Management Information Systems

Website

314 Hayden Hall
617.373.3132
617.373.3166 (fax)
Yang W. Lee, Associate Professor and Group Coordinator, y.lee@northeastern.edu

In the global information age, success for individuals and for companies requires the ability to manage information effectively. To that end, the goal of the information management concentration is to teach future managers how to use information systems (IS) and information technology (IT) to help organizations and individuals perform more efficiently and effectively. This can lead the student in two career directions:

  • To become a professional in the IS function of a company or in an IS consulting company
  • To accelerate and enhance a career in another functional area such as accounting, finance, marketing, etc.

Understanding how to get the right information in the right form and format to the right people at the right time is essential in today’s business world, especially when companies and the individuals that do this well are achieving significant competitive advantage. Students have an opportunity to develop new, cutting-edge approaches that allow them to use the powerful resource of information to its greatest advantage. They also have the opportunity to develop technical and problem-solving skills that are in high demand by employers.

Managers in the IS function need to interact frequently with other managers throughout an organization. Therefore, students are encouraged to complete a dual concentration in information management and another area of business. Graduates of this program have a wide range of career paths that suit their particular interests. Professional options include business/systems analyst, database designer and administrator, webmaster, software help-desk expert, project specialist, consultant, network administrator, and IT specialist within other departments, such as financial services, accounting, marketing, or manufacturing.

Management Information Systems Courses

MISM 1990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

MISM 2301. Management Information Systems. 4 Hours.

Explores how a wide range of enterprises around the world use information and information technology to create better-managed, more innovative, and successful organizations. The twenty-first-century enterprise runs on information, and every part of the business has been transformed by the use of information technology. Today’s business leaders, therefore, must have ready access to timely, accurate, and relevant information to manage effectively in the global economy. Prereq. Business majors and combined majors only.

MISM 2309. Management Information Systems. 4 Hours.

Does not count as credit for business majors. Counts as MISM 2301 for business minors only. Prereq. Nonbusiness majors only.

MISM 2510. Fundamentals of Information Analytics. 4 Hours.

Focuses on information analytics concepts and techniques needed by educated information analysts, designers, and consumers to lead organizations in the contemporary information age. Includes concepts, techniques, methods, and strategies for the entire information life cycle—collection, organization, exploration, analysis, manipulation, visualization, interpretation, and presentation of information for business. Each of these topics is introduced with real-world examples and data sets, grounded in relevant theory and principles, and is reinforced using various user-friendly software tools to gain the necessary analytical skills and knowledge.

MISM 2990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

MISM 3305. Information Resource Management. 4 Hours.

Examines how information technology is used to support the functional areas of business (finance, accounting, marketing, manufacturing, and human resource management) to achieve business results (creating new products and services, redesigning business operations, and altering relations with customers and suppliers to achieve competitive advantage). Offers students an opportunity to understand the business issues involved in investing in new technologies. Prereq. CS 2510 (with a grade of C–), ECON 2350, IS 3500, MATH 2280, MATH 3081, MGSC 1201, MGSC 2301, MISM 2301, or POLS 2400; restricted to business majors and combined majors, to information science majors, and to computer science/information science combined majors.

MISM 3403. Data Management in the Enterprise. 4 Hours.

Offers students an introduction to and overview of the methodological frameworks and tool sets for the design, development, and implementation of data-management solutions. Today, almost no aspect of business operates without a strong reliance on the flow of information. Even small enterprises track huge volumes of data, from sales transactions and supply chain activities to Web site traffic. Knowledge workers and managers at all levels within the organization require an understanding of data management, database design and operations, and associated decision-support and data-analysis tools and systems to complete even day-to-day tasks. Offers students an opportunity to work hands-on, applying these methods and tools to solve actual business problems. Prereq. (a) CS 2510 (with a grade of C–), IS 3500, or MISM 2301 and (b) ENGW 1111, ENGW 1102, ENGL 1111, or ENGL 1102; business majors and combined majors only.

MISM 3404. Data Communications. 4 Hours.

Introduces data communications concepts and terminology, network design and architecture, distributed information systems, and security within a business systems environment. The modern enterprise relies on being able to get information to where it is needed quickly, accurately, and securely. From the instantaneous global reach of the Internet, to mobile wireless devices, to multimedia communication, innovations in data communication have directly changed the way business is done today. Explores key emerging technologies such as Web services and Web 2.0, service-oriented architecture, wireless and mobile communication, and multimedia networking. Prereq. (a) CS 2510 (with a grade of C–), ECON 2350, IS 3500, MATH 2280, MATH 3081, MGSC 1201, MGSC 2301, MISM 2301, or POLS 2400 and (b) sophomore standing or above; business majors and combined majors only.

MISM 3406. Introduction to Web Design, Practices, and Standards. 4 Hours.

Seeks to equip students with the foundational skills and knowledge necessary to design, evaluate, and build websites. Offers a hands-on and lab-based course in which students have an opportunity to develop websites for small businesses, including nonprofits and for-profit entities. Studies accessibility tools and standards. Students participate in the analysis of a specific Web practice/service/technology that is relevant for improving the performance and/or security of websites. Uses Web development software for the labs. Each student is expected to have his or her laptop for this course. Prior programming skill is not required. Prereq. MISM 2301 or permission of instructor; business majors and combined majors only.

MISM 3501. Information Visualization for Business. 4 Hours.

Introduces the use of design, interaction, and visualization techniques and strategies to support the effective presentation and manipulation of business information. Based on principles from art, design, psychology, and information science, offers students opportunities to learn how to successfully choose appropriate methods of representing various kinds of business data to support analysis, decision making, and communication to organizational stakeholders. Prereq. Sophomore standing or above.

MISM 3515. Data Mining for Business. 4 Hours.

Covers key concepts, techniques, methods, and applications of data mining in the context of business. Offers students opportunities to learn how to distill key insights from a large amount of unknown data, which techniques to choose from, how to apply the techniques and methods to get the answer and insights from the data, and how to interpret the results from the analysis. Example predictive analysis techniques include market basket analysis and principle component analysis. Covers all techniques using business examples and user-friendly tools. Prereq. ECON 2350, MATH 2280, MATH 3081, MGSC 2301, or POLS 2400.

MISM 3990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

MISM 4501. Business Systems Integration. 4 Hours.

Examines significant improvements to business performance, which can be achieved through sharing information within the enterprise and with customers and suppliers. Realizing the full business benefits of shared information requires changing processes and organizational structures. This team- and project-based course offers students an opportunity to design and implement these strategies and to examine significant improvements to business performance. Prereq. (a) MISM 3403, IS 3500, or CS 2510 (the latter with a grade of C–) and (b) ENGW 1111, ENGW 1102, ENGL 1111, or ENGL 1102 and (c) junior or senior standing; restricted to business majors and combined majors and to information science majors.

MISM 4512. Special Topics in Information Technology Management. 4 Hours.

Examines various contemporary issues in information technology management. Topics may include wireless technologies for business; the emergence of global information systems; collaborative implementation; and others. Prereq. Business majors and combined majors only.

MISM 4970. Junior/Senior Honors Project 1. 4 Hours.

Focuses on in-depth project in which a student conducts research or produces a product related to the student’s major field. Combined with Junior/Senior Project 2 or college-defined equivalent for 8-credit honors project. Prereq. Business majors and combined majors only.

MISM 4971. Junior/Senior Honors Project 2. 4 Hours.

Focuses on second semester of in-depth project in which a student conducts research or produces a product related to the student’s major field. Prereq. MISM 4970; business majors and combined majors only.

MISM 4990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

MISM 4993. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Allows students who have received approval to undertake independent study in lieu of any course required in the various concentrations. Students present proposals to an Independent Studies Committee for evaluation and approval. Every proposal requires a detailed outline of the objectives and plan of study and must be accompanied by a supporting statement from the supervising faculty member under whose direction the study takes place. A copy of the final report prepared by the student is presented to the appropriate Independent Studies Committee. Further information about the Independent Studies Program can be obtained from concentration coordinators.

Accounting Courses

ACCT 1201. Financial Accounting and Reporting. 4 Hours.

Covers the basic concepts underlying financial statements and the accounting principles followed in the preparation of the balance sheet, the income statement, and the statement of cash flows. Offers students an opportunity to become familiar with accounting terminology and methods designed to enable them to interpret, analyze, and evaluate published corporate financial reports. Wherever appropriate, the course relates current economic, business, and global events to accounting issues. Analyzes how financial reporting concepts affect the behavior of investors, creditors, and other external users. Emphasizes the importance of ethics in financial reporting. Prereq. Second-semester-freshman standing or above; restricted to business majors and combined majors and to information science majors.

ACCT 1202. Financial Accounting in a Global Context. 4 Hours.

Covers the basic concepts underlying financial statements and the accounting principles followed in the preparation of the balance sheet, the income statement, statement of equity, and the statement of cash flows. Compares and contrasts the International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) used in other countries with generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) currently used in the United States. Relates current economic, business, and global events to accounting issues. Emphasizes the importance of ethics in financial reporting. Offers students an opportunity to become familiar with accounting terminology and methods and to understand how the information conveyed in financial reports affects the decision making of investors, creditors, and managers. Prereq. International business majors only.

ACCT 1209. Financial Accounting and Reporting. 4 Hours.

Does not count as credit for business majors. Counts as ACCT 1201 for business minors only. Prereq. Nonbusiness majors with second-semester freshman standing or above.

ACCT 1990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

ACCT 2301. Managerial Accounting. 4 Hours.

Focuses on the development and use of information—especially financial information—for managerial decisions within the firm. Introduces managerial accounting concepts, analyses, and practices that support business decisions through class discussions, exercises, and case analysis. Topics include budgeting, cost management and behavior, cost-volume-profit analysis, relevant costs for decision making, cost allocation issues, and performance evaluation. Emphasizes the importance of ethics. Prereq. ACCT 1201, ACCT 1202, or ACCT 1209; business majors and combined majors only.

ACCT 2302. Managerial Accounting in a Global Context. 4 Hours.

Focuses on the development and use of information—especially accounting information—for managerial decisions. Topics include budgeting, cost management and behavior, cost-volume-profit analysis, relevant costs for decision making, cost allocation issues, and performance evaluation. Emphasizes how accounting managers address differences in accounting standards both in recording activities and in managerial actions. Stresses ethics throughout the course. Prereq. ACCT 1201, ACCT 1202, or ACCT 1209; international business majors only.

ACCT 2990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

ACCT 3304. Business Law and Professional Ethics. 4 Hours.

Covers business law, professional code of conduct, and the importance of ethical behavior in today’s business environment. Examines legal aspects of commercial transactions and business relationships. Specifically, laws relating to contracts and sale of goods under the Uniform Commercial Code, agency law, and product liability law are discussed. Note: May not be used as an accounting concentration elective. Prereq. ACCT 2301 or ACCT 2302; sophomore standing or above only.

ACCT 3401. Financial Reporting and Analysis 1. 4 Hours.

Examines financial reporting concepts, emphasizing the link between them and financial statements. Focuses on both the preparation and interpretation of financial statements, with students also being introduced to basic tools in financial statement analysis, such as ratio and accounting analysis. Gives students the opportunity to understand how management decisions can influence reported income, asset, and liability values, and the importance of ethics when making accounting choices. Offers students the tools necessary to analyze the impact of alternative reporting decisions on financial statements. In addition to accounting majors, this course is ideal for students who wish to pursue careers in corporate finance, investment banking, investment management, or consulting. Prereq. (a) ACCT 2301 or ACCT 2302 and (b) ENGW 1111, ENGW 1102, ENGL 1111, or ENGL 1102; business majors and combined majors only.

ACCT 3403. Accounting Information Systems. 4 Hours.

Provides an understanding of accounting information systems, with an emphasis on the role of technology and risk analysis. Information is critical for the effective and efficient management of any organization. Addresses concepts and applications relating to the design, analysis, and implementation of accounting systems. Examines the role of e-commerce and Internet-based technologies, including their implications for ethics and privacy, throughout the course. Prereq. ACCT 3401 (which may be taken concurrently); restricted to business majors and combined majors and to information science majors.

ACCT 3416. Strategic Cost Analysis for Decision Making. 4 Hours.

Develops understanding of the critical role of cost measurement and management in business decisions and in managing a firm’s profitability. Focuses on the strategic use of cost information for planning and control, as well as costing products, services, and customers. Emphasizes the role of management accountants as integral members of decision-making teams and as consultants to senior management. Studies alternate ways of measuring costs to meet different management objectives, the role of budgeting as a planning and management tool, the use of cost analysis as a control tool to help management meet short- and long-term profit objectives, and the importance of ethics in achieving all of these objectives. In addition to accounting majors, this course is ideal for students who wish to pursue a career in finance, general management, operations management, supply chain management, or entrepreneurship. Prereq. ACCT 3401 (which may be taken concurrently); business majors and combined majors only.

ACCT 3990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

ACCT 4412. Auditing and Other Assurance Services. 4 Hours.

Focuses on issues relevant to the public accounting profession and to internal auditors and managers in private or governmental organizations. Topics include legal liability and ethics, business and audit risk assessment, fraud detection and prevention procedures, planning of audit engagements, audit reports, other assurance services and reports, and the effect of information technology on the audit process. Offers students the opportunity to think critically about issues facing the auditing profession. Prereq. ACCT 3401; business majors and combined majors only.

ACCT 4414. Income Tax Determination and Planning. 4 Hours.

Provides a basic understanding of the structure of the federal income tax system. Taxes can have a significant impact on the viability of a number of personal finance and business decisions. Focuses on the individual taxpayer but also considers the implications for other entities. Tax return projects, research cases, and planning projects help demonstrate the potential impact of taxes on decision making. Prereq. ACCT 3401; business majors and combined majors only.

ACCT 4501. Financial Reporting and Analysis 2. 4 Hours.

Continues ACCT 3401 with a more extensive study of financial statements and the financial reporting rules underlying them. Advanced topics include bonds, pensions, leases, earnings per share, and earnings management. Introduces more advanced financial statement analysis tools. Offers students an opportunity to continue to gain the ethical awareness and the knowledge necessary to analyze the impact of alternative reporting decisions on financial statements. Prereq. ACCT 3401; business majors and combined majors only.

ACCT 4970. Junior/Senior Honors Project 1. 4 Hours.

Focuses on in-depth project in which a student conducts research or produces a product related to the student’s major field. Combined with Junior/Senior Project 2 or college-defined equivalent for 8 credit honors project.

ACCT 4971. Junior/Senior Honors Project 2. 4 Hours.

Focuses on second semester of in-depth project in which a student conducts research or produces a product related to the student’s major field. Prereq. ACCT 4970.

ACCT 4990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

ACCT 4993. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Allows students who have received approval to undertake independent study in lieu of any course required in the various concentrations. Students present proposals to an Independent Studies Committee for evaluation and approval. Every proposal requires a detailed outline of the objectives and plan of study and must be accompanied by a supporting statement from the supervising faculty member under whose direction the study takes place. A copy of the final report prepared by the student is presented to the appropriate Independent Studies Committee. Further information about the Independent Studies Program can be obtained from concentration coordinators.

ACCT 5976. Directed Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers independent work under the direction of members of the department on chosen topics. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

ACCT 5978. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Allows students who have received approval to undertake independent study in lieu of any course required in the various concentrations. Students present proposals to an Independent Studies Committee for evaluation and approval. Every proposal requires a detailed outline of the objectives and plan of study and must be accompanied by a supporting statement from the supervising faculty member under whose direction the study takes place. A copy of the final report prepared by the student is presented to the appropriate Independent Studies Committee. Further information about the Independent Studies Program can be obtained from concentration coordinators. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

Business Administration Courses

BUSN 0100. American Society and Management. 0 Hours.

Introduces students to the values and practices that guide business in the United States while previewing the attitudes and behaviors of managers and employees. Seeks to develop an understanding of the context of U.S. business. .

BUSN 0200. Managerial Economics. 0 Hours.

Features the primary economic concepts that govern business. Emphasizes the meaning and use of major economic principles in the business setting.

BUSN 0300. Accounting Principles. 0 Hours.

Features the essentials of accounting concepts and terms. Accounting is the international language of business. In this respect, it provides the foundation upon which all future business courses build.

BUSN 0400. Introduction to Marketing. 0 Hours.

Presents the concepts of marketing, which are central to business success. Features the basic concepts of marketing products, such as pricing, promotion, and placement, through case analysis.

BUSN 0500. Quantitative Business Methods. 0 Hours.

Provides participants the opportunity to aquire mathematical and statistical knowledge that serves as preparation for quantitative analysis. Emphasizes practical applications of sound data and analytical techniques. Prereq. Junior or senior standing.

BUSN 0945. Managerial Skills Workshop. 0 Hours.

Designed as a noncredit course to address student preparation deficiencies in the areas of accounting, economics, or statistics, as appropriate. Students who fail the mandated assessment of preenrollment preparation in one or more of these areas may be required to successfully complete this course. Seeks to help students review and develop their skills in the relevant areas prerequisite to the full-time MBA program. Prereq. Business majors and combined majors only.

BUSN 1100. Introduction to Planning for Business Co-op and Careers. 1 Hour.

Offers students an opportunity to develop the skills and knowledge necessary to be successful in the professional world of work and to navigate their career. It is the first step in preparing for co-op job search in the D’Amore-McKim School of Business (DMSB). Offers students an opportunity to complete a self-assessment to determine their skills and interests within business; to learn about the various concentrations, career paths, and co-ops within DMSB; to learn to use myNEUCOOL, the search tool for finding available co-op positions; to develop a draft résumé for review; and to select a concentration for the upcoming semester’s co-op placement search. Prereq. Business majors and combined majors only.

BUSN 1101. Experiential Entrepreneurship. 4 Hours.

Blends theoretical principles with real-life application. Introduces the fundamentals of launching, growing, and managing a business venture in today’s dynamic and increasingly global environment. Examines concepts within multiple academic disciplines and from multiple perspectives—including marketing, technology, finance, accounting, information systems, people, and culture—and then applies them to new ventures within varied types of organizations. Offers students an opportunity to develop an entrepreneurial skill set and mind-set through the development of the critical thinking, innovative decision making, problem solving, and team building needed for any business, large or small. Note: This course does not satisfy the NU Core experiential learning requirement. Prereq. Business majors and general studies students only.

BUSN 1102. Personal Skill Development for Business. 1 Hour.

Offers first-year students in the D’Amore-McKim School of Business (DMSB) an opportunity to achieve a better understanding of themselves as students and as future professionals. Explores self-analysis, leadership traits and styles, diversity and cultural awareness, professionalism, emotional intelligence, and ethics. Encourages students to draw connections among classroom education, extracurricular activities, and practical experiences and to identify how each component fits into the pursuit of their individual goals. Prereq. Open only to first-year DMSB students.

BUSN 1103. Professional Development for Business Co-op. 1 Hour.

Introduces students to the Cooperative Education Program and provides them with an opportunity to develop job-search and career-management skills. Offers students an opportunity to perform assessments of their workplace skills, interests, and values and discuss how they impact personal career choices. Students also have an opportunity to prepare a professional-style résumé, learn proper interviewing techniques, and gain an understanding of the opportunities available to them for co-op. Introduces career paths, choices, professional behaviors, work culture, and career decision making. Familiarizes students with workplace issues relative to their field of study and teaches them to use myNEU in the job-search and referral process. Presents co-op policies, procedures, and expectations of the Department of Cooperative Education and co-op employers. Prereq. BUSN 1100; business majors and combined majors only.

BUSN 1110. Fundamentals of Business. 4 Hours.

Designed to familiarize students with the contemporary world of business. Introduces legal, political, ethical, and social citizenship foundations and theories that businesses and nonprofit organizations are built upon. Exposes students to the various business disciplines and the role these disciplines play in an organization. Covers several quantitative fundamentals and tools for ethical and socially responsible business decision making. Integrates critical issues affecting the world of business from both a national and international perspective. Offers nonbusiness students an opportunity to develop basic business literacy within an ethical context. Also functions as a foundational, “cornerstone” course for those considering minoring in business. Prereq. Not open to business majors.

BUSN 1201. Living and Working in the United States. 4 Hours.

Offers international students an opportunity to transition to living and working in the United States. Covers U.S. social and academic culture from a college student’s point of view. Emphasizes surviving and thriving in the business classroom and taking advantage of the student organizations available on campus. Also covers the culture of job searching in the United States, including reading the job description, company research, self-marketing, communication (small talk, safe and unsafe topics, etc.), interviewing basics, and accepting a position. Addresses the culture of business organizations and professional expectations. Course activities include role-playing, peer partnering, and site visits. Prereq. Freshman or sophomore standing.

BUSN 1944. Freshman/Sophomore Internship. 1 Hour.

Offers students an opportunity for internship work. Prereq. Freshman or sophomore standing; business administration students only.

BUSN 1990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

BUSN 2990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

BUSN 3201. D’Amore-McKim School of Business Global Leadership. 1 Hour.

Offers students an opportunity to mentor international and out-of-region freshman students in the D’Amore-McKim School of Business; learn and practice strategies to assist their mentees’ transition to a culturally and educationally different environment; and to acquire appropriate techniques of providing guidance and direction in this realm, to reflect on their experience as mentors, and to consider how effective global leadership includes an understanding of cultural differences and transitions in a global educational and business world. Does not count toward degree. Seeks to help develop global leaders who understand and are able to help with the cultural and transitional challenges that exist when students and young professionals move to new regions of the world. Prereq. Sophomore standing or above; business students only.

BUSN 3944. Junior/Senior Internship. 1 Hour.

Offers students an opportunity for internship work. Prereq. Junior or senior standing; business administration students only.

BUSN 3990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

BUSN 4990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

BUSN 4993. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Allows students who have received approval to undertake independent study in lieu of any course required in the various concentrations. Students present proposals to an Independent Studies Committee for evaluation and approval. Every proposal requires a detailed outline of the objectives and plan of study and must be accompanied by a supporting statement from the supervising faculty member under whose direction the study takes place. A copy of the final report prepared by the student is presented to the appropriate Independent Studies Committee. Further information about the Independent Studies Program can be obtained from concentration coordinators.

BUSN 5976. Directed Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers independent work under the direction of members of the department on chosen topics. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

BUSN 5978. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Allows students who have received approval to undertake independent study in lieu of any course required in the various concentrations. Students present proposals to an Independent Studies Committee for evaluation and approval. Every proposal requires a detailed outline of the objectives and plan of study and must be accompanied by a supporting statement from the supervising faculty member under whose direction the study takes place. A copy of the final report prepared by the student is presented to the appropriate Independent Studies Committee. Further information about the Independent Studies Program can be obtained from concentration coordinators. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

Entrepreneurship and Innovation Courses

ENTR 1201. The Entrepreneurial Universe. 4 Hours.

Introduces students to the world of entrepreneurship. Covers the importance of entrepreneurship, the characteristics of entrepreneurs, and the entrepreneurship process. Describes entrepreneurship in its various forms, including startup growth ventures, entrepreneurship in small and medium enterprises, and microbusinesses.

ENTR 1990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

ENTR 2206. Global Social Enterprise. 4 Hours.

Designed to provide students with an in-depth exposure to entrepreneurship in the social sector, a rapidly growing segment of the global economy. Uses the case method to expose students to leading entrepreneurs who have developed and implemented business models to solve social problems such as extreme poverty, disease, illiteracy, and economic and social dislocation. Focuses on uniquely creative and driven people who have dedicated their lives to making a difference in the lives of others through values-based entrepreneurship.

ENTR 2215. Understanding Family Enterprise. 4 Hours.

Covers business, personal, and family issues found in family owned and managed companies, including management of the business, succession planning, entitlement, hiring, nonfamily employees, boards of advisors and directors, compensation, managing conflict, and communications. Designed for individuals who plan to enter into the management of a family business. Focuses on small and midsize firms with annual revenue of $5 million to $500 million. Prereq. Sophomore standing or above.

ENTR 2301. Innovation!. 4 Hours.

Designed for students across the entire University who wish to learn about innovation—the creative process, the different types of innovation, how innovations are created, and how innovations can be transformed into commercial reality either as new products or new services and either in startups, existing corporations, and nonprofit entities. Offers students an opportunity to obtain the fundamental insight needed to understand the innovation process and to become a player in it.

ENTR 2303. Entrepreneurial Marketing and Selling. 4 Hours.

Designed to help aspiring and serious entrepreneurship students to generate and evaluate robust marketing opportunities that may serve as the foundation for a new venture. Once a new opportunity has been vetted, students then have an opportunity to work on developing an entrepreneurial marketing plan. Covers methods for recognizing, discovering, or creating opportunities and validating those opportunities. One of the biggest challenges entrepreneurs face is coming up with the right opportunity for a new venture. This is an applied and experiential course involving field research. Two key deliverables are the opportunity assessment project and the entrepreneurial marketing plan.

ENTR 2414. Social Responsibility of Business in an Age of Inequality. 4 Hours.

Studies how businesses can be agents for social good, both locally and around the world. In an era of growing social and economic inequality both in the United States and globally, many “enlightened” businesses are reconsidering their roles in creating opportunity for disadvantaged or marginalized people and communities. Focuses on businesses that have the resources to invest in innovative social responsibility programs that address the impact of rising social and economic inequality. Considers the tension between the single-minded notion of maximizing profit for investors and serving a broader stakeholder community. The role of entrepreneurship and entrepreneurial thinking plays a key role in student learning. This is an integrative course that includes areas such as business policy, governance, strategy, and decision making.

ENTR 2990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

ENTR 3210. Social Impact Investing: Connecting Compassion and Capital. 4 Hours.

Studies the investors, entrepreneurs, and enterprises comprising the global impact investing universe. Social impact investing is a rapidly emerging sector within the global investment community in which investors fund innovative enterprises dedicated to creatively solving the world’s most difficult social problems, such as extreme poverty, access to clean water, sanitation, agricultural productivity, and literacy. Historically, these initiatives were organized as nonprofits or charities and received funding from donations and grants from foundations and government agencies. Today, many social entrepreneurs are instead using for-profit and hybrid business models to attract investment capital in the form of equity investments, loans, and other forms of so-called patient capital. Offers students an opportunity to develop a practical, real-world, and sustainable impact investing portfolio. Prereq. Sophomore standing or above.

ENTR 3212. Innovation for Social Change. 4 Hours.

Examines three fundamental principles of social innovation—user-centered design, integrated systems thinking, and impact measurement— and applies them to corporate, nonprofit, government, and philanthropic contexts. Through case teaching, multidisciplinary project-based learning, guest speakers, and design research, exposes students to leading ideas and policy perspectives from various sectors and regions. Seeks to embolden student commitment to creative problem-solving approaches that transcend silos and sectors. A final team project is formulated and designed with local partners, including an implementation strategy with investors that addresses the toughest problems confronting human society involving water, food, energy, education, housing, and security for marginalized and vulnerable populations. Prereq. Sophomore standing or above.

ENTR 3217. Global Family Business Leadership. 4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to develop an understanding of the nuanced challenges facing entrepreneurial leaders in different cultural settings. While family businesses have been found to be both numerically and economically significant in most countries, these enterprises worldwide share many common issues. However, there are differences that emanate from specific institutional and cultural contexts. Understanding these differences and how they can affect leadership of a family business is increasingly important for stewards of family businesses in a global marketplace. Understanding the nature of international differences and appreciating the opportunities they offer for growth-oriented family business leaders is especially important as family businesses face unique barriers to international expansion. Required participation in spring break international field project. Prereq. (a) ENTR 2215 or ENTR 3215 (either may be taken concurrently) and (b) junior or senior standing.

ENTR 3219. Microfinance: Fostering Entrepreneurship in the Developing World. 4 Hours.

Investigates, analyzes, and addresses one of the core questions surrounding microfinance: Can business, through microlending programs, truly address the needs of the desperately poor (3 billion people living on two dollars or less per day) in a meaningful, scalable, and sustainable way? Engages students in a theoretical analysis and practical examination of the field of microfinance. Examines the impact of microcredit and microenterprise development on alleviating extreme poverty in developing countries. Prereq. Sophomore standing or above.

ENTR 3220. International Entrepreneurship and Innovation. 4 Hours.

Covers, from an international perspective, entrepreneurial opportunity identification and evaluation; market analysis and intelligence; joint venture and partnerships; agents, value-added resellers, and representatives; regulations, laws, and customs; regional and cultural issues; financing foreign ventures; and choice of domestic and international legal entities. Offers students an opportunity to understand the complexities faced by entrepreneurs doing business in a global environment and to obtain the knowledge that helps them to successfully cope with that environment. Focuses on and emphasizes the perspective of the entrepreneur but also canvases the role of the intrapreneur as an innovator and the innovation process in the international context. Prereq. ENTR 2301 (which may be taken concurrently) and junior or senior standing.

ENTR 3305. Business Modeling for Entrepreneurs. 4 Hours.

Focuses on business modeling for new ventures from both strategic and financial perspectives. Business models have become a source of competitive advantage for new ventures, as important as products, services, and technology. Topics include different types of business models and their implications for revenue, operating expenses, profitability, and startup capital. Offers valuable tools for estimating, designing, and innovating business models; the financing requirements for a venture; sources of capital for venture startup; and deal structures. In addition to examining a series of business model cases, students analyze and assess current business model innovations occurring in high-growth industries. Prereq. Sophomore standing or above.

ENTR 3306. Global Entrepreneurship. 4 Hours.

Offers an opportunity to learn how entrepreneurs start, finance, and manage small businesses. Includes a field experience in South Africa, which involves identifying startups and small business for assistance in developing a business plan and seeking debt and/or equity financing. Students have an opportunity to consider the unique challenges encountered by entrepreneurs in economically disadvantaged communities and the additional challenges presented by South Africa’s history of racism and its current struggles with HIV/AIDS. Teaches students the basic concepts and tools associated with small business management, such as preparing financial models and a written business plan and investment presentation, with the goal that they can provide meaningful consulting assistance to township entrepreneurs.

ENTR 3308. Business Economic History of South Africa. 4 Hours.

Covers the economic history of modern South Africa through lectures from faculty at the partner university in South Africa and also from the Northeastern professor. Includes the country’s transition from apartheid to its present economic and political situation. Offers an opportunity to learn how South Africa has managed to overcome the struggles of its recent past and become one of the leading emerging economies of the world with a flourishing business community. Includes readings in and study of modern South African economics, law, history, politics, and culture.

ENTR 3316. Microfinance and Economic Development in Latin America. 4 Hours.

Utilizes case study methods, student presentations, discussion groups, and research to illustrate effective methods of microfinance as a poverty-alleviating tool. Offers students an opportunity to embark on extensive research on microfinance institutions. Includes a field experience component in Latin America, which involves identifying village banking sites, meeting with entrepreneurs, interviewing applicants or potential borrowers, assisting with microbusiness startups, and distributing microfinance loan capital in the creation of a village bank system.

ENTR 3318. Business, Economics, and History of Hispaniola and Latin America. 4 Hours.

Covers the business and economic history of the field location (Caribbean, Central America, or Latin America) through lectures from faculty at the partner organization and the partner university, as well as at Northeastern. Offers students an opportunity to learn about the region’s flourishing business community and global development climate. Includes readings in economics, law, history, politics, and culture; extensive site visits; and guest lecturers.

ENTR 3319. Innovation Workshop. 4 Hours.

Examines how to identify market trends and innovations that can lead to exciting new products and services. Discusses how to form and manage product development teams, brainstorm new ideas, observe and learn from target users, design new products and services, and see how these translate into financial outcomes. Explores the role of development and manufacturing partners. Offers students an opportunity to do field research and some form of prototyping for ideas of their own creation resulting in a business presentation for investors and the prototype design. Prereq. ENTR 2301 or ENTR 2303 and sophomore standing or above.

ENTR 3320. Base of Pyramid Innovation. 4 Hours.

Explores how innovations are deployed in the developing world. There are more than 4 billion people who could experience an improvement in livelihood from innovations developed to suit their needs. However, due to the design constraints of the developing world, innovators cannot simply deploy to these places without appropriate adaptations. Offers students an opportunity to help develop business models for identified technological innovations in collaboration with local deployment partners in chosen developing countries. The course consists of the following components: understanding an identified technological innovation and the local context that guided its development, developing business model concepts and prototypes, innovating business models in response to feedback, validating the business models developed, and building a deployment plan for implementation. Prereq. Sophomore standing or above.

ENTR 3325. Sustainable Innovation. 4 Hours.

Explores the societal, regulatory, financial, engineering, and marketing dimensions of sustainable innovation. Examines fundamental frameworks for thinking about these dimensions, and then examines how companies and governments act based on case studies. Requires students to do a field project on the application of class concepts to Northeastern University across a broad range of venues, from the consumption of energy and materials to educational and community outreach programs. Prereq. ENTR 2301 or ENTR 2303 and sophomore standing or above.

ENTR 3326. Sustainability in the Latin American Business Environment. 4 Hours.

Provides a theoretical foundation of the study of business activities in the Latin American business context to ensure that externalities are valued in the economic context of the enterprises and also considered in the decision-making process. Explores different methodologies of evaluating sustainability in the entrepreneurial sector of the country of study and of assessing the social and environmental impact of their action. Offers students an opportunity to identify the impacts and directly assist in the development of decisions to control, mitigate, recuperate, and compensate for negative impacts. Prereq. (a) FINA 2720 or an environmental science course and (b) sophomore standing or above. Coreq. ENTR 3328.

ENTR 3328. Field Research in Sustainable Business. 4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to explore, in teams with other university students in the country of study, sustainable business practices in companies ranging from agricultural enterprises to high-technology startups. Working with these companies, offers students an opportunity to create business plans and explore the trade-offs between traditional profits and environmental and social constraints. This course is designed to provide students with a firsthand experience in the dilemmas and trade-offs faced by developing countries seeking to promote economic development while protecting their resources. Prereq. (a) FINA 2720 or an environmental science course and (b) sophomore standing or above. Coreq. ENTR 3326.

ENTR 3330. Lean Design and Development for Entrepreneurs. 4 Hours.

Studies how to rapidly create new products and services. Starting with an introduction to new product and service design and the innovation life cycle, the course applies the management concept of lean, agile development to concept creation, customer research, prototype development, and market validation. Offers students an opportunity to apply these skills to their own new product or service ideas and develop prototypes during the semester. In addition, the course explores cost-effective approaches for finding and managing third-party suppliers for design, engineering, and early stage production and delivery. Students are assessed not only for the quality of their ideas and project execution but also for their ability to work in teams and communicate results. Prereq. ENTR 2301 or ENTR 2303.

ENTR 3336. Resource Management and Renewable Energy in Iceland. 4 Hours.

Studies the economic history of Iceland in order to explore sustainable development and its implications. Emphasizes renewable energy and commercial fishing, land use, and tourism from the twentieth century onward. Settled in the ninth century, over the course of a few hundred years of human activity the long-term equilibrium of the island was disrupted, causing severe environmental degradation. By the turn of the twentieth century, Iceland was one of the poorest countries in Europe. Over the last hundred years, Iceland transformed itself, making it a leader in the sustainable use of natural resources. Studies the process that brought about this transformation and focus on renewable energy and sustainable resource management. Prereq. FINA 2720 and sophomore standing or above. Coreq. ENTR 3338.

ENTR 3338. Field Research in Sustainable Energy in Iceland. 4 Hours.

Explores the use of sustainable sources of energy, as well as sustainable resource management, in Iceland. Through study and field trips to power plants and businesses, offers students an opportunity to investigate the role played by hydropower and geothermal energy in providing a sustainable source of energy in a developed economy and to learn how governments and businesses work together to develop and manage renewable energy and natural resources to create a sustainable environment. Prereq. FINA 2720 and sophomore standing or above. Coreq. ENTR 3336.

ENTR 3346. Family Business in Italy. 4 Hours.

Seeks to provide students with a comprehensive contemporary overview of Italian family business dynamics, politics, history, culture, and society, with an intentional focus on the comparisons between northern Italy vs. southern Italy. Uses formal and informal activities (lectures, company and historical site visits, dialogues) to offer students an opportunity to engage with Northeastern professors, guest lecturers, and Italian family business leaders in dialogue and discussion of contemporary challenges sustaining business across generations as well as related topics concerning the impact of current events, culture, history, and global issues.

ENTR 3348. Family Business: A Global Perspective. 4 Hours.

Studies family multinationals and the role of the family in internationalization. Many family companies are competing successfully and thriving in an increasingly globalized business environment despite assessments that they lack sufficient resources and capabilities to go global. Neither the literature on multinationals nor the growing field of family business studies has systematically investigated family multinationals yet. This course situates itself at the crossroads of internationalization studies on the one hand and family business research on the other. Offers students an opportunity to develop an understanding of the differences and the long-term transgenerational learnings that emerge from the longevity of global family businesses in different cultural settings. Explores the opportunities for family business growth by identifying pathways relevant to family business leaders. Taught abroad.

ENTR 3401. Management of Operations and Growth in Small- and Medium-Sized Enterprises. 4 Hours.

Offers teams of students an opportunity to consult with owners of small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) to develop project proposals and perform field casework specific to the needs of their SME clients. A highlight of this course is the SME consulting project. Through the project and course material, covers how to manage an SME from the day-to-day operations to strategic planning for growth. Exposes students to a variety of ways that an SME can achieve profitability and growth by generating lasting customer relationships, offering exemplary service, managing cash flow, implementing marketing strategies, and developing new and retooled products/services to reach new markets. Prereq. Sophomore standing or above.

ENTR 3403. Managing Operations in a Technology-Based Startup Firm. 4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to acquire a skill set that allows them to develop a project management plan for transforming an idea or concept into a viable working product. Emphasizes the need for cross-functional collaboration throughout every phase of the effort. Explores concurrent technology practices, prototyping methods, and the approaches required for achieving the integration of business and technology interests. Utilizes case studies as part of the new-product-development process. Prereq. Sophomore standing or above.

ENTR 3410. Entrepreneurship and Intrapraneurship in Innovation-Driven Markets. 4 Hours.

Seeks to provide students with frameworks and analytical methods for developing successful growth strategies for startups and established corporations operating in hyper-competitive, technology-intensive global industries. Reviews the key theories and tools needed to understand how technological change creates new market opportunities and allows the emergence of new business models; how firms can use technology and innovation to outcompete rivals in existing markets or to create new, fast-growing markets. Spells out how the evolution of technology and market forces in an industry affects the type of firm capabilities needed to succeed over time. Examines the business models and growth strategies of some of the most dynamic companies around the world and then elaborates on what this might mean for the student’s own career as an entrepreneur in a start-up, as an intrapraneur in a large company, or as a change agent in a family business. Combines conceptual rigor with practical relevance and personal application. Prereq. Junior or senior standing.

ENTR 3520. Impact Investing and Social Finance. 4 Hours.

Explores impact investing, a transformative way to work with money to achieve a more inclusive and sustainable economy. Large investors are entering the world of impact investing, a rapidly emerging space where social and ecological effects of finance are championed over maximizing shareholder value. New investment vehicles such as social impact bonds and Web exchanges are changing the role of financing institutions to better serve the needs of low-income populations around the world. Applies interdisciplinary frameworks, tools, and cases, with hands-on teamwork and guest speakers, to critically examine the field. Offers students an opportunity to learn to develop and test concepts that integrate social responsibility, sustainability, and mutual accountability into current financial and economic systems while expanding social capital markets.

ENTR 3990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

ENTR 4225. Corporate Entrepreneurship through Global Growth, Acquisitions, and Alliances. 4 Hours.

Analyzes whether, why, and how multibusiness corporations expand their operations into new business areas by questioning decisions to grow organically or through mechanisms such as acquisitions or alliances. Uses rigorous case-based discussions, expert readings, and major current events to discuss issues related to the choice of make, buy, or partner. Evaluates how these different corporate entrepreneurial strategies are used to help firms be more competitive and innovative.

ENTR 4501. Business Planning for Technology Ventures. 4 Hours.

Designed as a senior course for entrepreneurship majors. Covers the issues raised when creating a technology venture that goes through multiple rounds of financing in order to become a successful large company. Topics include managing growth, writing business plans, raising money, and formulating exit strategies. Focuses on projects to obtain venture financing from venture capitalists, angels, and corporate investors. Prereq. (a) ENGW 1111, ENGW 1102, ENGL 1111, or ENGL 1102 and (b) junior or senior standing.

ENTR 4503. Business Planning for Small and Medium Enterprises. 4 Hours.

Designed for seniors interested in launching a new venture or growing an existing business venture. Includes developing a business plan, strategy development for small- to medium-sized enterprises, sales forecasting, pro-forma development, debt financing, and service developments. Sponsored by the Center for Family Business, the focus of projects is to obtain a bank loan to start a business or grow an existing small- to medium-sized venture. Prereq. (a) ENGW 1111, ENGW 1102, ENGL 1111, or ENGL 1102 and (b) junior or senior standing; business majors and combined majors only.

ENTR 4506. Advanced Studies in Social Enterprise. 4 Hours.

Focuses on a single developing region. Offers an opportunity to analyze the role of socially-driven entrepreneurship or “social impact enterprises” (SIEs) in alleviating poverty and its symptoms (for example, disease, illiteracy and chronic unemployment) in that country. To prepare for an intensive field experience working with local SIEs on one or more hands-on projects, students have an opportunity to study the history, politics, and development of the country, with an emphasis on the role that private-sector initiatives have played and hope to play in addressing widespread poverty and with a focus on the failures and successes in economic and business development, economic growth, and poverty alleviation. Offers students an opportunity to develop a plan for a micro-investment strategy focused on these and/or similar businesses and organizations having a significant social impact in a developing country. Includes an optional nine-day field component in a developing country during spring break; students who do not participate in the field component are given an alternative research assignment. Prereq. (a) ENTR 2206 and (b) ENGW 1111, ENGW 1102, ENGL 1111, or ENGL 1102; ENTR 3210 and ENTR 3219 recommended.

ENTR 4510. New Venture Laboratory Abroad. 4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to experience firsthand some of the challenges that entrepreneurs are confronted with while searching for entrepreneurial opportunities or solving problems related to critical issues in today’s operating environment. Constitutes the follow-up experiential complement to any entrepreneurship-related course that focuses on a specific area. Requires students to work in teams to tackle problems of strategic importance to an assigned venture. Projects vary widely but typically involve investigating potential markets for a new technology/product/service, evaluating the competitive and strategic landscape, and finding the right path to successful opportunity exploitation. Takes a hands-on approach involving considerable time with customers and experts. Taught abroad. Prereq. ENTR 2301 and junior or senior standing.

ENTR 4512. Social Entrepreneurship and Sustainable Development in India. 4 Hours.

Offers a Dialogue of Civilizations course in India focusing on a social entrepreneurial journey of researching and designing sustainable economic solutions to social problems. The overriding premise of the course is that the inception and implementation of a social innovation begins by understanding a social problem within a particular context and developing a systems-based approach to imagining solutions to reduce or solve the social problem. Through a learning-by-doing approach, offers students an opportunity to delve into critical social problems in the country—gender inequality, financial exclusion, climate vulnerability, environmental degradation, water access, disease, illiteracy, human trafficking, food insecurity, etc.—and work alongside local counterparts. Prereq. Sophomore standing or above.

ENTR 4514. Development Practice and Global Citizenship in India. 4 Hours.

Offers a Dialogue of Civilizations course in India focusing on the personal, reflective journey of the individual and the collective journey of becoming an active global citizen. Offers students an opportunity to enter the personal journey by exploring development practice—what it means to have a life and career as a development practitioner—and by engaging in reflective practice, a set of techniques for synthesizing and analyzing our lived experience, both personal and professional. Also offers students an opportunity to engage in the global citizen journey by learning to facilitate dialogues between their class and their new colleagues and friends in India to better understand their hopes and fears about the globalized context in which we all live. Prereq. Sophomore standing or above.

ENTR 4970. Junior/Senior Honors Project 1. 4 Hours.

Focuses on in-depth project in which a student conducts research or produces a product related to the student’s major field. Combined with Junior/Senior Project 2 or college-defined equivalent for 8 credit honors project.

ENTR 4971. Junior/Senior Honors Project 2. 4 Hours.

Focuses on second semester of in-depth project in which a student conducts research or produces a product related to the student’s major field. Prereq. ENTR 4970.

ENTR 4990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

ENTR 4991. Research. 4 Hours.

Offers an opportunity to conduct research under faculty supervision. Prereq. ENTR 2301 or ENTR 2303 and junior or senior standing; business majors, combined majors, and engineering majors only.

ENTR 4992. Directed Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers independent work under the direction of members of the department on a chosen topic. Course content depends on instructor.

ENTR 4993. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Allows students who have received approval to undertake independent study in lieu of any course required in the various concentrations. Students present proposals to an Independent Studies Committee for evaluation and approval. Every proposal requires a detailed outline of the objectives and plan of study and must be accompanied by a supporting statement from the supervising faculty member under whose direction the study takes place. A copy of the final report prepared by the student is presented to the appropriate Independent Studies Committee. Further information about the Independent Studies Program can be obtained from concentration coordinators.

ENTR 5976. Directed Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers independent work under the direction of members of the department on chosen topics. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

ENTR 5978. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Allows students who have received approval to undertake independent study in lieu of any course required in the various concentrations. Students present proposals to an Independent Studies Committee for evaluation and approval. Every proposal requires a detailed outline of the objectives and plan of study and must be accompanied by a supporting statement from the supervising faculty member under whose direction the study takes place. A copy of the final report prepared by the student is presented to the appropriate Independent Studies Committee. Further information about the Independent Studies Program can be obtained from concentration coordinators. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

Finance and Insurance Courses

FINA 1209. Personal Finance. 4 Hours.

Emphasizes the development of individually focused financial information and a comprehensive financial plan designed to enable the individual to manage his or her financial affairs. Integrates personal goals—such as buying a home, retirement, investing, and insurance needs—to help assure that the financial plan incorporates the major decision stages an individual faces. Prereq. Not open to business majors or combined majors.

FINA 1990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

FINA 2201. Financial Management. 4 Hours.

Designed to develop the financial skills and logical thought processes necessary to understand and discuss financial policy decisions in a global economy. Specific objectives include developing an understanding of the time value of money; using financial statements in decision making; and understanding the nature of financial markets, the cost of capital, valuation of stocks and bonds, management of short-term assets, short-term and long-term financing, capital markets, and multinational financial management. Addresses the impact of legal, social, technological, and ethical considerations on efficient economic outcomes. Requires a financial calculator and provides an opportunity to develop computer spreadsheet skills. Prereq. ACCT 1201, ACCT 1202, or ACCT 1209; business majors and combined majors only.

FINA 2202. Financial Management in a Global Context. 4 Hours.

Covers the financial skills and thought processes necessary to understand and discuss financial policy decisions in a global economy. Emphasizes return and risk management issues faced by financial managers as they operate internationally. Topics include the effects of currency translation and valuation; understanding the time value of money; translating, consolidating, and evaluating financial statements in decision making; determination of the cost of capital; valuing stocks and bonds available in different global markets; and managing short-term assets and liabilities and short-term financing. Addresses the impact of legal, social, technological, and ethical considerations faced by financial managers in companies that operate globally. Requires a financial calculator. Offers students an opportunity to develop computer spreadsheet skills. Prereq. ACCT 1201, ACCT 1202, or ACCT 1209; international business majors only.

FINA 2209. Financial Management. 4 Hours.

Does not count as credit for business majors. Counts as FINA 2201 for business minors only. Prereq. ACCT 1201, ACCT 1202, or ACCT 1209; nonbusiness majors only.

FINA 2720. Sustainability in the Business Environment. 4 Hours.

Examines a variety of environmental problems, including global warming, use and disposal of toxic substances, and depletion of natural resources such as water and petroleum. Many of these problems arise because these are resources that are available to all and so their overuse is an externality that is not included in manufacturing costs. Businesses have been involved in both identifying sustainability issues in their individual organizations and providing a variety of innovative solutions. Uses a combination of readings and case analyses to assesses how both government regulations—such as taxes, subsidies, building codes, prohibitions of use—and business solutions—including zero emissions, green design, producer take-back, life cycle assessment, and corporate environmental reporting—address these problems. Prereq. Sophomore standing or above.

FINA 2990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

FINA 3301. Corporate Finance. 4 Hours.

Designed to develop the skills needed to make and implement financial policy decisions in a global economy. Specific objectives include developing an understanding of financial analysis; company valuation; capital markets; cost of capital; capital asset pricing and risk management; short- and long-term financial policies; working capital management; multinational financial management; and special topics including lease financing, debt refunding, mergers and acquisitions, and bankruptcy and restructuring. Offers opportunities to consider many broader issues including the relevance of globalization; the world economy; technological advances; and legal, social, and ethical issues related to the practice of corporate finance. Stresses written and oral communication skills and teamwork. Uses cases and spreadsheets extensively. Prereq. (a) FINA 2201, FINA 2202, or FINA 2209 and (b) ENGW 1111, ENGW 1102, ENGL 1111, or ENGL 1102; business majors and combined majors only.

FINA 3303. Investments. 4 Hours.

Focuses on investment management as the study of risk and return of financial securities and real assets. Students design and assess models that evaluate investments while recognizing the constraints of the real world. Explores domestic and international financial markets and the securities traded therein. Discusses techniques for valuation of financial assets. Analyzes qualitative concepts such as market efficiency, intrinsic value, and risk. Provides the ability to build unique valuation models to suit the particular investment alternative that students wish to scrutinize. Also stresses portfolio construction, management, and protection, as well as performance assessment. During the semester, students have an opportunity to create and manage a stock portfolio. Prereq. FINA 2201, FINA 2202, or FINA 2209; business majors and combined majors only.

FINA 3990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

FINA 4310. Working Capital Management. 4 Hours.

Examines strategies and analytical approaches to managing current assets and current liabilities. Explores corporate cash management under changing money market conditions. Discusses the use of interest rate futures and working capital management in a multinational context. Provides a summary overview of entrepreneurial finance, with a focus on small businesses, corporate ventures, and intrapreneurship. Applies knowledge of corporate finance in the context of starting, acquiring, managing, and divesting a business or a business unit within a corporation. Topics include analyzing the financial needs of new ventures, exploring sources of financing, managing decline, determining valuation, and reviewing exit strategies. Prereq. FINA 2201, FINA 2202, or FINA 2209; business majors and combined majors only.

FINA 4312. Issues in Corporate Governance. 4 Hours.

Examines the nature of conflicts over control of the corporation. Applies modern finance theory and practice to the issues raised and draws on seminal works in the finance and economics literature that influence the current debate in this area. Discusses legal and ethical considerations that are especially important in corporate-control issues. Uses cases involving well-known takeovers, as well as current hostile takeover battles, to illustrate the theories discussed. Prereq. FINA 2201, FINA 2202, or FINA 2209; business majors and combined majors only.

FINA 4320. International Financial Management. 4 Hours.

Introduces international financial markets including balance of payments, history of the international monetary system, exchange-rate determination, foreign-exchange-exposure hedging strategies, and international capital markets. Examines how the financial strategies and policies of multinational corporations differ from domestic corporations and how financial management is utilized in an international setting to achieve corporate goals. Prereq. FINA 2201, FINA 2202, or FINA 2209; business majors and combined majors only.

FINA 4410. Valuation and Value Creation. 4 Hours.

Explores recent developments in financial management and financial analysis through the use of modern finance theory to make capital allocation decisions that lead to long-run value maximization for the corporation. Focuses on applications and financial model building. Examines risk analysis by building spreadsheet models for valuation and risk-analysis applications. Utilizes valuation analysis models to merge financial, corporate, and business strategies to measure and manage corporate value. Develops an understanding of the mechanics of the valuation process, along with an understanding of the drivers of value and development of strategies for value creation. Topics covered are relevant to value consultants, corporate managers, and securities analysts. Prereq. (a) FINA 2201, FINA 2202, or FINA 2209 and (b) junior or senior standing; business majors and combined majors only.

FINA 4412. Personal Financial Planning. 4 Hours.

Emphasizes the development of personal financial management knowledge by applying the techniques and perspectives of financial planning professionals. Builds upon and applies skills gained in FINA 2201 to personal finance decisions such as retirement planning, home mortgages, and overall risk management. Offers students an opportunity to develop their own financial plan and understand how that plan will change as they age and their life situation changes. Note that while this course is not designed to prepare students to take the Certified Financial Planner exam, many of the topics, such as retirement planning, investment and securities planning, and estate planning, are among those discussed. Prereq. FINA 2201, FINA 2202, or FINA 2209; business majors and combined majors only.

FINA 4420. Mergers and Acquisitions. 4 Hours.

Offers a practical, planning-based approach to managing the mergers and acquisitions (M&A) process. Analyzes how M&As create or destroy value; commonly used takeover tactics and defenses; M&A valuation techniques; alternative deal structures; and the financial, strategic, legal, and regulatory aspects of M&As. The first section covers how and when to apply the appropriate tools and skills to successfully complete a transaction. The second section offers students an opportunity to apply what has been learned to solve real-world business problems. Discusses all major elements of the acquisition process in the context of a logical process. Prereq. FINA 3301 or FINA 3303.

FINA 4512. Financial Risk Management. 4 Hours.

Explores the concepts of financial futures, options on financial futures, and listed options markets as developed to help corporations and financial institutions manage financial risk. Covers financial derivatives and standard hedging techniques first, followed by a study of market risk and strategies in managing market risk. Prereq. FINA 3303; business majors and combined majors only.

FINA 4514. Investment Banking. 4 Hours.

Examines the investment banking business. Investment bankers are one of the most important conduits through which funds flow from savers to corporations needing to invest in plant and equipment. Offers an opportunity to examine the major functions of large investment banks in regard to their investment banking, market making, and asset management businesses; to determine the financing needs of domestic and international corporations, not-for-profit organizations, and government entities by using concepts learned in earlier courses; and to learn to link these financing needs with products that are available in the capital markets, usually through the investment banking houses. Prereq. FINA 3303; business majors and combined majors only.

FINA 4516. Real Estate Finance. 4 Hours.

Surveys the field of real estate including principles of real estate law, transactions brokerage, management, development, valuation, taxation, finance, and investment. Provides a framework of real estate finance and investment, in both theory and practice. Examines all aspects of real estate financing including the primary and secondary mortgage markets, real estate financial institutions, regulations, and mortgage-backed securities. Analyzes the return, risk, and various strategies in real estate investments with financial methods and techniques. Uses case discussions, spreadsheet analysis, and investment projects to make learning effective. Prereq. FINA 3303; business majors and combined majors only.

FINA 4518. Risk Management and Insurance. 4 Hours.

Emphasizes the functional area of corporate risk management. Covers such areas as organizing and controlling the risk management function; identifying, measuring, controlling, and financing risk; selecting the best method of risk treatment; and implementing and monitoring risk management. Topics of exposure analysis include property, liability (public, employer, products, officers and directors, and professionals), income, and extraordinary expense losses. Covers treatment methods such as self-insurance, offshore captive, retention groups, and commercial insurance. Includes recent developments such as tort reform integration of risk management with modern financial theory, as well as implications and analysis of recent tax reforms. Prereq. FINA 2201, FINA 2202, or FINA 2209; business majors and combined majors only.

FINA 4524. Credit Analysis. 4 Hours.

Explores all aspects of credit evaluation from the perspective of banks and other institutions. Introduces industry-grade credit analysis. Credit analysis is used by all manner of banks and other institutions, such as insurance companies, hedge funds, private equity groups, and even elements of local, state, and federal governments, to evaluate clients and potential borrowers who need loans and other structured debt products. Prereq. FINA 3301.

FINA 4526. Core Topics in Alternative Investments. 4 Hours.

Covers alternative investments, including real assets such as real estate and real estate investment trusts, hedge funds, commodities, private equity, and structured products. This course is highly quantitative and focuses on methods for understanding risk, return, and benchmarking of these investments. Offers students an opportunity to obtain a deeper understanding of each of these asset types. Prereq. FINA 3303.

FINA 4602. Turnaround Management. 4 Hours.

Examines strategies for identifying companies likely to fail and selecting and implementing remedial actions. Topics include business turnarounds, troubled companies, workouts, bankruptcies, and liquidations, using case studies and readings. Students evaluate a turnaround plan. Prereq. FINA 2201, FINA 2202, or FINA 2209; business majors and combined majors only.

FINA 4604. Fixed-Income Securities. 4 Hours.

Exposes students to the theory, application, and evidence concerning highly sensitive interest rate products. Explores recent developments in pension fund management, asset/liability management, duration matching, “gap” management, and other important issues confronting domestic and international financial and corporate management. Offers students the opportunity to learn how to customize a risk management program. Prereq. FINA 3303; business majors and combined majors only.

FINA 4608. Advanced Financial Strategy. 4 Hours.

Covers strategic financial decision making in dynamic and technology-driven organizations operating in domestic and international settings. Through case studies, discussions with senior financial executives, and student projects, students gain insight into capital investing and financing decisions in the new economy. An analytical paradigm linking business strategy, financial management, and valuation is utilized to explore financial decision making throughout the life cycle of companies, intended to optimize shareholder value creation. Topics include fundamental financial analysis, capital budgeting under conditions of high risk and uncertainty, startup financing, creative financing, mega-mergers, risk management, and valuation. Prereq. FINA 3301; business majors and combined majors only.

FINA 4610. Entrepreneurial Finance, Innovation Valuation, and Private Equity. 4 Hours.

Covers qualitative and quantitative aspects of entrepreneurial finance, such as venture capital and angel financing. Also covers private equity (i.e., buyout/leveraged-buyout firms), but in less detail. Introduces valuation in entrepreneurial finance, including valuation of startups, using real options to value innovation-intensive firms, valuation in staged financing, etc. Casework emphasizes the practical aspects of qualitative and quantitative issues related to venture capital financing, entrepreneurship, and innovation from the perspective of the financier and the startup firm. Discusses issues related to the venture capital industry, such as the limited partnership structure, term-sheets and contracts, exit of portfolio firms, and international investments. Prereq. FINA 2201, FINA 2202, or FINA 2209 and working knowledge of Excel or other spreadsheet programs; business majors and combined majors only.

FINA 4970. Junior/Senior Honors Project 1. 4 Hours.

Focuses on in-depth project in which a student conducts research or produces a product related to the student’s major field. Combined with Junior/Senior Project 2 or college-defined equivalent for 8 credit honors project.

FINA 4971. Junior/Senior Honors Project 2. 4 Hours.

Focuses on second semester of in-depth project in which a student conducts research or produces a product related to the student’s major field. Prereq. FINA 4970.

FINA 4983. Special Topics in Finance. 4 Hours.

Examines areas of current interest and special topics in finance. Employs a mix of lectures, cases, and projects. Topics depend on the instructor. Prereq. FINA 3301, FINA 3303, and junior or senior standing.

FINA 4990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

FINA 4993. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Allows students who have received approval to undertake independent study in lieu of any course required in the various concentrations. Students present proposals to an Independent Studies Committee for evaluation and approval. Every proposal requires a detailed outline of the objectives and plan of study and must be accompanied by a supporting statement from the supervising faculty member under whose direction the study takes place. A copy of the final report prepared by the student is presented to the appropriate Independent Studies Committee. Further information about the Independent Studies Program can be obtained from concentration coordinators.

FINA 5976. Directed Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers independent work under the direction of members of the department on chosen topics. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

FINA 5978. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Allows students who have received approval to undertake independent study in lieu of any course required in the various concentrations. Students present proposals to an Independent Studies Committee for evaluation and approval. Every proposal requires a detailed outline of the objectives and plan of study and must be accompanied by a supporting statement from the supervising faculty member under whose direction the study takes place. A copy of the final report prepared by the student is presented to the appropriate Independent Studies Committee. Further information about the Independent Studies Program can be obtained from concentration coordinators. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

International Business Courses

INTB 1202. Becoming a Global Manager. 4 Hours.

Offers an introduction to global business. Functions as a foundational, “cornerstone” course that frames the BSIB course of study and maps the way forward. Covers frameworks for understanding the context of global business and the competencies required of global managers. Students work in teams to complete a global business project. Assessments are used to develop self-awareness and establish a baseline for subsequent development. Offers students an opportunity to develop a four-year professional development plan (PDP) to guide their study and development during their time at Northeastern and to develop the global mind-set necessary for becoming an effective global manager. The PDP is referenced in subsequent courses. Prereq. International business majors only.

INTB 1203. International Business and Global Social Responsibility. 4 Hours.

Introduces the student to forces and issues confronted in our era of rapid globalization. Managers must understand forces from interconnected social, political, and economic national environments that affect their company’s operations. At the same time they need to draw on their ethical foundations to address and act on social responsibility imperatives across national borders. Prereq. Business majors and combined majors only.

INTB 1209. International Business and Global Social Responsibility. 4 Hours.

Does not count as credit for business majors. Counts as INTB 1203 for business minors only. Prereq. Nonbusiness majors only.

INTB 1990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

INTB 2202. Analyzing the Global Business Environment. 4 Hours.

Analyzes the global business environment—political, economic, sociocultural—and the use of various frameworks to aid in analysis and decision making. Introduces the global business environment in which firms have to compete. Specifically examines contemporary issues over the political, social, and economic consequences of the globalization of markets and industries. Also examines the responses of multinational enterprises to the challenges of globalization. Offers students an opportunity to review and revise their professional development plans (PDPs). Prereq. BUSN 1101 or INTB 1202; international business majors only.

INTB 2501. Competing to Win in Emerging Markets. 4 Hours.

Presents an introduction to emerging markets, focusing on the BRIC countries of Brazil, Russia, India, and China. Takes the perspective of U.S. companies and what they must do to be successful in emerging markets. Discusses the differences between doing business in an emerging vs. a domestic market, the opportunities and potential of an emerging market, and the risks of operating in such a market. Then looks at the world from the perspective of emerging markets and discusses steps that their governments, companies, and entrepreneurs must take to succeed in the world economy. Analyzes what emerging markets must do to raise wages and incomes, accelerate wealth creation, and reduce poverty.

INTB 2990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

INTB 3202. Managing the International Assignment. 4 Hours.

Seeks to help students prepare for and succeed in an international assignment. Begins with classroom work during the semester before students leave for their expatriate year, continues throughout their year overseas, and concludes with debriefing sessions upon return. Requires monthly reports while overseas to document their academic and co-op learning, Exposes students to cultural diversity and the pervasive, but hidden, influence of culture on how people live, work, and manage. Offers students an opportunity to (1) develop abilities needed to function effectively in situations of cultural diversity; (2) develop an appreciation of the issues that they may confront; (3) create awareness of the personal impact of an international assignment while they are living and working abroad. Prereq. Sophomore standing or above; international business majors only.

INTB 3310. Cultural Aspects of International Business. 4 Hours.

Helps develop awareness of the hidden influence of culture on behavior, particularly with respect to management and management practices. With the increasing globalization of business, many managers find themselves being managed by, or collaborating with, people of different nationalities and cultures. Develops the ability to recognize, understand, and work with the cultural diversity that affects business conducted across national and cultural boundaries. Prereq. INTB 1201, INTB 1203, INTB 1209, or INTB 2202; business majors and combined majors only.

INTB 3316. Economic, Social, and Political Dimensions of Doing Business in Brazil. 4 Hours.

Explores cultural, political, and social dimensions of doing business in Brazil. Investigates Brazil’s role in the global economy as well as the role of multinationals in this rapidly developing economy. Discusses the challenges facing companies that operate in a developing country as the country balances economic growth with environmental and social concerns. Prereq. INTB 2501 and sophomore standing or above. Coreq. INTB 3318.

INTB 3318. Field Research in Emerging Markets in Brazil. 4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to learn how Brazilian companies contribute to Brazilian economic development while being profitable. Studies for-profit companies, exploring how they address issues of sustainability and corporate responsibility within the context of running a company in a rapidly growing economy. Also examines the role played by nonprofits, nongovernment organizations, and government agencies in reducing poverty and illiteracy and in protecting the environment. Prereq. INTB 2501 and sophomore standing or above. Coreq. INTB 3316.

INTB 3320. International Business Management and Environment. 4 Hours.

Examines contemporary issues that confront today’s global managers. Explores the responses multinational enterprises have to the challenges of globalization. Seeks to build an understanding of the environment of international business while addressing the competencies required of global managers. Offers students an opportunity to develop a four-year professional development plan to guide their study and to help them develop the global mind-set necessary for becoming an effective global manager. Analyzes the political, economic, and sociocultural environment in which global businesses operate. Prereq. Junior or senior standing; BSIB exchange students only.

INTB 3990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

INTB 4202. Executing Global Strategy. 4 Hours.

Emphasizes global strategy and execution as well as the leadership requirements necessary to execute global strategy. Offers a capstone, “big picture” course that draws on and integrates all business fields and presents a global manager’s perspective. Uses the knowledge acquired in core courses—such as finance, accounting, operations, marketing, and organizational behavior—along with their international dimensions, to study how global managers reach strategic management decisions for the firm and its role in society. Offers students an opportunity to review and revise their professional development plans (PDPs) following their return from the expatriate experience and begin to develop post–Northeastern PDPs. Prereq. Junior or senior standing; international business majors only.

INTB 4310. Managing the Global Firm. 4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to obtain a conceptual foundation for understanding global trends that affect global competitiveness: the importance of the complex interplay of company-level competencies, cross-national sources of advantage in a technologically driven global competitive environment; and the need to analyze and respond effectively to ethical challenges of a globalizing world. Prereq. INTB 1201, INTB 1203, INTB 1209, or INTB 2202; business majors and combined majors only.

INTB 4860. Special Topics in International Business. 4 Hours.

Examines areas of current interest and special topics in the field of international business.

INTB 4970. Junior/Senior Honors Project 1. 4 Hours.

Focuses on in-depth project in which a student conducts research or produces a product related to the student’s major field. Combined with Junior/Senior Project 2 or college-defined equivalent for 8 credit honors project.

INTB 4971. Junior/Senior Honors Project 2. 4 Hours.

Focuses on second semester of in-depth project in which a student conducts research or produces a product related to the student’s major field. Prereq. INTB 4970.

INTB 4990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

INTB 4991. Research. 4 Hours.

Offers an opportunity to conduct research under faculty supervision.

INTB 4993. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Allows students who have received approval to undertake independent study in lieu of any course required in the various concentrations. Students present proposals to an Independent Studies Committee for evaluation and approval. Every proposal requires a detailed outline of the objectives and plan of study and must be accompanied by a supporting statement from the supervising faculty member under whose direction the study takes place. A copy of the final report prepared by the student is presented to the appropriate Independent Studies Committee. Further information about the Independent Studies Program can be obtained from concentration coordinators.

INTB 4998. International Business Undergraduate Thesis Continuation. 0 Hours.

Offers thesis continuation for students in the BSIB program who are working on their thesis as part of the dual-degree requirements. Prereq. Senior standing; international business students only.

INTB 5976. Directed Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers independent work under the direction of members of the department on chosen topics. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

INTB 5978. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Allows students who have received approval to undertake independent study in lieu of any course required in the various concentrations. Students present proposals to an Independent Studies Committee for evaluation and approval. Every proposal requires a detailed outline of the objectives and plan of study and must be accompanied by a supporting statement from the supervising faculty member under whose direction the study takes place. A copy of the final report prepared by the student is presented to the appropriate Independent Studies Committee. Further information about the Independent Studies Program can be obtained from concentration coordinators. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

Management Courses

MGMT 1990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

MGMT 2990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

MGMT 3302. Negotiating in Business. 4 Hours.

Focuses on the nature of conflict, conflict resolution, and the structure and process of negotiations, negotiation ethics, as well as skills to deal with “difficult” negotiators. Negotiation is a lifelong skill that we use every day, not just a tactic to get a higher salary or a better deal. No matter what direction one’s professional life takes, negotiation is an essential part of one’s job and one’s life. To be effective, one must be a skillful negotiator. While some of us are naturally gifted negotiators, most of us are not; the concepts and techniques of skillful negotiations can be learned and practiced in the classroom. Offers students numerous opportunities to develop and practice negotiating skills. Prereq. Sophomore standing or above; business majors and combined majors only.

MGMT 3330. Developing Leaders for Global Sustainability. 4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to learn how to effectively research and communicate about global environmental sustainability in both their companies and their communities. Emphasizes how to be an effective lay consumer of scientific knowledge. Students work with the latest science on such global issues as climate change and energy depletion. Analyzes how key stakeholders—businesses, governments, and communities—interact on current issues in global sustainability. Prereq. Sophomore standing or above; business majors and combined majors only.

MGMT 3340. Managing Healthcare Organizations: Critical Challenges and New Approaches. 4 Hours.

Designed for students interested in careers with significant healthcare managerial responsibilities. Presents the critical challenges and core issues facing managers in hospitals; insurance and managed-care organizations; pharmaceutical, biotechnology, medical device, and software companies; long-term care organizations; healthcare research and consulting organizations; and the government. Covers the newest clinical care and financial models, the pivotal role of healthcare information technology, and the impact of federal and state laws and legislative initiatives on the operations and strategies of industry players. Prereq. Sophomore standing or above.

MGMT 3350. Managing a Diverse Workforce. 4 Hours.

As the labor force becomes increasingly diverse, a strong emphasis is being placed on diversity-related issues of all kinds in the workplace. Diversity in the workplace may result from differences in individual characteristics such as religion, gender, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, national origin, age, and physical ability/disability. Organizations need to address diversity issues in some manner if they are to compete effectively in a global economy. This courses examines issues related to managing oneself and others in an increasingly diverse workforce. Diversity-related issues with management implications to be examined include religion, social identity, socialization, employment decisions by applicants and organizations, team dynamics, leadership, sexual harassment, workplace romance, career development, work and family, accommodation of people with disabilities, and organizational strategies for promoting equal opportunity and a multicultural approach towards diversity. Offers students an opportunity to conduct self-assessments to monitor their own workforce needs as they relate to issues of diversity, careers, and work-life integration. Prereq. Sophomore standing or above; business majors and combined majors only.

MGMT 3360. Law and the Legal Process. 4 Hours.

Introduces U.S. laws and legal system, with a focus on the legal rights of individuals and business organizations and the legal obligations they each owe to others. Looks at the role of the legal systems in making and enforcing laws and resolving disputes. Uses exercises, team projects, and presentations to identify and gain understanding of the particular legal environment for different activities and situations. Explores the impact of the legal environment on the internet, employment, innovation, and relationships with sellers, customers, and competitors. Includes consideration of contract, intellectual property, negligence, incorporation, criminal and agency laws. Prereq. Sophomore standing or above.

MGMT 3420. Managing Human Capital. 4 Hours.

Offers an overview of the human resources management (HRM) function, including recruiting and hiring new employees, overseeing compensation and benefits, improving employee relations, and ensuring compliance with labor laws. Focuses on what a (non-HRM) manager needs to know about HRM and also seeks to provide a foundation for the HRM professional. Prereq. Sophomore standing or above; business majors and combined majors only.

MGMT 3435. Social Networks and Organizations. 4 Hours.

Examines three different perspectives on “social networks”: interpersonal networks within organizations—their formation, their content and structure, and how those factors affect the performance of individuals and the organization; interorganizational networks (such as alliances or board interlocks)—factors that affect their formation and their impact on organizations and industries; and social network and social media—their use by organizations and how such use affects an organization’s mission, identity, and employees. Organizations increasingly comprise a shifting web of interactions among people that defy traditional hierarchies and structures. Understanding how these social networks form and operate can be critical not only to a manager’s day-to-day effectiveness but for long-term career success as well. Prereq. Sophomore standing or above; business majors and combined majors only.

MGMT 3510. Managing Global Teams Virtually and Locally. 4 Hours.

Studies how understanding culture, cross-cultural differences and similarities, as well as the characteristics of the global work context, are necessary for becoming successful leaders in global organizations. The main objectives of this course are to sensitize professionals and managers to similarities and differences in cultural values, management practices, and behaviors; to facilitate their adaptation to the global, multicultural work context; and to develop awareness to one’s own culture and how it is perceived by others. Offers students an opportunity to learn how to successfully manage multicultural and virtual teams. Prereq. ORGB 3201 or ORGB 3209.

MGMT 3530. Project Management. 4 Hours.

Discusses why good project management skills are essential to a wide variety of business careers. Covers why many important business projects fail due to poor planning, poor time management, going over budget, and/or ineffective communication. Includes a balance of strategic, technical, and behavioral issues in project management. Prereq. Junior or senior standing.

MGMT 3990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

MGMT 4310. The Management Practices of Great Organizations. 4 Hours.

Focuses on a wide range of management practices, many of which are “radical” and represent organizations that “dare to be different.” The course uses many teaching approaches, including case studies, class exercises, and “competitions” that require students—and seek to increase their ability—to debate, present, think on their feet, and ask tough questions. Some organizations seem “to work”; they provide high-quality products and services, they treat their employees with respect, they behave ethically, they are strong financially, and the like. The key question of this course is “How do they do it; i.e., why do they work so well?” Students study and debate the criteria for a great organization in order to answer this question. Prereq. COOP 3945 and junior or senior standing; business majors and combined majors only.

MGMT 4410. Human Resources and Workforce Analytics. 4 Hours.

Introduces evidenced-based workforce management, including identifying the strategic work that is truly necessary to execute firm strategy, investing in differentiated management systems that support that work, and designing and implementing targeted measurement systems (HR function and workforce scorecards) designed to hold line managers accountable for strategic talent. Emphasizes helping students move from a focus on levels associated with a particular workforce attribute to understanding the impact of the workforce on business-level outcomes (e.g., how does product manager quality affect new product cycle time?). In addition to those interested in HR, the course could be highly relevant for students specializing in corporate finance, marketing, and international business.

MGMT 4501. Skills for Managerial Success. 4 Hours.

Builds on co-op experiences to focus on skills critical to effective management in all fields. Using experiential exercises, self-assessment, feedback, and coaching, offers students an opportunity to develop in such areas as leading teams; being effective team members; giving feedback; and improving written and oral persuasion, motivational, and problem-solving skills. Prereq. (a) COOP 3945 and (b) ENGW 1111, ENGW 1102, ENGL 1111, or ENGL 1102 and (c) junior or senior standing; business majors and combined majors only.

MGMT 4603. Leadership Seminar. 4 Hours.

Explores the hallmarks of effective leadership in a wide variety of organizational settings, including not only the top echelon of leaders but also those lower in the hierarchy, who by developing an appropriate skill set can accrue personal power and influence those who outrank them. Designed to help students assess their own leadership style, thereby increasing the likelihood of career success. Prereq. ORGB 3201, ORGB 3202, or COOP 3945; business majors and combined majors only.

MGMT 4970. Junior/Senior Honors Project 1. 4 Hours.

Focuses on in-depth project in which a student conducts research or produces a product related to the student’s major field. Combined with Junior/Senior Project 2 or college-defined equivalent for 8 credit honors project.

MGMT 4971. Junior/Senior Honors Project 2. 4 Hours.

Focuses on second semester of in-depth project in which a student conducts research or produces a product related to the student’s major field. Prereq. MGMT 4970.

MGMT 4990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

MGMT 4993. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Allows students who have received approval to undertake independent study in lieu of any course required in the various concentrations. Students present proposals to an Independent Studies Committee for evaluation and approval. Every proposal requires a detailed outline of the objectives and plan of study and must be accompanied by a supporting statement from the supervising faculty member under whose direction the study takes place. A copy of the final report prepared by the student is presented to the appropriate Independent Studies Committee. Further information about the Independent Studies Program can be obtained from concentration coordinators.

MGMT 5976. Directed Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers independent work under the direction of members of the department on chosen topics. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

MGMT 5978. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Allows students who have received approval to undertake independent study in lieu of any course required in the various concentrations. Students present proposals to an Independent Studies Committee for evaluation and approval. Every proposal requires a detailed outline of the objectives and plan of study and must be accompanied by a supporting statement from the supervising faculty member under whose direction the study takes place. A copy of the final report prepared by the student is presented to the appropriate Independent Studies Committee. Further information about the Independent Studies Program can be obtained from concentration coordinators. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

Management Science Courses

MGSC 1990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

MGSC 2201. Operations Management. 2 Hours.

Considers the productive system of an enterprise whereby inputs of people, materials, information, and technology are transformed into useful goods and/or services. Topics include types of production processes, process flow analysis, capacity analysis, inventory and quality management, and so on. Provides an overview of the problems and issues encountered by an operations manager. Although a variety of models and techniques are discussed, the emphasis is on the problem formulation, managerial implication, and the impact on operations strategy. Prereq. ACCT 1201, ACCT 1202, or ACCT 1209 (any may be taken concurrently); business majors and combined majors only. Coreq. SCHM 2201.

MGSC 2301. Business Statistics. 4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to obtain the necessary skills to collect, summarize, analyze, and interpret business-related data. Covers descriptive statistics, sampling and sampling distributions, statistical inference, relationships between variables, formulating and testing hypotheses, and regression analysis in the context of business. Use of the SPSS statistical programming package is an integral part of the course. Prereq. Business majors and combined majors only.

MGSC 2990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

MGSC 3990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

MGSC 4990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

MGSC 4993. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Allows students who have received approval to undertake independent study in lieu of any course required in the various concentrations. Students present proposals to an Independent Studies Committee for evaluation and approval. Every proposal requires a detailed outline of the objectives and plan of study and must be accompanied by a supporting statement from the supervising faculty member under whose direction the study takes place. A copy of the final report prepared by the student is presented to the appropriate Independent Studies Committee. Further information about the Independent Studies Program can be obtained from concentration coordinators.

MGSC 5976. Directed Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers independent work under the direction of members of the department on chosen topics. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

MGSC 5978. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Allows students who have received approval to undertake independent study in lieu of any course required in the various concentrations. Students present proposals to an Independent Studies Committee for evaluation and approval. Every proposal requires a detailed outline of the objectives and plan of study and must be accompanied by a supporting statement from the supervising faculty member under whose direction the study takes place. A copy of the final report prepared by the student is presented to the appropriate Independent Studies Committee. Further information about the Independent Studies Program can be obtained from concentration coordinators. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

Marketing Courses

MKTG 1990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

MKTG 2201. Introduction to Marketing. 4 Hours.

Provides an overview of the role of marketing in business and society. Considers the planning, implementation, and evaluation of marketing efforts in consumer and business-to-business companies, in service and goods companies, and in for-profit and nonprofit organizations. Also examines contemporary issues in marketing that can affect organizational success. A term project is used to enable students to apply their learning about the fundamentals of marketing. Prereq. ACCT 1201, ACCT 1202, or ACCT 1209 (any of which may be taken concurrently); business majors and combined majors only.

MKTG 2202. Introduction to Marketing in a Global Context. 4 Hours.

Covers the role of marketing in business and society. Considers the planning, implementation, and evaluation of marketing efforts in consumer and business-to-business companies, in services and goods companies, and in for-profit and nonprofit organizations. Focuses on the cultural, social, and political challenges faced by global firms as they conduct market research and develop and vary marketing strategies to be successful in multiple markets internationally. Also examines contemporary issues in marketing that can affect organizational success. Requires students to apply their learning about the fundamentals of marketing in a term project. Prereq. ACCT 1201, ACCT 1202, or ACCT 1209; international business students only.

MKTG 2209. Introduction to Marketing. 4 Hours.

Does not count as credit for business majors. Counts as MKTG 2201 for business minors only. Prereq. Nonbusiness majors with sophomore standing or above.

MKTG 2301. Marketing and Society. 4 Hours.

Examines the role of marketing and business in society’s central contemporary problems as well as the way marketing can take a positive and influential role in the efforts to address these problems. Reviews some of our society’s main problems and a critical view of marketing and business in today’s world. Also examines changing marketing practices and roles for businesses as firms and institutions become more socially responsible and ethically aware. Finally, introduces and analyzes the role of prosocial marketing, how marketing can influence people’s behavior for advancing a socially desirable change. Offers students an opportunity to better understand our society and enhance an ethical mind-set, while highlighting the ways marketers can contribute to societal well-being. Prereq. Sophomore standing or above.

MKTG 2990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

MKTG 3301. Marketing Management. 4 Hours.

Focuses on the marketing process through the use of case studies simulating actual business settings and marketing challenges. Develops skill in marketing decision making, critical analysis, and communication. Topics include techniques for undertaking market analysis, marketing strategy (segmentation and positioning), and marketing implementation (4 Ps). A marketing plan project is used to enable students to apply their understanding about the marketing process. Prereq. (a) MKTG 2201, MKTG 2202, or MKTG 2209 and (b) ENGW 1111, ENGW 1102, ENGL 1111, or ENGL 1102; business majors and combined majors only.

MKTG 3401. Marketing Research. 4 Hours.

Focuses on the marketing research process and the analysis of data using statistical software. Helps students develop an understanding of consumer attitudes and behavior processes as the basis of the design of marketing problems. Topics include problem definition, research design, sampling, attitude measurement, questionnaire design, data collection, and data analysis. Students are expected to work on group projects. The course requires no previous computer experience. Prereq. (a) MKTG 2201, MKTG 2202, or MKTG 2209 and (b) ECON 2350, IS 3500, MATH 2280, MATH 3081, MGSC 1201, MGSC 2301, or POLS 2400 and (c) 56 SH toward degree; business majors and combined majors only.

MKTG 3501. Marketing Analytics. 4 Hours.

Studies the importance of using an analytical approach to support marketing decision making in organizations and offers students an opportunity to learn how to implement such an approach in practice. Focuses on data science in marketing: identifying and acquiring the right data for addressing different marketing challenges, building skills necessary for conducting relevant quantitative analyses, and guiding how to use obtained insights to make better marketing decisions. Topics may include product innovation, market identification and segmentation, customer valuation, media attribution models, and assessment of digital and social media. Students are expected to apply statistical concepts and use relevant software packages for analyzing marketing datasets. Prereq. MKTG 3401 (may be taken concurrently) and sophomore standing or above; business majors and combined majors only.

MKTG 3990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

MKTG 4220. Marketing in Asia. 4 Hours.

Studies the opportunities and challenges associated with the increasing globalization of Indian and Asian markets. During this Dialogue of Civilizations, students study key environmental forces shaping consumer needs and preferences, the impact of foreign political and economic factors on entering companies, the influence of international competition, market segmentation, and strategy decisions specific to Asian marketing. Analyzes the impact of cultural, social, political, and economic factors on marketing strategies. Offers students an opportunity to learn how to determine when to use different market entry and penetration strategies and how to examine the different skills and systems required to implement marketing strategies in India and broader Asia.

MKTG 4310. Retailing. 4 Hours.

Explores the basic concepts of retailing strategy and positioning, evaluating the retail environment and customer behavior and trends. Retail functions are also examined, focusing on site selection and trading area; merchandise selection and display; layout and design; retail pricing; customer service and image management; retail technology; and operations management. Students do extensive fieldwork applying and exploring the concepts through homework assignments and projects. Industry experts provide exposure to current trends and procedures. Prereq. MKTG 2201, MKTG 2202, or MKTG 2209; business majors and combined majors only.

MKTG 4420. Sales Management. 4 Hours.

Focuses on the entire sales effort. Offers students the opportunity to apply a proven selling process and present compelling solutions to customers. Topics include how to translate product features into buyer benefits, how to handle customer objections, and how to close sales and deals. Covers team selling and relationship marketing. Intended for students interested in a sales career as well as future product managers who must rely on the sales force to introduce new products and promotions. Prereq. (a) MKTG 2201, MKTG 2202, or MKTG 2209 and (b) junior or senior standing; business majors and combined majors only.

MKTG 4502. Marketing in the Service Sector. 4 Hours.

Provides a basic treatment of methods and techniques for marketing in the service sector, which includes sports, recreation, public service, banking, insurance, and hotels. Analyzes a number of descriptive studies covering the application of marketing principles in key service areas as well as the principles themselves. Prereq. MKTG 2201, MKTG 2202, or MKTG 2209 and junior or senior standing; business majors and combined majors only.

MKTG 4504. Advertising and Brand Promotion. 4 Hours.

Focuses on managing and integrating marketing communications in relation to a company’s overall marketing objectives. Includes advertising; creative and media strategy; the communication process; direct and interactive marketing; consumer and trade promotions; public relations; and the social, ethical, and economic considerations underlying marketing communications in the twenty-first century. Prereq. (a) MKTG 2201, MKTG 2202, or MKTG 2209 and (b) junior or senior standing; business majors and combined majors only.

MKTG 4506. Consumer Behavior. 4 Hours.

Focuses on demographics, lifestyle, social and cultural trends, and their impact on consumer motivations and behavior. A thorough understanding of the consumer is at the heart of marketing. Topics include the consumer decision-making process, family, learning, personality, and group dynamics, and their impacts on the business world. Ultimately, we are all consumers and we are all part of society, so consumer behavior is critical to all of us. Prereq. (a) MKTG 2201, MKTG 2202, or MKTG 2209 and (b) junior or senior standing; business majors and combined majors only.

MKTG 4508. Digital Marketing. 4 Hours.

Examines the impact of technology on the marketing of goods and services. Focuses on the Internet and the World Wide Web. Investigates recent trends in e-business and identifies marketing strategies that work in this new environment. Introduces students to frameworks that help explain current issues in electronic marketing. Although the focus is on Internet marketing strategy, phenomena such as television home shopping and database marketing are also explored. Readings, cases, discussions, lectures, guest speakers, student reports, and exercises on the World Wide Web are all utilized. Prereq. MKTG 2201, MKTG 2202, or MKTG 2209 and junior or senior standing; business majors and combined majors only.

MKTG 4510. New Product Development. 4 Hours.

Provides an overview of the new-product-development process, with an emphasis on customer involvement in this process. Detailed insights are provided on such topics as new-product strategy, idea generation, idea selection and evaluation, concept development and testing, product development and testing, and market testing and product launch. Prereq. MKTG 3401 (may be taken concurrently); business majors and combined majors only.

MKTG 4512. International Marketing. 4 Hours.

Introduces those aspects of marketing that are unique to international business within the framework of traditional functional areas of marketing. Focuses on the environment and the modifications of marketing concepts and practices necessitated by environmental differences. Topics include cultural dynamics in international markets, political and legal environmental constraints, educational and economic constraints, international marketing research, international marketing institutions, and marketing practices abroad. Prereq. MKTG 2201, MKTG 2202, or MKTG 2209; business majors and combined majors only.

MKTG 4970. Junior/Senior Honors Project 1. 4 Hours.

Focuses on in-depth project in which a student conducts research or produces a product related to the student’s major field. Combined with Junior/Senior Project 2 or college-defined equivalent for 8 credit honors project.

MKTG 4971. Junior/Senior Honors Project 2. 4 Hours.

Focuses on second semester of in-depth project in which a student conducts research or produces a product related to the student’s major field. Prereq. MKTG 4970.

MKTG 4990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

MKTG 4993. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Allows students who have received approval to undertake independent study in lieu of any course required in the various concentrations. Students present proposals to an Independent Studies Committee for evaluation and approval. Every proposal requires a detailed outline of the objectives and plan of study and must be accompanied by a supporting statement from the supervising faculty member under whose direction the study takes place. A copy of the final report prepared by the student is presented to the appropriate Independent Studies Committee. Further information about the Independent Studies Program can be obtained from concentration coordinators.

MKTG 5976. Directed Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers independent work under the direction of members of the department on chosen topics. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

MKTG 5978. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Allows students who have received approval to undertake independent study in lieu of any course required in the various concentrations. Students present proposals to an Independent Studies Committee for evaluation and approval. Every proposal requires a detailed outline of the objectives and plan of study and must be accompanied by a supporting statement from the supervising faculty member under whose direction the study takes place. A copy of the final report prepared by the student is presented to the appropriate Independent Studies Committee. Further information about the Independent Studies Program can be obtained from concentration coordinators. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

Organizational Behavior Courses

ORGB 1990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

ORGB 2990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

ORGB 3201. Organizational Behavior. 4 Hours.

Provides an overview of the actions and behaviors of people in organizations. Uses case studies, videos, experiential exercises, lectures, and discussions to explore the effects of individual, interpersonal, group, organizational, and cross-cultural factors on human behavior. Topics include groups and teams, motivation, leadership, organizational change, organizational culture, structure, conflict resolution, and communication. Both the underlying theories and principles of these topics, as well as their practical applications and implications for organizations, are covered. Prereq. COOP 3945 (which may be taken concurrently); restricted to business majors, business combined majors, information science majors, and computer science/information science combined majors.

ORGB 3202. Organizational Behavior in a Global Context. 4 Hours.

Covers the actions and behaviors of people in organizations. Uses case studies, videos, experiential exercises, lectures, and discussions to explore the effects of individual, interpersonal, group, organizational, and cross-cultural factors on human behavior. Topics include groups and teams, motivation, leadership, organizational change, organizational culture, structure, conflict resolution, and communication. Emphasizes the social and cultural issues faced by firms that operate globally. Studies both the underlying theories and principles of these topics, as well as their practical applications and implications for organizations. Prereq. COOP 3945 (which may be taken concurrently) and sophomore standing or above; international business majors only.

ORGB 3209. Organizational Behavior. 4 Hours.

Does not count as credit for business majors. Counts as ORGB 3201 for business minors only. Prereq. Nonbusiness majors with sophomore standing or above.

ORGB 3990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

ORGB 4990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

Supply Chain Management Courses

SCHM 1990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

SCHM 2201. Supply Chain Management. 2 Hours.

Analyzes the role and activities of those involved in supply chain management decision making. Emphasizes the importance of transportation planning, inventory control, warehouse management, development of customer service standards, and procurement in the design and operation of supply and distribution systems. Attention is given to the importance of information systems and the Internet in supporting such activities. Special attention is also given to the need to develop close working relationships with managers in other functional areas including manufacturing, information systems, marketing, and international operations. This integrative approach to management is critical in supporting supply chain cost and service improvements. Prereq. Business majors and combined majors only. Coreq. MGSC 2201.

SCHM 2301. Supply Chain and Operations Management. 4 Hours.

Focuses on the integrative management of business activities intrinsic to the smooth flow of goods or services, information, and financial transactions across firms from raw materials to the end customer. This collaborative approach creates competitive advantages for all members of a supply chain. Emphasizes the responsibilities of managers regarding decisions concerning the design, operation, and control of supply chains and operations. Considers customers, globalization, corporate strategy, resources, sustainability, ethics, and diversity. Topics covered include customer-centric management; supply chain and operations strategies; process structure and control; and supply, inventory, and quality management. Emphasizes the key role of information technology, logistics network design, supply chain relationships, and process evolution. Prereq. ACCT 1201, ACCT 1202, or ACCT 1209 (any of which may be taken concurrently); business majors and combined majors only.

SCHM 2990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

SCHM 3301. Global Supply Chain Strategy. 4 Hours.

Focuses on the managerial activities of those involved in supply chain management operations and planning for companies doing international commerce. Analyzes contemporary issues that affect the design of international supply chain systems, including sourcing, logistics, transactions, risk, sustainability, and ethical considerations. Examines the current status and future prospects of the modes of international transportation as well as international trade and development issues, not only from the corporate perspective but also in terms of government policy. Prereq. SCHM 2301; business majors and combined majors only.

SCHM 3305. Sourcing and Procurement. 4 Hours.

Addresses the strategic and operational role of sourcing and procurement and its impact on the supply chain as it relates to the entire organization. In the past, the organization’s view of Sourcing and Procurement was often, “Just get me the part!” Today, sourcing and procurement—the selection, contracting, development and monitoring/managing of the right supplier in the right location—is more often a source of competitive advantage and a major contributor to a company’s bottom line. The course focuses on a variety of aspects of this function—strategy development, organization, procedures, supplier selection, negotiations, buyer-supplier relationship management, quantity, quality, timeliness and cost/price considerations for the purchase of goods and services. Prereq. (a) SCHM 2301 and (b) sophomore standing or above; business majors and combined majors only.

SCHM 3308. Supply Chain Analytics. 4 Hours.

Examines “state-of-the-art” in analytics capabilities and how they drive supply chains, from marketing to sourcing. Looks at how organizations use analytics to meet their strategic objectives, provide value to the business, and make decisions. Designed to develop strategic supply chain decision making skills using the latest analytics capabilities as an enabler. Focuses heavily on industry best practices, including looking at some of the leading companies. Prereq. SCHM 3301, SCHM 3305, or SCHM 3310; business majors and combined majors only.

SCHM 3310. Logistics and Transportation Management. 4 Hours.

Examines the logistics and transportation operations, including the structure, challenges, and potential of the major modes of domestic transportation. Focuses on the interaction between logistics providers and shippers in the marketplace. Explores the major dynamics of the logistics marketplace and their impact on supply chain management. Seeks to provide students with a managerial perspective on controlling what is typically the most expensive component of supply chain management, transportation expenditures. Prereq. SCHM 2301; business majors and combined majors only.

SCHM 3320. Demand Planning and Forecasting. 4 Hours.

Offers a practical introduction to demand (sales) planning and forecasting for business students. Focuses on the organizational processes in managing demand as well as generating a forecast, regression analysis, exponential smoothing, time-series analysis, judgmental forecasting methods, and evaluation of forecast quality. Uses real-life data and various software packages to illustrate basic concepts. Prereq. (a) SCHM 3301, SCHM 3305, or SCHM 3310 (b) business majors and combined majors only.

SCHM 3330. Sustainability and Supply Chain Management. 4 Hours.

Focuses on how to create sustainable supply chains that profitably yield high-quality, safe products without supply interruption while creating a net benefit for the employees, community, and the environment. Studies how companies measure environmental performance and use the data to motivate associates, suppliers, customers, policymakers, and the public. Also addresses the impacts of global sustainability frameworks and measures. Prereq. SCHM 3301, SCHM 3305, or SCHM 3310; business majors and combined majors only.

SCHM 3990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

SCHM 4401. Advanced Problems in Supply Chain Management. 4 Hours.

Identifies and examines important issues that are of strategic importance to executives involved in supply chain management. Emphasizes the decision-making processes and tools employed by those executives in the context of corporate strategic management. While case studies are extensively employed, there is an important independent research component to the course, and research findings are discussed with the class and shared through presentations. Also involves companies and executives from supply chain service providers. Prereq. (a) SCHM 3301, SCHM 3305, or SCHM 3310 and (b) ENGW 1111, ENGW 1102, ENGL 1111, or ENGL 1102 and (c) junior or senior standing; business majors and combined majors only.

SCHM 4970. Junior/Senior Honors Project 1. 4 Hours.

Focuses on in-depth project in which a student conducts research or produces a product related to the student’s major field. Combined with Junior/Senior Project 2 or college-defined equivalent for 8 credit honors project.

SCHM 4971. Junior/Senior Honors Project 2. 4 Hours.

Focuses on second semester of in-depth project in which a student conducts research or produces a product related to the student’s major field. Prereq. SCHM 4970.

SCHM 4990. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

SCHM 4993. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Allows students who have received approval to undertake independent study in lieu of any course required in the various concentrations. Students present proposals to an Independent Studies Committee for evaluation and approval. Every proposal requires a detailed outline of the objectives and plan of study and must be accompanied by a supporting statement from the supervising faculty member under whose direction the study takes place. A copy of the final report prepared by the student is presented to the appropriate Independent Studies Committee. Further information about the Independent Studies Program can be obtained from concentration coordinators.

SCHM 5976. Directed Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers independent work under the direction of members of the department on chosen topics. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

SCHM 5978. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Allows students who have received approval to undertake independent study in lieu of any course required in the various concentrations. Students present proposals to an Independent Studies Committee for evaluation and approval. Every proposal requires a detailed outline of the objectives and plan of study and must be accompanied by a supporting statement from the supervising faculty member under whose direction the study takes place. A copy of the final report prepared by the student is presented to the appropriate Independent Studies Committee. Further information about the Independent Studies Program can be obtained from concentration coordinators. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

Strategy Courses

STRT 4501. Strategy in Action. 4 Hours.

Provides for the integration and application of administrative theory, knowledge, skills, and experiences for effective strategic performance in an organization. Enables students to acquire a better understanding of the relevance and limitations of business and management concepts and techniques when making and implementing strategic decisions. Prereq. Business majors and combined majors only with senior standing.

STRT 4514. Internal Case Competition Challenge. 4 Hours.

Covers integration and application of theory, knowledge, skills, and experiences for effective strategic performance in an organization. Offers students an opportunity to develop strong analytical, critical-thinking, team-building, and presentation skills to prepare them for addressing business problems strategically and to present their analysis and solutions effectively, both orally and in writing. A key element of this course is participation in an internal case competition sponsored by the D’Amore-McKim School of Business. Prereq. Junior or senior standing; business majors only.

STRT 4516. External Case Competition Challenge. 4 Hours.

Covers integration and application of theory, knowledge, skills, and experiences for effective strategic performance in an organization. Offers students an opportunity to develop strong analytical, critical-thinking, team-building, and presentation skills to prepare them for addressing business problems strategically and to present their analysis and solutions effectively, both orally and in writing. A key element of this course is participation in external case competitions. Prereq. Junior or senior standing; business majors only.