominantly occur in the elderly. Pharmacists must assess and assure safe and effective use of medication in the geriatric population to prevent adverse events that increase morbidity and mortality and reduce quality of life. Utilizes problem-based learning by promoting critical thinking, effective use of resources in research, and application of concepts to real-world situations. Prereq. PHMD 4611 and senior or graduate standing; restricted to majors in pharmacy, pharmacy studies, and pharmaceutical sciences.

PHMD 4970. Junior/Senior Honors Project 1. 4 Hours.

Focuses on in-depth project in which a student conducts research or produces a product related to the student’s major field. Combined with Junior/Senior Project 2 or college-defined equivalent for 8-credit honors project.

PHMD 4971. Junior/Senior Honors Project 2. 4 Hours.

Focuses on second semester of in-depth project in which a student conducts research or produces a product related to the student’s major field. Prereq. PHMD 4970.

PHMD 4990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

PHMD 4991. Research. 4 Hours.

Extends current knowledge or offers novel insights through faculty-directed and supervised individual undergraduate research or creative projects. The project must be designed in concert with and obtain formal prior approval from relevant faculty and program director.

PHMD 4992. Directed Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers independent work under the direction of members of the department on a chosen topic. Course content depends on instructor. Prereq. Junior or senior standing.

PHMD 4993. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers independent work under the direction of members of the department on a chosen topic. Course content depends on instructor.

PHMD 5223. Evidence-Based Medicine. 2 Hours.

Studies the principles of evidence-based medicine and how to apply them to patient-centered care. Offers students an opportunity to develop skills in critical appraisal of the scientific literature and practical application of the evidence to clinical decision making. Consists of didactic instruction, in-class group projects, and a group-based written assignment. Applies principles of research methodology, biostatistics, and professional writing. Prereq. (a) PHMD 3450, ENGW 3306, and junior or senior standing or (b) PHMD 3450 and graduate standing; pharmacy students only.

PHMD 5250. Pharmacy Care Management. 3 Hours.

Focuses on the managerial and administrative skills required by a contemporary pharmacist practicing in either a community or hospital setting. Covers classical management principles of planning, decision making, organizing, hiring, and controlling. Case study methods are used as an interactive teaching tool. Also covers pertinent current events. Prereq. PHMD 2350 with a grade of C; pharmacy students only.

PHMD 5270. Economic Evaluation of Pharmaceuticals and Pharmacy Practice. 2 Hours.

Introduces the principles of economic theory of healthcare markets and economic evaluation of health products and services. Economic theory topics include fundamentals of supply and demand, market structure, market failure, and the role of government. Economic evaluation topics include measuring costs and benefits of a specific treatment, types of formal decision analysis, ethical considerations, and implementation in the real world. Prereq. PHMD 4631, PHMD 4632, and fifth-year PharmD standing; pharmacy majors only.

PHMD 5330. Jurisprudence. 3 Hours.

Covers all federal and state laws and regulations that affect the practice of pharmacy. Discusses sources of law including the U.S. Constitution, statutes, administrative regulations, and case law. Introduces federal and state administrative agencies that regulate pharmacy, including the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Consumer Products Safety Commission (CPSC), Massachusetts Board of Registration in Pharmacy, and Massachusetts Department of Public Health. Requires students to research a pharmacy case decided by a court and give an oral presentation. Centers on the individuals who operate a pharmacy: pharmacists, pharmacy technicians, and pharmacy interns; their workplaces: pharmacy, pharmacy department, hospital, restricted pharmacy, managed care, nuclear pharmacy, and wholesale businesses; and duties performed by pharmacy personnel: dispensing medication and counseling patients. Prereq. PHMD 4587 and senior or graduate standing; pharmacy majors only.

PHMD 5438. Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience Preparatory Seminar 1. 0.5 Hours.

Seeks to provide relevant information to enable fifth-year students to make informed decisions concerning the selection and completion of the advance pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs). Using the professional portfolio as a catalyst for exploration, students are required to examine and discuss the variety of APPEs offered. The review of APPE types includes utilizing effective strategies to identify appropriate APPE selections. Students are guided by faculty on how to make APPE selections based on student-identified professional career goals. Prereq. Senior or graduate standing; pharmacy students only.

PHMD 5439. Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience Preparatory Seminar 2. 0.5 Hours.

Designed to provide students with opportunities to apply concepts from PHMD 6438 and to continue to provide relevant information to enable fifth-year students to make informed decisions concerning the selection and completion of the advance pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs). Seeks to provide new knowledge and strengthen existing knowledge to ensure a smooth transition from the didactic courses to APPEs. Prereq. PHMD 5438 or PHMD 6438 with a grade of C and senior or graduate standing; pharmacy students only.

PHMD 5570. Technology in Healthcare and Pharmacy Practice. 3 Hours.

Examines trends and drivers of innovation in healthcare and how emerging technologies are assessed and adopted. Introduces students to frameworks for evaluating emerging technologies and their existing and potential impacts. Uses examples from electronic health records, outpatient e-prescribing, inpatient computerized physician order entry systems, regional health information organizations, personal health records, quality of care, pharmacogenomics, patient-centered and other emerging technologies relevant to pharmacy practice and research to illustrate concepts. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

PHMD 5600. Pharmacy Capstone. 4 Hours.

Acts as a final integrator of the major, general education, and experiential aspects of the student’s education. Expects students to demonstrate motivation and initiative and to work cooperatively with their faculty mentor, community partners, and fellow students (where applicable) in order to complete a comprehensive, high-quality scholarly work (e.g., a research project, educational project, administrative project, business plan, case report, or community-service learning project or professional manuscript) appropriate for dissemination to the university and professional community. The timeline for completion is set by the faculty mentor and agreed to by the individual or all members of the student group. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing; pharmacy students and pharmacy studies students only.

PHMD 5675. Ambulatory Care Pharmacy Practice in Urban Health. 2 Hours.

Introduces various aspects of ambulatory care pharmacy practice and social, economic, cultural, and psychological intricacies. Covers chronic disease management and prevention and wellness. Offers students an opportunity to gain insight into the pharmacist’s role as part of a patient-centered medical home model and/or an interdisciplinary primary care team, with an emphasis on urban health. Requires students to be enrolled in the third professional year of the pharmacy curriculum and to apply and be approved by the course coordinators through an application process. Criteria to be considered include, but are not limited to, grades of B or better in PHMD 4611, PHMD 4612, PHMD 4621, and PHMD 4622.

PHMD 5976. Directed Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers independent work under the direction of members of the department on a chosen topic. Course content depends on instructor.

PHMD 5978. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers independent work under the direction of members of the department on a chosen topic. Course content depends on instructor. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

PHMD 5984. Research. 1-4 Hours.

Offers an opportunity to conduct research under faculty supervision. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

Pharmaceutical Science Courses

PHSC 1990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

PHSC 2000. Professional Development Co-op. 1 Hour.

Introduces the Bouvé Cooperative Education Program. Offers students an opportunity to develop job-search and career-management skills. Students perform assessments of their workplace skills, interests, and values and discuss how they impact personal career decisions. Offers students an opportunity to prepare a professional-style résumé, learn proper interviewing techniques, and gain an understanding of the opportunities available to them for co-op. Introduces career paths, choices, and career decision making. Familiarizes students with workplace issues relative to their field of study and presents the MyNEU COOL database in the job-search and referral process. Presents and discusses co-op policies, procedures, and expectations of the Bouvé Cooperative Education Program and co-op employers.

PHSC 2301. Human Physiology 1. 3 Hours.

Provides students with an understanding of the principles of physiology. Discusses physiological information mostly related to cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and endocrine systems. Focuses on the physiological mechanisms of the major organ systems. Physiological information is related to the specific areas of pharmacology. Prereq. BIOL 1113 with a grade of C– and sophomore standing or above; pharmacy majors only. Coreq. PHSC 2302.

PHSC 2302. Human Anatomy Lab. 1 Hour.

Accompanies PHSC 2301. Focuses on the anatomy of the major organ systems. Interactive CD-ROMs allow each student to study in-depth the structure of each organ system. Prereq. BIOL 1113 with a grade of C– and sophomore standing or above; pharmacy majors only. Coreq. PHSC 2301.

PHSC 2303. Human Physiology 2. 3 Hours.

Continues PHSC 2301. Provides students with an understanding of the principles of physiology. Discusses physiological information mostly related to cell physiology, muscle physiology, and physiology of the nervous system. Focuses on the physiological mechanisms of the major organ systems. Physiological information is related to the specific areas of pharmacology. Prereq. PHSC 2301 with a grade of C, PHSC 2302 with a grade of C, and sophomore standing or above; pharmacy majors only. Coreq. PHSC 2304.

PHSC 2304. Human Physiology Lab. 1 Hour.

Accompanies PHSC 2303. Covers topics from the course through various experiments. Prereq. PHSC 2301 with a grade of C, PHSC 2302 with a grade of C, and sophomore standing or above; pharmacy majors only. Coreq. PHSC 2303.

PHSC 2320. Biochemistry. 4 Hours.

Introduces the structures, functions, and metabolism of amino acids, proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids. Discusses the mechanisms of enzyme reactions, enzyme kinetics, vitamins, biological oxidation-reduction reactions, and bioenergetics, as well as various inborn errors of metabolism. Prereq. (a) PHSC 2301 with a grade of C or BIOL 1117 with a grade of C and (b) BIOL 1103 with a grade of C– or BIOL 1113 with a grade of C– and (c) CHEM 2313 with a grade of C. .

PHSC 2330. Immunology. 3 Hours.

Provides students with an understanding of the principles, mechanisms, organs, cells, and molecules of the innate and adaptive immunity. Monoclonal antibodies, organ transplant immunity, hypersensitivity, tolerance, tumor immunity, autoimmunity, and immunodeficiencies are discussed in light of potential therapeutic interventions. Weekly journal club-style presentation of related assigned topic is required. Prereq. (a) PHSC 2303 with a grade of C, PHSC 2320 with a grade of C, and undergraduate standing or (b) BIOL 1119 with a grade of C, PHSC 2320 with a grade of C, and undergraduate standing or (c) graduate standing.

PHSC 2360. Medical Microbiology. 3 Hours.

Reviews the structure and physiology of bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses, and then surveys the members of each of these groups of organisms that commonly colonize and/or cause significant disease in humans. The survey focuses on human organ systems such as skin and mucous membranes, gastrointestinal, respiratory, and urinary tracts, central nervous system, blood and lymphatics, and others. When possible, demonstration cultures of microorganisms are made available to students, and computer study guides or Kodachrome slide sets are available for review. Prereq. BIOL 1113 with a grade of C– and sophomore standing or above; pharmacy majors only.

PHSC 2650. Introduction to Health Science Research. 4 Hours.

Surveys research methods and topics relevant to health science research with the goal of engaging undergraduate students to commit to research training throughout at least one semester and possibly continuing throughout their undergraduate program. Exposes students to lectures addressing the benefits of a research experience and readings of original literature. Health science faculty from across the university present their lines of research focusing on projects that would be available to students. Seeks to familiarize students with use of the scientific method in addressing unsolved problems and to prepare them to select the most appropriate research laboratory to engage in research. Prereq. Freshman or sophomore standing.

PHSC 2990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

PHSC 3411. Pharmaceutics 1. 4 Hours.

Develops an understanding of pharmaceutical dosage forms, with emphasis on solids, liquids, semisolids, parenterals, inhalation, and novel drug delivery systems. Combines the discussion of pharmaceutical products developed in industry and those compounded in local pharmacies. Focuses on application of mathematical principles and problem-solving skills in pharmaceutical compounding. Prereq. (a) MATH 1241 with a grade of C– or MATH 1341 with a grade of C– and (b) CHEM 2313 with a grade of C and (c) PHYS 1145 with a grade of C, PHYS 1149 with a grade of C, or PHYS 1161 with a grade of C.

PHSC 3412. Pharmaceutics 2. 4 Hours.

Continues PHSC 3411. Examines the physical and chemical properties of the drug as it relates to pharmaceutical product development. Covers concepts of thermodynamics, colligative properties, ionic equilibriums and buffers, solubility, complexation and protein binding, reaction kinetics, mass transport, interfacial phenomena and dispersion, and rheology. Prereq. PHSC 3411 with a grade of C.

PHSC 3419. Pharmaceutics Laboratory. 1 Hour.

Formulates pharmaceutical dosage forms such as powders, capsules, solutions, suspensions, emulsions, ointments, gels, creams, lotions, and suppositories, and tests the quality of the products in the lab using approved methods of analysis. Also provides an understanding of the physical and chemical properties of drugs as they relate to formulation development through experimental observation of dissolution, stability, and effects of pH and co-solvent on solubility of drugs. Prereq. PHSC 3411 with a grade of C.

PHSC 3430. Pharmacokinetics and Biopharmaceutics. 3 Hours.

Focuses on the basic principles and methods of biopharmaceutics and pharmacokinetics. Covers the kinetics of drug absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion; linear and nonlinear pharmacokinetics; general concept of one- and two-compartment models with instantaneous (i.v. bolus), zero order (i.v. infusion), or first order (oral administration or i.m. injection) input; evaluation of bioavailability and investigation of the factors affecting drug availability; influence of the route of administration, dosage form, and regimen on bioavailability of drugs; bioequivalence study; multiple dosing kinetics; general approaches to dosage adjustment in renal disease; noncompartmental analysis; and pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling. Prereq. PHSC 3412 with a grade of C or graduate standing.

PHSC 3990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

PHSC 4340. Pharmacology for the Health Professions. 4 Hours.

Provides the fundamentals of pharmocology to students entering the health professions. Topics include the general principles of drug action, drug distribution, and drug elimination, with attention to the development of reasoning skills necessary to identify, avoid, and solve practical drug-related problems. Drugs are presented according to therapeutic or functional classification. Prereq. PHSC 2303 with a grade of C, BIOL 1119 with a grade of C–, or graduate standing; Bouvé students only.

PHSC 4501. Pharmacology/Medicinal Chemistry 1. 5 Hours.

Introduces the principles and basic concepts of pharmacology and the general mechanisms of drug action including drug receptor interactions. Discusses the major drug classes affecting the peripheral autonomic and central nervous systems including anxiolytics, sedative-hypnotics, anesthetics, anticonvulsants, neuroleptics, antidepressants, and antimanic agents. Considers therapeutic uses, mechanisms of drug action, and undesirable actions including side effects and adverse reactions. Prereq. (a) PHSC 2303 with a grade of C, CHEM 2313 with a grade of C, and junior or senior standing or (b) BIOL 1119 with a grade of C, CHEM 2313 with a grade of C, and junior or senior standing or (c) graduate standing; pharmacy majors only.

PHSC 4502. Pharmacology/Medicinal Chemistry 2. 5 Hours.

Continues PHSC 4501. Covers the mechanisms of action, structure-activity relationships, therapeutic uses, and adverse effects of drugs including cardiovascular agents, hormones, anticancer drugs, antibiotics, and antiinflammatory agents. Prereq. PHSC 4501 with a grade of C.

PHSC 4600. Pharmacy Capstone. 4 Hours.

Acts as a final integrator of the major, general education, and experiential aspects of the student’s education. Expects students to demonstrate motivation and initiative and to work cooperatively with their faculty mentor, community partners, and fellow students (where applicable) in order to complete a comprehensive, high-quality scholarly work (e.g., a research project, educational project, administrative project, business plan, case report, or community-service learning project or professional manuscript) appropriate for dissemination to the university and professional community. The timeline for completion is set by the faculty mentor and agreed to by the individual or all members of the student group. Prereq. Junior or senior standing; pharmacy students and pharmacy studies students only.

PHSC 4850. Capstone for BS in Pharmaceutical Sciences. 4 Hours.

Designed to facilitate integration of major, general education, and experiential aspects of the individual student’s program of study with a focused scientific research experience under the mentorship of a faculty member. Offers students an opportunity to develop a research question, perform data collection and analysis, and satisfactorily complete a quality research report (detailing background; methods; results; discussion, including relevance to their pharmaceutical science career development; and references), followed by participation in a seminar on their work presented to the Northeastern community. In addition, students are strongly encouraged to present their findings at local, regional, national, and international professional meetings. Prereq. Approval of director of pharmaceutical sciences BS program and senior standing; pharmaceutical sciences majors only.

PHSC 4970. Junior/Senior Honors Project 1. 4 Hours.

Focuses on in-depth project in which a student conducts research or produces a product related to the student’s major field. Combined with Junior/Senior Project 2 or college-defined equivalent for 8-credit honors project.

PHSC 4971. Junior/Senior Honors Project 2. 4 Hours.

Focuses on second semester of in-depth project in which a student conducts research or produces a product related to the student’s major field. Prereq. PHSC 4970 with a grade of C.

PHSC 4990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

PHSC 4991. Research. 4 Hours.

Extends current knowledge or offers novel insights through faculty-directed and supervised individual undergraduate research or creative projects. The project must be designed in concert with and obtain formal prior approval from relevant faculty and program director.

PHSC 4992. Directed Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers independent work under the direction of members of the department on a chosen topic. Course content depends on instructor.

PHSC 4993. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers independent work under the direction of members of the department on a chosen topic. Course content depends on instructor.

PHSC 4994. Internship. 4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity for internship work.

PHSC 4995. Practicum. 1-4 Hours.

Offers eligible students an opportunity for practical experience.

PHSC 5100. Concepts in Pharmaceutical Science. 2 Hours.

Introduces new students in the Pharmaceutical Science Graduate Program to important concepts in medicinal and combinatorial chemistry as they relate to drug discovery, and a brief overview of pharmacology, drug metabolism, pharmacokinetics, and toxicology. Also introduces the major drug receptor families and their signaling pathways. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

PHSC 5200. Advanced Immunology and Immunological Therapies. 2 Hours.

Offers an interactive course about molecular principles of immunity and ways to manipulate it. Provides instructive overview of molecular and cellular bases of the immunological diseases. Highlights the problems of modern clinical immunology and immunotherapies. Summarizes the molecular and cellular mechanisms by which the immune system protects the host from disease. Studies clinical cases of examples of the failure of immunity to some infections and, on the other hand, how inappropriate immune responses can themselves cause disease, such as with allergy and autoimmunity. Describes the pharmacological and physiological regulation of immune response and explains biotechnological approaches to develop new effective vaccines and immunotherapies.

PHSC 5300. Pharmaceutical Biochemistry. 2 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to obtain an understanding of the principles of physiological chemistry. Focuses in-depth on the major topics of physiological chemistry, including general chemistry and biomolecules, peptide synthesis and protein structure, carbohydrates and nucleic acids, thermodynamics and kinetics of molecular interactions, and colloids and micelles. Relates biochemical information to the specific areas of pharmacology, pharmaceutics, and drug discovery/development.

PHSC 5305. Professional Development for Pharmaceutical Sciences. 1 Hour.

Introduces and examines the goals, expectations, policies, and procedures of the Masters’ in Pharmaceutical Sciences internship program and professionalism in the field. Discusses the role and involvement of internship employers. Offers students an opportunity to develop job search and career management skills; assess their workplace skills, interests, and values; discuss how those qualities impact career decisions; prepare a professional resumé; and learn proper interviewing techniques. Issues of ethics and professionalism are designed to inform students of issues they will face in the pharmaceutical field. Content of this course is geared to students’ participation in the internship program and overall professional development in pharmaceutical sciences. Prereq. Restricted to students in biomedical nanotechnology, biomedical science, medicinal chemistry, pharmaceutical sciences, and pharmacology.

PHSC 5310. Cellular Physiology. 2 Hours.

Focuses in-depth on the major cellular physiological mechanisms, including physiology of the cell membrane, ion channels and transport phenomena, energy production, signal transduction, synapses, and physiological processes in the cytosol. Relates physiological information on the specific areas of pharmacology, pharmaceutics, and drug discovery/development. Offers students an opportunity to obtain an understanding of the principles of cellular physiology.

PHSC 5360. Anti-Infectives. 4 Hours.

Reviews the structure and physiology of bacteria, fungi, and viruses and surveys significant organisms of medical importance. Introduces specific antibiotic, antifungal, and antiviral agents and classes of agents once a foundation of knowledge of the microorganisms that cause disease is established. Discusses concepts of pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, antimicrobial resistance, pharmacodynamics of antimicrobial agents, and spectra of activity. Prereq. PHSC 4502 and junior, senior, or graduate standing; pharmacy, pharmacy studies, and pharmaceutical sciences students only.

PHSC 5400. Principles of Drug Design. 3 Hours.

Studies important aspects of drug discovery and development with a focus on drug design. Covers basic organic medicinal chemistry concepts and seeks to build students’ skills in lead compound discovery, structure-activity relationship studies, and lead optimization strategies. Topics include the fundamentals of pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of therapeutic agents relevant to the drug-structure optimization. These skills often help develop a strong foundation in the concepts that govern the multidisciplinary process of drug discovery. Uses lectures and peer-reviewed seminar presentations to help students to incrementally increase their knowledge required to identify new, marketable therapeutic agents. Prereq. Organic or medicinal chemistry at the undergraduate level; restricted to students in Bouvé College of Health Sciences, the College of Engineering, and the College of Science.

PHSC 5500. Repurposing Drugs for Cancer Immunotherapies. 2 Hours.

Offers a multidisciplinary course targeted to students interested in recent advances in biomedical research, clinical practice, and personalized medicine as related to cancer immunotherapies. Describes current promises and disappointments with cancer immunotherapies and recent FDA drug approvals for personalized cancer therapies. Explains the role of immunological and physiological negative regulators of antitumor and tumor biology as needed. Explains underlying principles of immunology, biochemistry, genetics, and preclinical and clinical studies when introducing new concepts. Assigned detailed study of specific areas and discussion of assigned papers are designed to complement classroom material. Prereq. Bouvé students only.

PHSC 5555. Pharmaceutical Toxicology. 3 Hours.

Covers fundamental concepts of toxicology and technical methods in toxicology along with comprehensive analysis of both in-vitro and in-vivo toxicity in drug discovery and development. Through lectures given by experts in various fields in toxicology on several topics required for specialized work in research, industrial, and clinical settings, offers students an opportunity to become familiar with methods and analyses including in-vitro and in-vivo toxicity assessments and toxicokinetic-toxicodynamic models and analyses. Includes mechanistic basis of toxicity, methods of toxicological analysis, and case studies pertinent to topics. Prereq. Undergraduate physiology or biochemistry and junior, senior, or graduate standing; restricted to students in Bouvé College of Health Sciences, the College of Engineering, and the College of Science.

PHSC 5976. Directed Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers independent work under the direction of members of the department on a chosen topic. Course content depends on instructor. Prereq. PHSC 5100 with a grade of C and junior, senior, or graduate standing.

PHSC 5978. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers independent work under the direction of members of the department on a chosen topic. Course content depends on instructor. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

PHSC 5984. Research. 1-4 Hours.

Offers an opportunity to conduct research under faculty supervision. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

Toxicology Courses

TOXC 4970. Junior/Senior Honors Project 1. 4 Hours.

Focuses on in-depth project in which a student conducts research or produces a product related to the student’s major field. Combined with Junior/Senior Project 2 or college-defined equivalent for 8-credit honors project.

TOXC 4971. Junior/Senior Honors Project 2. 4 Hours.

Focuses on second semester of in-depth project in which a student conducts research or produces a product related to the student’s major field. Prereq. TOXC 4970.

TOXC 4990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

TOXC 4991. Research. 4 Hours.

Offers students participation in faculty-directed projects in the toxicology laboratory.

TOXC 5570. Clinical Toxicology. 2 Hours.

Examines the potential toxicity of drugs, commercial products, and environmental agents. Focuses on clinical manifestations, mechanisms of toxicity, principles of treatment, and prevention of acute and chronic poisonings. Prereq. PHSC 5100 and junior, senior, or graduate standing.

TOXC 5572. Environmental Toxicology. 3 Hours.

Discusses the distribution, interaction, and effects of toxic agents on the biosphere. Applies the results of toxicology investigation to understanding the environment’s chemical pollution. Prereq. (a) CHEM 2311, PHSC 2301, and junior or senior standing or (b) CHEM 2311, BIOL 1117, and junior or senior standing or (c) graduate standing.

TOXC 5574. Organ Systems Toxicology. 3 Hours.

Presents the principles of toxicology from an organ-systems perspective. Focuses on the concepts used to evaluate toxicity, the mode of injury at the organ and cellular level, and the basic subcellular mechanisms through which toxic agents produce damaging effects. Prereq. (a) PHSC 4501 and junior or senior standing or (b) graduate standing.

TOXC 5576. Experimental Toxicology. 3 Hours.

Emphasizes the interpretation of toxicological literature. Employs structure activity and biochemical methods of assessment to evaluate mechanisms of toxicity of major classes of chemical compounds. Develops the ability to analyze and interpret data in the literature.

TOXC 5578. Biochemical Toxicology Lab. 4 Hours.

Introduces investigative methods for assessing toxicity. Develops the ability to analyze and interpret data generated in the lab and in the literature, and sharpens technical report-writing skills. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

TOXC 5976. Directed Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers independent work under the direction of members of the department on a chosen topic. Course content depends on instructor. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

TOXC 5978. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers independent work under the direction of members of the department on a chosen topic. Course content depends on instructor. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

TOXC 5984. Research. 1-4 Hours.

Offers an opportunity to conduct research under faculty supervision. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.