School of Nursing

Website

Nancy P. Hanrahan, RN, PhD, FAAN
Professor and Dean

Janet Rico, MBA, NP-BC, PhD
Associate Clinical Professor and Assistant Dean of Graduate Nursing Programs

211 Robinson Hall
617.373.3521
617.373.2985 (fax)

Susan McDonald, Administrative Coordinator, Academic Programs, s.mcdonald@northeastern.edu

This is an exciting time in healthcare and nursing in particular. According to a recent Gallup Poll, the public ranks nursing as the “most ethical” profession. In the newly enacted healthcare legislation passed by Congress, nurses are considered the critical backbone and life force of the delivery system. What does that mean for those considering nursing as a profession? It means that as a nurse you will carry an awesome responsibility—to improve the health outcomes of patients and their families. It also means that you must be among the best prepared of health professionals. Excellent preparation is just what we seek to offer.

If you are coming to the School of Nursing to earn a master’s, PhD, or DNP, your learning will be guided by our senior faculty, nursing leaders who are expert advance practice nurses in their respective specialty areas. Our affiliation with over 100 institutions means that you and the faculty can select the best place for your clinical rotations. U.S. News & World Report ranked our nurse anesthesia graduate program in the top ten in the United States.

You want to change career pathways? We have the Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study (CAGS) that facilitates attainment of a specialty track if you already have an advanced nursing degree. You want research? We have excellent nurse researchers who are working to improve patient care and advance nursing knowledge. Come join nursing at its finest. Northeastern University is a school on the move.

Further information about the specializations can be found under the program name.

Admission Requirement

Admissions requirements are specific to the program.

Nursing Courses

NRSG 5000. Advanced Perspectives in Wellness. 4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to explore wellness through both theoretical and experiential pathways. Introduces theories and models of holism, wellness, stress, health promotion, health belief, and change as operational frameworks by which the student has an opportunity to reflect upon personal history, health and risk-taking behaviors, and lifestyle choices that influence health and well-being. Studies the art and science of self-care through both the emic and etic perspectives. Course topics include holistic lifestyle and health analysis, behavioral change, decision making, and stress/stress reduction. Embodied learning methodologies inform course delivery. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

NRSG 5100. Professional Development and Scientific Basis. 4 Hours.

Surveys current developments in the scientific basis of nursing practice. Examines physiological, psychological, sociological, and cultural perspectives that influence behavior and health responses. Emphasizes critical thinking and analysis of both lay and scientific publications. Students are encouraged to develop an individual portfolio based on core studies drawn from their professional practice. Emphasizes principles of adult learning, formulating career goals, and planning learning experiences. Encourages critical thinking, writing skills, and understanding of group processes. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

NRSG 5101. Computer and Nursing Informatics. 3 Hours.

Focuses on information and knowledge development concepts, data processing, and use of micro-, mini-, and mainframe computers in nursing practice. Introduces technologies used in nursing practice, such as hospital and nursing information system applications and decision support systems. Discusses the impact of computers and informatics on the future direction of nursing practice. Includes demonstration of computer-aided instruction, physiological monitoring devices, and applications of various software packages related to nursing practice, and the opportunity to practice computer skills. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

NRSG 5102. Public Health Nursing. 4 Hours.

Focuses on the knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary for advanced nursing practice in a variety of community-based settings. Introduces biostatistics, epidemiology, and demography as the foundation sciences of public health. Examines definitions of health and illness, considering local, regional, national, and international communities. Explores nursing roles that affect the public health in the home, at work, and especially in the community. Expands the focus of intervention from the individual to the family and the community. Provides opportunities in the field for experiential learning in the community. Prereq. NRSG 5100 and junior, senior, or graduate standing.

NRSG 5103. Cultural Diversity in Nursing Practice. 3 Hours.

Provides an opportunity to explore the implications of cultural diversity in advanced nursing practice. Examines and critiques selected theoretical perspectives including medical anthropology and sociology and ethnomethodological analysis. Considers the epidemiology of folk illnesses and ethnic differences in morbidity and mortality. Students examine their own cultural health/illness perceptions as a basis for comparing the perceptions of selected groups and those of the Western allopathic medical model. Prereq. NRSG 5100 and junior, senior, or graduate standing.

NRSG 5117. Advanced Pharmacology. 2 Hours.

Focuses on principles of pharmacology and the major drug classifications in relation to the treatment of health problems across the life span. Examines the effects of selected medications on pathophysiology and psychopathology. Emphasizes dose response, side effects/drug interactions, route of administration, and place in clinical therapy. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

NRSG 5118. Healthcare System and Professional Role Development. 3 Hours.

Examines the role of the advanced practice nurse within the context of today’s healthcare system. Focuses discussion on dimensions of the advanced practice nursing role, including intra/interdisciplinary collaboration, consultation, leadership, diversity, and accountability for quality care. Examines the healthcare system with special focus on social, political, economic, ethical, regulatory, research, and legal trends. Students are expected to evaluate the interaction between healthcare system issues and advanced practice role dimensions. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

NRSG 5120. Statistics for Health Science. 3 Hours.

Focuses on applying formal reasoning to understand the underlying principles of statistics; how to select and conduct statistical tests; and how to interpret and use the results of data analysis in relation to research questions and research hypotheses. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

NRSG 5121. Epidemiology and Population Health. 3 Hours.

Examines the theoretical basis for identification and analysis of the distribution and determinants of health problems at community, national, and international population levels. Considers health disparities that exist among specific populations and the role of government in setting policies for health promotion and disease prevention. Covers three topical areas: basic principles and population measures of epidemiology; epidemiologic study methods; and application of epidemiologic tools in interdisciplinary settings. Complements planned topics with current examples of population health issues. The goal is to understand the principles and practice of monitoring population health. Skills acquired assist advanced practice nurses, other clinicians, or administrators in critically evaluating new epidemiologic literature and in using the basic tools of epidemiology to assess population health and develop strategies for monitoring health improvement. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

NRSG 5126. Pathophysiology for Advanced Practice. 3 Hours.

Covers content that provides current understanding of major disease processes across the life span. Builds on the knowledge of anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, microbiology, and immunology. Focuses on physiologic dysfunction; physiologic adaptation in maintaining the internal environment; and feedback mechanisms at the cellular, organ, and systems level. Seeks to provide students with a way of thinking about disease for each body system. Provides a comprehensive study of underlying concepts common to major pathophysiologic processes of the body, including specific diseases affecting the cardiovascular, endocrine, gastrointestinal, hematological, immunological, nervous, pulmonary, and renal systems. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

NRSG 5127. Scientific Inquiry and Epidemiological Concepts. 3 Hours.

Emphasizes methods of scientific inquiry and epidemiological concepts relative to individual and population health. Addresses multiculturalism concepts relative to health and illness. Stresses theoretical frameworks, methods of inquiry, and appropriate use of selected statistical analyses. Offers students an opportunity to analyze data to improve healthcare delivery for individuals and populations. Examines threats to internal and external validity. Emphasizes critical appraisal of literature as evidence as a basis for translation into practice. Explores strategies and tools for retrieval, compilation, critical appraisal, and application of empirical and practice-based information. Prereq. USAGPAN students only.

NRSG 5170. Statistics in Nursing. 2 Hours.

Part of the USAGPAN program. This course provides students the opportunity to understand biostatistics and their application in scientific research. Students conduct a systematic inquiry relative to an identified anesthesia problem, conduct a research study, and apply the appropriate statistical measurement to analyze the data. In addition, the statistical foundation obtained from this course will enable students to critically analyze scientific literature. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing; USAGPAN students only.

NRSG 5172. Clinical Anatomy and Physiology 1 for Nurse Anesthesia. 6 Hours.

Part of the USAGPAN program. This course provides students the opportunity to study the anatomy and physiology of the cell, muscle, nervous, and cardiovascular systems with particular reference to their applicability to anesthesia and acute care management. Students engage in critical thinking regarding the effects of anesthetics on physiological processes and its relation to their client’s state of health/wellness as it interacts with culturally diverse populations in the 21st century. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing; USAGPAN students only.

NRSG 5174. Clinical Anatomy and Physiology 2 for Nurse Anesthesia. 5 Hours.

Part of the USAGPAN program. This course provides students the opportunity to build upon their knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the endocrine, respiratory, and renal systems with particular reference to anesthesia, respiratory, and acute care management. Students engage in critical thinking regarding the effects of anesthesia on the normal physiological processes of the respiratory, endocrine, and renal systems. Prereq. NRSG 5172 with a grade of B; junior, senior, or graduate standing; USAGPAN students only.

NRSG 5176. Theoretical and Research Applications in Nurse Anesthesia. 3 Hours.

Part of the USAGPAN program. This course investigates the philosophical and theoretical bases underlying concepts and operations inherent in nursing. Theories from behavioral, natural, applied, and nursing sciences are examined. Theoretical frameworks and concepts are explored as a foundation for research relative to practice of nursing anesthesia. This course focuses on the research process from problem formulation to analysis and interpretation. Emphasizes is on research designs, methods, and appropriate use of selected statistical analyses. Critique of research is also explored. Students have the opportunity to input and analyze data using SPSS. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing; USAGPAN students only.

NRSG 5178. Information Systems in Advanced Nursing Practice. 2 Hours.

Part of the USAGPAN program. This course focuses on the methods and tools of information handling relative to selected aspects of anesthesia nursing, healthcare, education, and research. The process of organizing, collecting, processing, and analyzing of data is explored as a basis for clinical decision-making. Automation of communication, manuscript/proposal preparation, databases, and budgeting are emphasized. The integration of Word, SPSS, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint are explored. Computer-based resources including word processing, presentation software, bibliographic software, search engines and databases are used to assist in acquisition, maintenance, and presentation of information in a scholarly format. Research findings in the use of informatics are addressed. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing; USAGPAN students only.

NRSG 5180. Evaluation and Application of Research in Advanced Nursing Practice. 4 Hours.

Part of the USAGPAN program. This course provides students the opportunity to integrate theory, research and practice. Students conduct a systematic inquiry relative to an identified anesthesia problem. Specifically, the students design and implement a research protocol. This process provides experience in research design, implementation, and evaluation. Students submit a manuscript of the research to a refereed journal and present either a podium or a poster presentation at national meeting. Prereq. NRSG 5176 and NRSG 5178 and junior, senior, or graduate standing; USAGPAN students only.

NRSG 5182. Physical Examination and Differential Diagnosis. 4 Hours.

Part of the USAGPAN program. This course provides students the opportunity to refine and specialize their assessment skills with an emphasis on assessing for the presence and quantifying the severity of problems with significant implications for anesthesia care. Particular attention is paid to the importance of consulting appropriately for preoperative optimization and the development of plans for anesthesia care that minimize anesthesia related risk. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing; USAGPAN students only.

NRSG 5184. Biochemistry for Nurse Anesthesia. 4 Hours.

Part of the USAGPAN program. A graduate level course which provides the student an opportunity to correlate biochemical principles as they apply to the physiology, pathophysiology, and pharmacology of anesthesia nursing. Major topics covered include: (1) structure and function of DNA, RNA and proteins; (2) basic medical genetics; (3) protein structure and function; (4) common metabolic pathways of carbohydrates, lipids, and amino acids; and (5) special topics including clinical chemistry. Lectures are supplemented by case studies and clinical correlate presentations related to anesthesia. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing; USAGPAN students only.

NRSG 5976. Directed Study. 1-4 Hours.

Allows student to develop an individualized plan to attain specific knowledge and skills related to professional goals. May consist of library study and reading, individual instruction, research, practicum, or other appropriate activity as approved by instructor and academic adviser. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

NRSG 5978. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers independent work under the direction of members of the department on a chosen topic. Course content depends on instructor. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

NRSG 5984. Research. 1-4 Hours.

Offers an opportunity to conduct research under faculty supervision. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

NRSG 6115. Health Assessment. 3 Hours.

Focuses on human physiology and the development of advanced health assessment knowledge and skills related to performing regional and comprehensive examinations of the client across the life span. Includes variables among cultural groups. Students synthesize knowledge from nursing, physical, social, and health sciences as they analyze data collected in the assessment process. Focuses on interviewing skills and systematic performance, analysis and documentation of health assessment process. Differentiation of normal and abnormal findings is emphasized utilizing critical thinking. Introduces the student to diagnostic reasoning within the scope of practice of the nurse in the advanced practice role. Nursing degree students only.

NRSG 6116. Advanced Health Assessment of the Neonate and Infant. 3 Hours.

Focuses on human physiology and the development of advanced health assessment skills to build a knowledge base with which to perform a thorough assessment and examination of the neonate and infant. Offers students an opportunity to learn to evaluate family history through chart review and direct interviewing to gain knowledge of the neonate and to anticipate certain findings based on information gained through a thorough assessment and physical examination. Emphasizes identifying normal from abnormal findings through critical thinking, introducing the student to diagnostic reasoning, which is the basis of the advance practice nurse role. Prereq. Nursing students only.

NRSG 6122. Theory and Practice of Nursing Research. 4 Hours.

Addresses the development of nursing science. Emphasizes the relationship between theory building and research for the discipline and advanced nursing practice. Requires students to complete an in-depth analysis of the research process and apply this analysis in the evaluation of published research reports related to healthcare. Topics include evidence-based practice, knowledge development and the scientific method, ethics, literature reviews, qualitative and quantitative approaches to research, research designs, sampling, data collection methods, reliability and validity of data-gathering procedures, computer utilization and data processing, statistical applications, analysis of findings, and utilization of research results. Aims course activities at assisting students to develop skills as an active participant of a clinically based research project and as a leader in the utilization of research to improve nursing practice. Prereq. Knowledge of statistics; nursing degree students only.

NRSG 6124. Research Applications. 1 Hour.

Provides the opportunity for graduate nursing students to work individually or in groups of two with an experienced researcher in an area related to their clinical specialization or other professional interest. The student’s individual contribution depends on the stage of the research project and is determined jointly by the student, faculty liaison, and researcher. Evaluation includes the student’s individual effort, participation in the collaborative research process, and appraisal of the learning experience as a research assistant. By participating in an established, scientifically significant project, the student has an opportunity to experience actively the real-life aspects of conducting research. Additionally, the student is socialized to the role of the nurse researcher. Prereq. NRSG 6122 with a grade of B; nursing students with graduate standing only; not open to graduate special students in Bouvé College.

NRSG 6200. Theories of Health Behavior. 3 Hours.

Focuses on health illness, sickness, and disability from nursing, sociological, cultural, ecological, and medical perspectives. Examines concepts, theories, and models that explain health-related behaviors. Explores the empirical foundations of interventions designed to promote health and prevent disease for the individuals living in the community, with emphasis on access for populations at risk across the life span.

NRSG 6201. Theories of Family Health. 3 Hours.

Examines theoretical bases for understanding and promoting family-focused practice. Family theory frameworks and models developed by nursing and related disciplines are discussed and critically analyzed for application to advanced practice. Topics include family system response and family impact on health and illness across the life span and contemporary social issues, cultural factors, and health policy affecting family health.

NRSG 6202. Advanced Nursing Research. 3 Hours.

Specifically designed for students who choose to complete a master’s thesis, this course may be taken as an elective offering for nonthesis students. It is the second course in the graduate research sequence. Requires the student to complete an in-depth analysis of the research process and apply it to the development of a research proposal. Topics include methods and procedures for implementing a research plan, sampling techniques, methods for data collection, reliability and validity of norm-referenced and criterion-referenced measures, computer utilization and data processing, statistical applications, analysis of findings, and dissemination and utilization of nursing research. Offers students the opportunity to gain experience in computerized data analysis and the use of SPSS software package. Aimed at assisting students to finalize their research proposal. Prereq. NRSG 5122.

NRSG 6210. Holistic Healing and Integrative Health. 3 Hours.

Examines integrative healthcare, which includes a variety of healing modalities and therapies. Designed to define health and to investigate modalities that complement Western medicine. Topics include (1) herbal medicine, (2) diet, nutrition, and lifestyle changes, (3) mind/body or behavioral interventions, (4) alternative systems of medical practice, (5) manual healing methods, (6) bioelectromagnetics, and (7) pharmacologic and biologic treatments. Defines and presents these approaches and therapies from a historical, philosophical, practical, and research perspective. Investigates a variety of healing approaches. Students become familiar with current leaders and philosophies in the area of integrative healthcare.

NRSG 6211. Energy-Based Healing Modalities. 3 Hours.

Identifies and discusses the principles and practices of energy-based healing therapies. In addition to a variety of energy techniques, specific investigation is given to acupuncture, cranial sacral work, massage, polarity therapy, reiki, and therapeutic touch. Students experience, review, and research one specific modality of energy healing. Students develop knowledge and skills in energy-based modalities and understand and develop strategies to integrate them within their lives.

NRSG 6212. Programs in Integrative Healthcare. 3 Hours.

Provides students with an opportunity to work with integrative healthcare practitioners. Each student may become certified or licensed through one of the licensing agencies or certification processes within integrative healthcare and practice as a clinician within the area.

NRSG 6213. International Health. 3 Hours.

Explores various dimensions of international health, with emphasis on the impact on globalization on world health. Examines the financial base for healthcare in representative nations to identify common themes and specific problem areas. Major assaults on health caused by natural disasters and war are assessed in relation to the response of the world community to public health issues. Examines implications and opportunities for specific health professions.

NRSG 6220. Nursing Management: Acute Episodic Illness. 3 Hours.

Addresses the assessment, preventive, and health maintenance theories of healthcare utilized by the acute-care advanced practice nurse. Includes common problems causing episodic and acute illnesses and the advanced nursing management skills needed to address them and implement initial management skills. Uses current theories and research from nursing and the physical and behavioral sciences as a basis for clinical decision making, with an emphasis on critical thinking and diagnostic reasoning. The nursing process and life cycle are integral frameworks used to structure the delivery of course content. Prereq. NRSG 5117, NRSG 5126, and NRSG 6115, each with a grade of B; restricted to selected nursing programs or permission of instructor. Coreq. NRSG 6420.

NRSG 6221. Nursing Management: Critical and Chronic Illness. 3 Hours.

Emphasizes the acquisition of theoretical knowledge essential to understanding the common life-threatening and chronic, long-term pathophysiological problems, differential diagnosis, and related advanced nursing care of critically and chronically ill individuals and families. Addresses common problems causing critical, life-threatening illnesses, the chronic sequelae from these problems, and the advanced nursing management skills needed to address them. Uses current theories and research from nursing and the physical and behavioral sciences as a basis for clinical decision making, with an emphasis on critical thinking and diagnostic reasoning. The nursing process and life cycle are integral frameworks used to structure the delivery of course content. Prereq. NRSG 6220 with a grade of B; restricted to selected nursing programs or permission of instructor. Coreq. NRSG 6421.

NRSG 6222. Pharmacology of Adults and Older Adults. 2 Hours.

Covers age-related changes in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics and the prescription, administration, and monitoring of medications for older adults. Includes a detailed discussion of the most common drugs and classes of drugs prescribed for the elderly, as well as the signs and symptoms of drug toxicity particular to older adults. Investigates the impact of race/ethnicity on prescribing practices. Also discusses medication history guidelines for older adults, age-related considerations in prescribing for the elderly, and methods to support drug compliance and prevent inappropriate drug use and adverse drug reactions. Examines over-the-counter drug use among older adults. Emphasis is on the problem of polypharmacy for the older adult and the prevention, recognition, and treatment of drug interactions among older adults. Prereq. NRSG 5117 with a grade of B.

NRSG 6226. Strategies for Education, Staff Development, and Consultation. 3 Hours.

Focuses on major concepts of teaching and learning for the adult learner, principles and practices of staff development, and roles of consultation and collaboration. Examines the concepts of leadership, collaboration, and consultation as they relate to the advanced practice role of the clinical nurse specialist. Analyzes the influences of organizational systems, finances, and culture as components of the advanced practice role. Students are expected to learn and apply an evidence-based approach to managing complex healthcare issues that includes policies, procedures and protocols, and best-practice models. Assignments focus on helping students gain expertise in presenting, consulting, teaching, and writing. Offers students an opportunity to integrate advanced assessment techniques and parameters of critical thinking to solve problems related to the care of patients in acute-care settings.

NRSG 6230. Nursing Management: Critically Ill Neonatal 1. 3 Hours.

Focuses on the acquisition of knowledge about complex physiological concepts essential to the care of the critically ill neonate. Begins with the actual and potential alterations in fetal/neonatal well-being, adaptation to extrauterine life, and factors that interfere with adaptation to extrauterine life. Also emphasizes the acquisition of theoretical knowledge essential to understanding the neonate’s response to life-threatening problems. Discusses neonatal pathophysiologic disorders in terms of the nursing process and management of the neonate and their families. Uses current theories and research from nursing, biomedical, physical, and behavioral sciences as a basis for clinical decision making. The nursing process and developmental theory are frameworks utilized to structure the delivery of course content.

NRSG 6231. Nursing Management: Critically Ill Neonatal 2. 3 Hours.

Continues NRSG 6230. Covers the acquisition of theoretical knowledge essential to understanding the neonate’s response to life-threatening problems. Discusses neonatal pathophysiologic disorders in terms of the nursing process and management of the neonate and their families. Uses current theories and research from nursing, biomedical, physical, and behavioral sciences as a basis for clinical decision making. The nursing process and developmental theory are frameworks utilized to structure the delivery of course content. Prereq. NRSG 6230 with a grade of B.

NRSG 6232. Neonatal Pharmacology. 2 Hours.

Focuses on building upon basic knowledge in pharmacology and providing content essential for nurses in the expanded role. Examines the principles of pharmacology and major drug classifications as they relate to the causes and treatment of health and illness problems affecting critically ill neonates. Prereq. NRSG 5117 with a grade of B.

NRSG 6240. Nursing Management: Immunosuppressed Patient. 3 Hours.

Explores the relationship between the immune response and pathophysiologic dysfunctions in the critically ill. Utilizing an established knowledge base of physiologic processes and clinical concepts, focuses on current research and theories of immunologic competence, immunomodulated therapies, and the clinical sequelae of the critically ill immunosuppressed patients.

NRSG 6241. Acute-Care Concepts in Nursing Practice. 3 Hours.

Focuses on the analysis and application of core physiological, behavioral, environmental, and psychosocial concepts essential for advanced nursing care of acute and critically ill individuals. Topics include the utility and clinical implications of monitoring technology available in the acute-care setting, the acute-care environment and its impact on patient and family systems, and the concepts of stress, grief, and coping. Also addresses the advanced nursing management of the multiple trauma patient and the related physiologic and clinical concepts. Opportunity is provided for exploration and development of concepts unique to each student’s area of concentration within the acute-care specialization. Prereq. NRSG 6221 with a grade of B; restricted to selected nursing programs or permission of instructor. Coreq. NRSG 6422.

NRSG 6242. Pharmacotherapeutics of the Critically Ill. 2 Hours.

Focuses on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in the care of individuals with critical, life-threatening illnesses. The prescription, administration, and monitoring of medications for the critically ill serves as the organizing framework for the course. Includes the most common drugs and classes of drugs prescribed for the critically ill, the signs and symptoms of drug toxicity, and interventions utilized to resolve adverse drug reactions. Also addresses the impact of polypharmacy. Routes of medication delivery in the critical-care setting are examined, analyzed, and evaluated. Prereq. NRSG 5117.

NRSG 6244. Ethical Issues in Aging, Multicultural Society. 3 Hours.

Identifies cultural competency as a critical tool for improving the healthcare of older adults. Discusses the demographics of cultural diversity among older adults. Covers personal cultural competency skills, the tension between Western medicine and individual patient belief systems, and the challenge of responding to the linguistic and cultural needs in the acute-care setting. Considers the applicability of the traditional Western medico-ethical principles of autonomy, beneficence, nonmalfeasance, and justice to ethical problems encountered by healthcare providers caring for older adults of diverse racial, ethnic, and religious backgrounds. Emphasizes recognition of true ethical dilemmas, identification of central issues, gathering of necessary and appropriate information, and rational decision making. Considers contemporary ethical questions.

NRSG 6249. Health Promotion of Adult/Older Adult. 3 Hours.

Focuses on the assessment, preventative, and health maintenance and promotion theories utilized by advanced practice nurses. Includes the impact of political, psychological, sociological, and physiological factors on the healthcare continua of the adolescent/adult/older adult. Explores self-modeling of health behaviors and institution of primary and secondary preventative strategies in the home, community, workplace, and primary care facility. Discusses and utlizes theoretical and strategic approaches to behavior change necessary for health promotion. Prereq. NRSG 6115 with a grade of B. Coreq. NRSG 6449.

NRSG 6253. Primary Care of Adult/Older Adult Health Problems. 4 Hours.

Building upon NRSG 6252, seeks to further develop the intellectual and attitudinal competencies necessary for successful performance as a primary healthcare provider. Focuses on assessment, diagnosis, and management of adolescents/adults/older adults with minor acute and stabilized chronic illness in the community and long-term care facility. Emphasizes the nurse practitioner role functions of collaborative interdisciplinary management, consultation, and referral skills. Prereq. NRSG 6249 with a grade of B.

NRSG 6254. Primary Care of Adult/Older Adult Complex Patients. 4 Hours.

Focuses on the assessment and intervention of adults/older adults with complex multisystem health problems/diseases in primary care and long-term care settings. Utilizes knowledge from pathophysiology, pharmacology, and psychosocial sciences to increase knowledge and skill of the advanced practice nurse in the care of adults/older adults with complex problems. Teaches students about the role and expertise of advanced practice nurses and other professionals in diverse settings. Prereq. NRSG 6253.

NRSG 6255. Family Nurse Practitioner Practicum 1. 3 Hours.

Offers a clinical learning experience that correlates with the content presented in NRSG 6266. Focuses on assessment and intervention with the families across the life span within a holistic framework. Emphasizes identification of families at risk for premature morbidity and mortality. Focuses on advanced health-assessment techniques and interpretation of abnormal findings on physical examination. Also focuses on developing a client/family health-promoting plan of care within the advanced practice role of the nurse practitioner. Specific clinical activities focus on the care of pregnant women. Prereq. Nursing students only.

NRSG 6256. Family Nurse Practitioner Practicum 2. 3 Hours.

Seeks to provide clinical learning experiences in the delivery and coordination of comprehensive pediatric care, including, but not limited to, well-child care, episodic care, chronic care, and urgent care. Focuses on performing a comprehensive health assessment of the child and family within the urban community utilizing an evidence-based and culturally competent approach. Emphasizes health promotion, health maintenance, and protection, as well as identification of children and families at risk. Requires students to practice in the clinical setting a minimum of twenty hours per week. Prereq. NRSG 6255; nursing students only.

NRSG 6257. Family Nurse Practitioner Practicum 3. 3 Hours.

Seeks to provide clinical learning experiences in the coordination and delivery of care to infants, children, adolescents, and young adults, and their families, within the context of their culture and urban community. Continued clinical practice experiences across settings and continuum of care offer an opportunity to develop knowledge, attitudinal competencies, and skills in the delivery of care to children, with a focus on acute and chronic health issues. Offers students an opportunity to learn to assess, diagnose, and manage chronic conditions and acute illnesses commonly encountered in childhood, adolescence, and young adulthood and to build on a foundation of practice behaviors in health assessment, health promotion, and disease prevention. Emphasizes urban health. Requires students to practice in the clinical setting a minimum of twenty hours per week. Prereq. NRSG 6256; nursing students only.

NRSG 6262. Pediatric Pharmacology. 2 Hours.

Focuses on the principles of pharmacology and the major drug classifications in relation to the treatment of health problems during childhood and adolescence. Examines the effects of selected medications on pathophysiology and psychopathology. Discusses the implication of practice. Prereq. NRSG 5117 with a grade of B.

NRSG 6264. Care of Well Child/Adolescent Health Promotion. 4 Hours.

Focuses on the health assessment on newborns, well children, adolescents, and their families within a community. Discusses issues most pertinent to the various ages of the well child within a community-based primary care framework of anticipatory guidance and health promotion. Emphasizes the utilization of a comprehensive approach to preventative healthcare by examining the impact of psychological, sociological, developmental, behavioral, cultural, and physiological factors on the child’s health status within the family and community. Includes routine healthcare maintenance, screening, developmental issues, genetic implications, family dynamics, confidentiality, self-care, and common health concerns encountered in primary care settings. Prereq. NRSG 5115 with a grade of B or NRSG 6115 with a grade of B.

NRSG 6265. Care of Child/Adolescent Health Problems. 4 Hours.

Builds upon the knowledge and skills gained in NRSG 6264. Seeks to further develop within the student the intellectual and attitudinal competencies necessary to successfully perform as a primary healthcare provider. Focuses on acute and chronic health problems seen in infants through young adults, Encompasses assessment, diagnosis, and management of children with acute and stabilized chronic illness, genetic and reproductive health issues, nutritional concerns, dermatology, sports and activity-related injuries, and perinatal care. Considers family, cultural, and community context. Emphasizes the nurse practitioner role, including the development of consultation and referral skills. Prereq. NRSG 6260 with a grade of B.

NRSG 6266. Family Theory and Primary Care in the Childbearing Years. 4 Hours.

Building on the knowledge of the health-assessment process and primary care concepts, the FNP student has an opportunity to learn to provide family focused primary care bridging the content learned in the adult and pediatric courses. Emphasizes integration of the assessment and management of the changing structure of the family unit throughout the childbearing years into the role of the family nurse practitioner. Applies this knowledge in a clinical learning experience where prenatal and postnatal care is provided to families. Prereq. NRSG 6115.

NRSG 6267. Care of the Critically Ill Child. 4 Hours.

Using a combined didactic and clinical approach, examines the specific issues in the care of children with critical conditions. Designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills necessary to meet the unique needs of fragile children, including urban children who are at risk for poor health outcomes. Offers students clinical experience caring for these children. Prereq. NRSG 6264 and NRSG 6461.

NRSG 6275. Urban Families at Risk: A Primary Care Approach. 4 Hours.

Integrates academic and clinical learning into a unique collaborative experience, which affords students the opportunity to explore emerging trends and patterns of healthcare practices in the urban setting. Urban healthcare poses multiple challenges to nurses, including the need to master new skills and competencies and to understand the complex needs of these communities. Primary care providers need to be aware of the social and environmental context of children and their families. Examines the broad issues in the primary healthcare of identified, underrepresented urban groups: lesbians, women and children with HIV, homeless and abused women and children. Mentors students in both the classroom and clinical settings to explore current issues inherent in caring for underserved populations in urban settings through utilization of innovative strategies. Prereq. NRSG 6115 with a grade of B.

NRSG 6281. Dimensions of Clinical Practice. 3 Hours.

Focuses on psychodiagnostic history taking, mental status evaluation, psychodynamic treatment formulations, and designs of psychiatric treatment contracts for various aged clients. Studies the major forms of psychopathology, clinical theory, and the use of the DSM IV-R to make decisions for clients across the life span. Emphasizes supportive and insight-oriented approaches in dynamic therapy, and addresses prevention and treatment approaches for populations at risk. Identifies outcome indicators and describes goal-setting strategies.

NRSG 6282. Clinical Psychopharmacology. 3 Hours.

Provides comprehensive overview of major classes of psychotropic medications and the related psychiatric disorders associated with medication prescription. Emphasizes clinical nursing decision making related to choice of medication, differential diagnosis and drug interactions, safe monitoring with attention to side effects, and integration of medication management into a treatment regimen for various patient populations. Prereq. NRSG 5117 with a grade of B.

NRSG 6283. Psychobiological Bases of Mental Disorders. 3 Hours.

Focuses on major psychiatric disorders across the life span as identified in the DSM IV manual. Studies the central and autonomic nervous systems, stress-response syndrome, neurotransmitter activity, and neuroendocrine immune interactions. Reviews the biological base of mental disorders, and addresses the use of biological interventions in symptom reduction. Also reviews the psychiatric complications of physical illness and common physical disorders to rule out psychiatric conditions. Emphasizes the integration of biological with psychosocial approaches to treatment of mental disorders.

NRSG 6284. Psychopathology of Childhood. 3 Hours.

Emphasizes psychopathological disorders throughout the developmental phases of infancy, early childhood, latency, and adolescence. Focuses on diagnostic process and treatment planning for intervention. Uses psychodynamic theorists and discusses interactional, behavioral, and neurological models related to assessment, treatment, and prevention. Considers psychotherapeutic and psychopharmocological work with children, families, and communities.

NRSG 6285. Mental Health of Adolescents. 3 Hours.

Focuses on assessment and therapeutic management of adolescent mental health problems. Includes adolescent suicide, self-destructive behavior, incest, drug and alcohol abuse, acting-out behavior, violence, and psychosis. Explores psychodynamic concepts, psychiatric referral process, and issues related to treatment and placement in the community.

NRSG 6286. Contemporary Psychotherapies—Theory and Practice. 3 Hours.

Introduces the theory and practice of various forms of psychotherapy. Discusses theory and techniques associated with each therapy with regard to theoretical underpinnings, therapeutic action, techniques, relationship between therapist and patient, and application to different diagnostic populations. Uses lecture and seminar format to present material and case data to illustrate different psychotherapeutic perspectives. Prereq. NRSG 6281; Bouvé students only.

NRSG 6287. Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology. 2 Hours.

Provides a comprehensive overview of major classes of psychotropic medications for pediatric populations. Relates psychiatric disorders associated with medication prescription, differential diagnosis and drug interactions, safe monitoring with attention to side effects, and integration of medication management into a treatment regimen for various patient populations. Uses clinical cases to illustrate complex issues related to prescribing psychiatric medications for children.

NRSG 6288. Geriatric and Aging Adult Psychopharmacology. 2 Hours.

Offers a comprehensive overview of psychiatric disorders and the biopsychosocial issues associated with medication prescription, differential diagnosis, drug interactions, and safe monitoring with attention to side effects for geriatric and aging adult populations. Also offers a comprehensive overview of major classes of psychotropic medications and integration of medication management into a treatment regimen for geriatric and aging adult clients. Uses clinical cases to illustrate complex issues related to prescribing psychiatric medications for the geriatric population. Prereq. Bouvé students only.

NRSG 6300. Healthcare Finance and Marketing. 3 Hours.

Covers healthcare economics and the financial and marketing functions and responsibilities of healthcare leaders. Emphasizes the decision-making process involved in assuring financial management and management of the exchange process between an organization and its “publics” by which both parties satisfy their needs and wants (marketing). Focuses on the integration of clinical and business aspects of healthcare into decision making for the advanced practice nurse leader.

NRSG 6301. Human Resources and Operations. 3 Hours.

Studies the essential practice of human resource management within healthcare organizations with a focus on leading and managing a professional nursing workforce. Quality healthcare is dependent on the availability and retention of adequate numbers of sufficiently educated and competent nurses and nonprofessional healthcare personnel. Examines the strategic management of a professional nursing and nonnursing healthcare workforce from many perspectives, including theoretical concepts relevant to human resource management in complex systems; legal and regulatory considerations; trends in nursing workforce supply/demand and composition; professional practice and participatory governance models; workplace diversity; collective bargaining; healthy work environment; and relational skill development, including conflict management. Discusses implications for nurse leaders within varying levels in the organization/system. Prereq. NRSG 6302.

NRSG 6302. Health Policy and Law. 3 Hours.

Examines health policy and health laws by advanced practice nurses from the perspective of issues pertinent to public health, populations, communities, their healthcare, and its coordination. Reviews and criticizes court decisions, legislation, federal, and state regulatory activities relevant to healthcare and health policy initiatives. Discusses the concept of continuous quality improvement through the development of standards of care and evaluation outcomes. Explores healthcare as a vital part of a national care agenda. Concepts are presented for application through the manager-as-developer model, which includes influence, vision, two-way communication, autonomy, team building, and development.

NRSG 6303. Nursing and Business. 2 Hours.

Provides an opportunity for graduate students to explore the issues that arise at the interface of business and healthcare. Focuses on the role of the manager in the organizations and rapidly changing environments of healthcare. In an interdisciplinary seminar, students examine different and sometimes contrasting organizational frameworks, cultures, and values from the perspectives of business and nursing. Emphasizes the primary skills and competencies that are critical for the manager to identify and deal with complex management problems in healthcare. A healthcare business plan is created.

NRSG 6305. Case Management. 3 Hours.

Considers case management as a strategy used in healthcare organizations to manage clinical and financial risk related to patient care at the individual and population levels. Examines the roles, responsibilities, multidisciplinary interactions, and accountability of case managers in a variety of healthcare settings. Emphasizes program evaluation and research. Compares the purpose, concepts, and types of case management models in the contemporary healthcare environment from utilization review/discharge planning through venue-specific clinical models to health and disease management programs. Discusses the effects of program design on effective outcomes of care and efficient resource use in the context of realistic expectations and best clinical practice.

NRSG 6306. Health Informatics. 3 Hours.

Seeks to prepare students to use information systems and technology to support and improve patient care and healthcare systems. Examines the meta-structures (data, information, knowledge, and wisdom), concepts and tools of nursing, and healthcare informatics. Focuses on information literacy, including a critical examination of both electronic patient health information and provider decision support resources. Covers ethical and legal issues, including privacy and security, related to electronic systems. Database concepts, including data mining, warehousing, electronic data collection, and aggregation for research and patient care, are important components of this course. Examines the role of the nurse as a change agent during health information technology implementation. Prereq. Nursing, pharmacy, and pharmacy studies students only or permission of instructor.

NRSG 6307. Operational Informatics in Healthcare Organizations. 3 Hours.

Expands on NRSG 6306. Covers theoretical, empirical, and practical knowledge and skills for effective strategic and operational informatics nursing leadership. Specific topics address systemwide change management and leadership particular to information technology; the interpretation and application of key metrics for evaluating health information systems (HIS); and the selection, assessment, design, building, testing, implementation, evaluation, and promotion of evolving HIS within healthcare organizations (HCOs). Finally, examines the strategic role of executive nursing leadership within HCOs and emerging informatics needs in analytics and reporting to evaluate health outcomes. Prereq. NRSG 6306 with a grade of B; nursing, pharmacy, and pharmacy studies students only or permission of instructor.

NRSG 6308. Healthcare Management. 3 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to prepare for their future roles as managers within a healthcare delivery system. Examines the founding principles and dynamics of healthcare management and the healthcare system. Explores the basic concepts and skills in administration. Analyzes management issues that distinguish health services organizations from other types of organizations and strategies for dealing with these issues. Prereq. USAGPAN students only.

NRSG 6310. Nurse/Healthcare Entrepreneur. 3 Hours.

Provides graduate students with the theoretical foundation to do business planning. This process is examined from a nurse/healthcare entrepreneur perspective. Identifies strategies for achieving business goals in nursing/healthcare. Emphasis is on actualizing a winning business plan in nursing/healthcare through step-by-step approach with a strong focus on marketing, planning, and financial analysis.

NRSG 6320. Role/Practice Issues in Nurse Anesthesia. 3 Hours.

Focuses on the development and current trends in nurse anesthesia practice, education, and research. Includes the historical, legal, legislative, and professional role issues associated with advanced practice anesthesia nursing. Emphasizes professional responsibilities, ethical issues, diversity, cultural competency, quality assurance, continuing education, and professional involvement.

NRSG 6321. Conceptual Basis of Nurse Anesthesia Practice 1. 3 Hours.

Covers fundamental knowledge and skills for entry into advanced practice anesthesia nursing. Includes assessment, essential techniques, monitoring and equipment, pharmacologic interventions, and safe practice across the life span. Prereq. NRSG 6324 with a grade of B. Coreq. NRSG 6530.

NRSG 6322. Conceptual Basis of Nurse Anesthesia Practice 2. 3 Hours.

Continues NRSG 6321 with in-depth knowledge and skills of highly specialized problems and conditions requiring anesthesia or surgical interventions. Includes assessment, techniques, planning, and pharmacologic intervention for patients with disorders of the cardiovascular and pulmonary systems across the life span. Prereq. NRSG 6321, NRSG 6325, and NRSG 6530, each with a grade of B. Coreq. NRSG 6534.

NRSG 6324. Chemistry and Physics in Anesthesia. 3 Hours.

Reviews organic functional group chemistry and introduces the principles of medicinal chemistry; provides a foundation for the in-depth study of drugs, including intravenous agents and anesthetic adjuncts. Focuses discussions on physics and technology in anesthesia practice, gas laws, biotransformation of anesthetics, pharmacology of anesthetics and adjuncts, and recent development in general anesthetic agents. Prereq. Nurse anesthesiologist majors only.

NRSG 6325. Pharmacotherapeutics in Anesthesia and Critical Care Nursing. 2 Hours.

Concentrates on the mechanisms of action common to many pharmacotherapeutic agents. Helps to increase students’ understanding of general principles of drug actions, interactions, and side effects, especially related to the administration of anesthesia. Includes content of dose-effect relationship, pharmacokinetics, drug allergy, pharmacogenetics, and teratogenic side effects. Consists of lectures, discussions, assignments, and examinations. Requires a presentation of a short paper on a selected topic. Prereq. NRSG 5117 with a grade of B.

NRSG 6333. Conceptual Basis of Nurse Anesthesia Practice 3. 3 Hours.

Covers in-depth knowledge and skills of highly specialized problems and conditions requiring anesthesia or surgical interventions. Includes assessment, techniques; planning; and pharmacologic intervention for patients with disorders of the nervous, endocrine, renal, and hepatic systems across the life span. Coreq. NRSG 6535.

NRSG 6336. Advanced Concepts in Nurse Anesthesia Practice. 3 Hours.

Covers in-depth knowledge and skills of highly specialized problems and conditions requiring anesthesia or surgical interventions. Includes assessment, techniques, planning, and pharmacologic intervention for regional anesthesia, pain management, care of obstetrical patients, transplantation surgery, and patients with catastrophic condition. Prereq. NRSG 6333 and NRSG 6535, each with a grade of B. Coreq. NRSG 6540.

NRSG 6340. Curriculum Development in Nursing. 3 Hours.

Focuses on curriculum development in nursing education. Includes history of nursing education, learning theories, criteria for programs in higher education, curriculum designs, and testing and evaluation methods. Examines values, trends, and issues in contemporary nursing education.

NRSG 6341. Teaching Nursing: The Art and Science. 3 Hours.

Explores various learning theories and their application to practice disciplines. Emphasis is on efforts to enhance critical thinking and problem solving, with assessment of technological aids for learning. Examines teaching modalities as they are related to increasing levels of complexity of information, and offers an introduction to the assessment of teaching effectiveness.

NRSG 6342. Educational Evaluation in Nursing. 2 Hours.

Introduces professional accreditation practices including the assessment of program outcomes. Testing and clinical evaluation of student learning are integral to the course. Provides the opportunity to develop evaluation tools including examinations.

NRSG 6344. Healthcare Quality Improvement. 3 Hours.

Focuses on critical issues related to healthcare quality improvement (QI) and nursing leadership to promote safe, timely, effective, efficient, equitable, and patient-centered care and services. Examines the science of improvement from many perspectives including current national reports, trends, and initiatives; standards, culture of safety, patient and staff safety; QI models, measurement, methods, and monitoring of care outcomes; use of healthcare informatics in the QI process; QI projects; and leadership and change related to development and implementation of quality improvement. Students are expected to work with a team to apply knowledge in a quality-improvement project based on a current healthcare problem. Prereq. NRSG 5118 with a grade of B.

NRSG 6369. Pharmacology for Nurse Anesthesia 1. 5 Hours.

Offers the first course in a two-part series. Focuses on pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, uptake, distribution, biotransformation, and excretion of anesthetic agents and those agents used in adjunct during the course of anesthesia. Prereq. USAGPAN students only.

NRSG 6371. Pharmacology for Nurse Anesthesia 2. 4 Hours.

Offers the second course in a two-part series. Focuses on drugs used in anesthesia with particular reference to dosage, mechanism of action, characteristic drug effects, factors modifying drug effects, toxicity, and indications and contraindications for use. Prereq. NRSG 6369 with a grade of B; USAGPAN students only.

NRSG 6372. Professional Aspects of Nurse Anesthesia Practice. 3 Hours.

Part of the USAGPAN program. This course focuses on nurse anesthesia practice in a variety of practice settings. A study of the history of anesthesia and nurse anesthesia practice and the relationship of that practice in the development and growth of the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists. The legal aspects of practice will be explored. The various functional roles of the nurse anesthetist related to administration, education, research and consultation with an orientation to administration and the teaching /learning process, and research will be explored. This course will enable the student to acquire knowledge, understanding, and appreciation for the historical aspects of anesthesia, to be aware of the legal ramifications concerning the administration of anesthesia, and understand the current issues affecting the nurse anesthetist’s role in administration, education, and research. Prereq. USAGPAN students only.

NRSG 6374. Fundamentals of Nurse Anesthesia 1. 6 Hours.

Offers the first course in a three-part series. Offers students an opportunity to learn the basic principles governing the practice of anesthesia, including physical principles, anesthesia gas delivery systems, biochemistry, preparation for administration of anesthesia, and intraoperative management of anesthesia. Prereq. USAGPAN students only.

NRSG 6375. Fundamentals of Nurse Anesthesia Practice 1. 9 Hours.

Seeks to integrate nursing science with biophysical sciences to prepare nurses for the highest level of advanced nursing practice in the specialty of anesthesia. Offers students an opportunity to learn the basic principles governing the practice of anesthesia, including physical principles, anesthesia gas delivery systems, preparation for administration of anesthesia, intraoperative management of anesthesia, regional anesthesia, biomedical monitoring, and GETA simulation. Introduces the formulation of anesthetic care plans, anesthetic techniques, prevention of patient complications, procedures and equipment requirements, monitoring, record keeping, and care of equipment. Prereq. USAGPAN students only.

NRSG 6377. Fundamentals of Nurse Anesthesia 2. 6 Hours.

Offers the second course in a three-part series. Offers students an opportunity to learn the more advanced principles governing the practice of anesthesia, including the principles of regional anesthesia, biomedical monitoring, and anesthesia for special patient populations. Prereq. NRSG 6374 with a grade of B; USAGPAN students only.

NRSG 6378. Fundamentals of Nurse Anesthesia 3. 6 Hours.

Offers the final course in a three-part series. Offers students an opportunity to learn the more advanced principles governing the practice of anesthesia, including the principles of caring for patients with pathophysiologic presentations, anesthesia for trauma, and anesthesia in austere conditions. Studies formulation of anesthetic care plans, techniques, and prevention of complications. Prereq. NRSG 6377 with a grade of B; USAGPAN students only.

NRSG 6379. Fundamentals of Nurse Anesthesia Practice 2. 9 Hours.

Continues NRSG 6375. Covers a broad range of anesthesia nursing interventions. Concentrates on the theoretical basis and rationale for specific anesthetic management actions, offering students an opportunity to learn advanced principles governing anesthesia practice. Modules cover several categories of patients and types of surgical cases, including cardiovascular, pulmonary, endocrine, central nervous system, neuromuscular disorders, pediatrics, obstetrics, trauma/austere environments, and subspecialties. Introduces students to the development of individualized anesthetic care plans, anesthetic techniques, monitoring, perioperative pain management, prevention of patient complications, surgical and anesthesia procedures and equipment requirements, and record keeping. Lectures focus on advanced health/physical assessment, physiology, pathophysiology, and the scientific underpinnings of evidence-based anesthesia practice. Prereq. NRSG 6375 with a grade of B; USAGPAN students only.

NRSG 6390. Family Care of the Adult/Older Adult Patient. 4 Hours.

Focuses on the assessment, diagnosis, and management of minor acute and stabilized chronic conditions in the adult and older adult populations in the community and long-term-care facilities. Explores theories of health promotion and health maintenance. Discusses the impact of political, psychological, sociological, and physiological factors as they impact the care of the adult and older adult. Emphasizes the role of the advanced-practice nurse practitioner as a member of collaborative teams, consultant, and model of health behaviors. Prereq. NRSG 6115. Coreq. NRSG 6391. Restricted to students in the primary care nursing FNP program.

NRSG 6391. Practicum for NRSG 6390. 4 Hours.

Offers a clinical practicum focusing on the adult and older adult with risk for premature morbidity and mortality and family centered health promotion. Emphasizes the care of the adult with complex multisystem health problems and conditions. Explores care of individuals in acute- and long-term-care settings. Coreq. NRSG 6390.

NRSG 6392. Family Theory. 2 Hours.

Focuses on the assessment and management of the changing family structure across the life span of the family. Emphasizes the identification of families at risk for premature morbidity and mortality. Presents guiding principles and strategies for assessing the family, various theories of family structure and process, and techniques for engaging and connecting with families. Explores the family as an emotional unit, the individual patient as a member in his or her family of origin, and strategies for applying this knowledge in a clinical setting. Prereq. Restricted to students in the primary care nursing FNP program.

NRSG 6393. Family Care of the Pediatric and Adolescent Patient. 4 Hours.

Focuses on the health assessment of individuals from the newborn stage into young adulthood. Emphasizes the utilization of an evidence-based approach to acute and chronic health conditions. Considers family, cultural, and urban community context and anticipatory guidance and health promotion within a culturally competent framework. Prereq. NRSG 6392. Coreq. NRSG 6394. Restricted to students in the primary care nursing FNP program.

NRSG 6394. Practicum for NRSG 6393. 4 Hours.

Offers a clinical practicum focusing on providing students with clinical learning experiences in the performance of comprehensive health assessments of children and families within the urban community. Using an evidence-based and culturally competent approach, emphasizes health promotion, health maintenance, and protection, as well as identification of children and families at risk. Offers students an opportunity to learn to assess, diagnose, and manage chronic conditions and acute illnesses commonly encountered in childhood, adolescence, and young adulthood. Builds on a foundation of practice behaviors in health assessment, health promotion, and disease prevention with a particular focus on urban health. Coreq. NRSG 6393.

NRSG 6395. Healthcare of Women in Family Practice. 2 Hours.

Discusses health assessment, promotion, and care of women through the life span. Emphasizes the perinatal time period. Prereq. NRSG 6393. Coreq. NRSG 6396. Restricted to students in the primary care nursing FNP program.

NRSG 6396. Practicum for NRSG 6395. 4 Hours.

Focuses on the assessment, diagnosis, and management of acute and chronic health conditions of women and families. Emphasizes the care of women during the perinatal and postpartum periods. Explores family health as the family structure changes across its life span. Emphasizes the role of the advanced-practice nurse practitioner as a member of collaborative teams, as a consultant, and as a model of health behaviors. Coreq. NRSG 6395.

NRSG 6420. Adult-Gerontology Acute-Care Nursing Practicum 1. 2 Hours.

Focuses on the assessment, preventative, and health-maintenance aspects of acute and episodic healthcare to adults (including older adults). The clinical practice emphasizes the multiple factors affecting the adult patient across the life span. The application of theory to the care of these patients through participation, observation, and research is facilitated by assignment to a clinical preceptor. Weekly seminars focus on an array of issues surrounding the role of the advanced practice nurse. Requires students to practice in the clinical setting a minimum of eight hours per week. Coreq. NRSG 6220.

NRSG 6421. Adult-Gerontology Acute-Care Nursing Practicum 2. 4 Hours.

Continues NRSG 6420. Offers students individualized experiences in the role of practitioner, educator, and manager. Facilitated by assignment to a clinical preceptor, students focus on the provision of care to adults (including older adults) experiencing complex, critical, and chronic health problems. Demonstrates how to assess, diagnose, and manage illnesses in the acute-care, chronic, or rehabilitation setting. Uses concurrent weekly seminars to focus on the roles of the advanced practice nurse. Requires students to practice in the clinical setting a minimum of twenty hours per week. Prereq. NRSG 6420 with a grade of B. Coreq. NRSG 6221.

NRSG 6422. Adult-Gerontology Acute-Care Nursing Practicum 3. 4 Hours.

Continues NRSG 6421. Offers students an opportunity to synthesize their previous learning experiences; to plan, deliver, and evaluate advanced nursing care to patients with complex healthcare problems; and to acquire the skills necessary to manage clients in an acute-care setting. Uses concurrent weekly seminars to analyze the impact of the advanced practice role on long-term patient care, interdisciplinary relationships, and healthcare policy. Requires students to practice in the clinical setting a minimum of twenty hours per week. Prereq. NRSG 6421 with a grade of B. Coreq. NRSG 6241.

NRSG 6423. Geriatric Acute-Care Clinical Practicum. 2 Hours.

Designed to provide the student with in-depth, individualized experiences in the role of practitioner, educator, leader, and manager. Facilitated by assignment to a nurse practitioner with a practice providing care to older adults, the student focuses on managing illness across multiple healthcare settings. Concurrent weekly seminars focus on the role of the geriatric acute-care nurse practitioner. Prereq. Successful completion of clinical practicum sequence in specialization.

NRSG 6424. Specialty Acute-Care Clinical Practicum. 2 Hours.

Designed to provide the student with in-depth, individualized experiences in the role of practitioner, educator, leader, and manager in a specialty area identified by the students and consistent with professional development goals. Facilitated by assignment to a nurse practitioner with a practice providing care to acute or critically ill adults, the student focuses on managing illness across the healthcare continuum. Concurrent weekly seminars focus on the role of the acute-care nurse practitioner in a specialty area. Prereq. Successful completion of clinical practicum sequence in specialization.

NRSG 6426. Adult Health Clinical Nurse Specialist Practicum 1. 4 Hours.

Introduces students to the role of the clinical specialist in the first of a two-course sequence. Seeks to integrate principles of leadership, collaboration, consultation, and management into the role development for advanced practice. Three spheres of influence—patient/family, nursing, and organization/system—serve as the organizing framework for the clinical experience. Students are assigned a clinical nurse specialist preceptor who oversees the experiential portion of the course. Requires students to complete a minimum of twenty hours per week of precepted clinical experience, attend a weekly seminar, and conduct a needs assessment, inclusive of the development of population profiles and the conduct of clinical inquiries. Seeks to enable the successful student to define a clinical nursing problem in the healthcare setting and to develop an appropriate intervention.

NRSG 6427. Adult Health Clinical Nurse Specialist Practicum 2. 4 Hours.

Provides further opportunity for students to develop as clinical specialists in this follow-up to NRSG 6426. Explores principles of leadership, collaboration, consultation, and management as students have the opportunity to integrate these responsibilities into their advanced practice. Three spheres of influence—patient/family, nursing, and organization/system—continue to serve as the organizing framework for the clinical experience. Integrates principles of nursing research and evidence-based practice throughout the course. Students are assigned a clinical nurse specialist preceptor who oversees the experiential portion of the course. Requires students to complete a minimum of twenty hours per week of precepted clinical experience and attend a weekly seminar. Offers students an opportunity to implement and evaluate the intervention they developed in NRSG 6426 in response to the needs assessment and problem discovery. Prereq. NRSG 6426.

NRSG 6430. Neonatal Clinical Practicum 1. 4 Hours.

Focuses on the skills necessary for management of the high-risk neonate and family. Students have the opportunity to provide direct care under the supervision of NNP preceptors in the hospital neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), responsible for daily management of a specified caseload of neonates and their families, including therapeutic and diagnostic procedures. Supervised delivery room management of the high-risk neonate is expected, where available. Seeks to familiarize the student with respiratory distress syndrome, transient tachypnea, pneumonia, pulmonary hypertension, congenital heart disease, and patent ductus arteriosus, with appropriate management strategies. Requires students to practice in the clinical setting a minimum of twenty hours per week.

NRSG 6431. Neonatal Clinical Practicum 2. 4 Hours.

Continues NRSG 6430. Offers the second in a series of three courses focusing on the acquisition of clinical skills necessary for patient management of the high-risk neonate and family. Students have the opportunity to provide direct care under the supervision of NNP or neonatologist preceptors in the hospital neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), responsible for daily management of a specified caseload of neonates and their families, including therapeutic and diagnostic procedures. Supervised delivery room management of the high-risk neonate is expected, where available. Seeks to familiarize the student with disease processes commonly encountered in the term and preterm infant populations and appropriate management strategies. Requires students to practice in the clinical setting a minimum of twenty hours per week. Prereq. NRSG 6430 with a grade of B.

NRSG 6432. Neonatal Clinical Practicum 3. 2 Hours.

Continues NRSG 6431. Offers the final course in the series focusing on the acquisition of clinical skills and expertise necessary for patient management of the high-risk neonate and family. Provides the student with intensified experience in the hospital neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) providing direct care under the supervision of NNP or neonatologist preceptors. The student is responsible for daily management of a specified caseload of neonates and their families. Proficient delivery room management of the high-risk neonate is an expectation. The student should exhibit the ability to function as an independent novice practitioner with preceptor support. Prereq. NRSG 6431.

NRSG 6444. Healthcare Systems and Quality Patient Care. 3 Hours.

Offers a theory course emphasizing the use of systems thinking and systems theory as a guide for analyzing and improving healthcare systems. Emphasizes the complex challenges of leading change to achieve quality healthcare for aggregate populations within systems of care. Examines the role of nurses as leaders of the discipline and managers of healthcare services within team-based healthcare structures. Course topics include systems and organizational theory, health systems analysis, transformative leadership concepts, change management theory, outcomes assessment, and teamwork and team-based care delivery concepts and practices. Prereq. NRSG 5118 with a grade of B.

NRSG 6449. Health Promotion of Adult/Older Adult Practicum. 1 Hour.

Applies knowledge acquired in NRSG 6249. Focuses on the assessment and health promotion of adults/older adults in the primary care settings. Utilizes selected clinical experiences to increase and apply health and risk-assessment skills with adult populations in the community. Also offers students an opportunity to acquire a beginning knowledge of the role of the adult/older adult nurse practitioner in primary care settings. Prereq. NRSG 6115 with a grade of B. Coreq. NRSG 6249.

NRSG 6450. Adult/Older Adult Practicum 1. 4 Hours.

Provides a clinical learning experience that correlates with the content presented in NRSG 6250. Focuses on assessment of the adult life span within a holistic framework. Emphasizes identification of individuals at risk for premature morbidity and morality, as well as focusing on advanced health assessment techniques and interpretation of abnormal findings on physical examination and developing a client/family health-promoting plan of care within the advanced practice role of the nurse practitioner. Requires students to practice in the clinical setting a minimum of sixteen hours per week. Prereq. NRSG 6249 with a grade of B and NRSG 6449 with a grade of B.

NRSG 6451. Adult/Older Adult Practicum 2. 4 Hours.

Continues NRSG 6450. Focuses on providing the student with clinical learning experiences in the coordination and delivery of primary healthcare nursing services to adults and their families, with emphasis on underserved populations. Studies how to assess, diagnose, and manage acute and chronic conditions and illnesses commonly encountered in adult populations. Students build on a foundation of practice behaviors in health assessment, health promotion, and disease prevention. Requires students to practice in the clinical setting a minimum of sixteen hours per week. Prereq. NRSG 6450 (may be taken concurrently).

NRSG 6460. Care of Well Child/Adolescent Health Promotion Practicum. 4 Hours.

Provides the student with clinical learning experiences in the delivery and coordination of primary-care services to well infants, children, adolescents, and young adults and their families. Focuses on performing a comprehensive health assessment of the child and family utilizing a holistic approach. Emphasis is on health promotion, health maintenance, and identification of individuals or families at risk. The utilization of two clinical sites provides the opportunity for the student to evaluate interdisciplinary role responsibilities and clinical practice standards. Weekly seminar discussion fosters critical analysis of clinical experiences and the integration of theory, research, and primary practice. Requires students to practice in the clinical setting a minimum of twenty hours per week. Prereq. NRSG 6275 (may be taken concurrently).

NRSG 6461. Child/Adolescent Health Problems Practicum. 4 Hours.

Continues NRSG 6460. Focuses on providing the student with clinical learning experiences in the coordination and delivery of primary-care nursing services to infants, children, adolescents, and young adults and their families within the context of their culture and community. Studies how to assess, diagnose, and manage stable chronic conditions and acute episodic illnesses commonly encountered in childhood, adolescence, and young adulthood. Students build on a foundation of practice behaviors in health assessment, health promotion, and disease prevention. Requires students to practice in the clinical setting a minimum of twenty hours per week. Prereq. NRSG 6460 with a grade of B.

NRSG 6463. Care of the Critically Ill Child Practicum. 4 Hours.

Designed to accompany NRSG 6267, this course focuses on providing the student with clinical learning experiences in the coordination and delivery of critical care to infants, children, adolescents, and young adults and their families within the context of their culture and urban community. The goal of continued clinical practice experiences across settings and continuum of acuity care is to facilitate the development of knowledge and attitudinal competencies and skills in the delivery of care to children with a focus on critical health issues. Requires students to practice in the clinical setting a minimum of twenty hours per week. Prereq. NRSG 6461.

NRSG 6480. Psychiatric Practicum across the Life Span 1. 5 Hours.

Provides clinical experience with individuals and families throughout the life span in a psychiatric mental health setting in the advanced practice nursing role. Includes a didactic seminar that focuses on assessment of psychopathology and mental health, psychodiagnostic history taking, mental status evaluation, differential diagnosis, and treatment for various aged diverse clients. Requires students to develop a caseload, and to practice in the clinical setting a minimum of twenty hours per week with an agency preceptor. Integration of theory and practice is emphasized, utilizing the data from the students’ clinical placement as they apply to the specific diagnoses presented in clinical work. Also requires students to draft a needs assessment proposal to be completed in NRSG 6481. Prereq. NRSG 6281 (may be taken concurrently).

NRSG 6481. Psychiatric Practicum across the Life Span 2. 5 Hours.

Continues NRSG 6480. Provides clinical experiences with individuals and families throughout the life span in a mental health setting. Requires students to continue to treat a caseload of clients and to practice a minimum of twenty hours per week with an agency preceptor. The focus is on planning and providing care, utilizing various treatment modalities, applying theoretical frameworks, prevention of psychiatric problems and promotion of mental health, group process, termination issues, and evaluation of clients’ progress. Clinical cases provide the basis for discussion in didactic seminar. Requires students to complete the activity proposed in NRSG 6480 to meet an identified need in their community or clinical setting. Prereq. NRSG 6480.

NRSG 6502. Healthcare Informatics Practicum. 2 Hours.

Synthesizes knowledge and experience that advanced nurse clinicians/administrators need to acquire to use information systems effectively and efficiently in nursing and healthcare for innovative decision making and strategic planning in managerial positions in nursing. Prereq. NRSG 6304.

NRSG 6510. Nursing Leadership Role Practicum 1. 3 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to engage in a mentored nurse leadership role within a complex healthcare system. Using the AONE Nursing Leadership Competencies (2006; 2011) as a guiding framework, emphasizes developing all aspects of the leadership role and practice at the micro- and mesosystem levels with an aggregate population focus (long-term community care, school health, acute care, etc.) in a team-based care environment. Focuses on integrating systems thinking and evidence-based leadership practices when collaborating with the preceptor in current organizational and patient care issues. Students reflect on leadership experiences and emerging issues in leading and managing healthcare delivery in diverse, technical, and dynamic environments. Expects students to practice in a clinical setting for eight hours per week. Prereq. NRSG 6444 (may be taken concurrently).

NRSG 6520. Nursing Leadership Role Practicum 2. 3 Hours.

Continues NRSG 6510. Continuing to work directly with a nursing leader preceptor in a complex health care system, offers students an opportunity for a concentrated experience implementing the multifaceted role of the nurse leader by expanding their focus to include responsibility for the strategic and daily operation of nursing services. Emphasizes strengthening the student’s abilities strategically to manage interpersonal relationships effectively and to convene, participate in, and lead healthcare teams. Focuses on relational skill building, such as negotiation, conflict resolution, coaching, and evaluating. Concurrent seminars focus on an array of issues surrounding the role of the nurse leader as well as team-building skills. Expects students to practice in a clinical setting for eight hours per week. Prereq. NRSG 6510.

NRSG 6530. Nurse Anesthesia Practicum 1. 2 Hours.

Offers clinical learning opportunities designed to enable the student to develop an anesthesia plan and, with supervision, participate in the implementation of that plan. Prereq. NRSG 6324 with a grade of B. Coreq. NRSG 6321.

NRSG 6534. Nurse Anesthesia Practicum 2. 4 Hours.

Seeks to provide students with the opportunity to apply theoretical concepts in clincial settings. With supervision, students are expected to determine the appropriate sequencing and timing of emergence and postanesthesia management of the patient. Requires students to practice in the clinical setting approximately thirty-six hours per week. Prereq. NRSG 6321, NRSG 6325, and NRSG 6530, each with a grade of B. Coreq. NRSG 6322.

NRSG 6535. Nurse Anesthesia Practicum 3. 4 Hours.

Seeks to provide an in-depth clinical learning experience of advanced nurse anesthesia in specialty areas. Emphasizes increasingly independent integration of scientific principles to clinical practice and evaluation of patient outcomes and professional role development. Requires students to practice in the clinical setting approximately thirty-six hours per week. Prereq. NRSG 6322 and NRSG 6534, each with a grade of B. Coreq. NRSG 6333.

NRSG 6540. Advanced Clinical Experiences in Nurse Anesthesia 1. 1 Hour.

Offers initial integration and synthesis course of advanced knowledge and skills for interdisciplinary anesthesia nursing care for complex problems and conditions across the life span. Selected topics and clinical case studies include collaborative decision making, effective communication, and root cause/adverse event analysis. With moderate guidance, students are expected to assume greater responsibility in planning and evaluation of anesthesia care. Requires students to practice in the clinical setting approximately thirty-six hours per week. Prereq. NRSG 6333 and NRSG 6535, each with a grade of B. Coreq. NRSG 6336.

NRSG 6541. Advanced Clinical Experiences in Nurse Anesthesia 2. 1 Hour.

Offers second integration and synthesis course of advanced knowledge and skills for interdisciplinary anesthesia nursing care for complex problems and conditions across the life span. Selected topics and clinical case studies include collaborative decision making, effective communication, and root cause/adverse event analysis. With moderate guidance, students are expected to assume greater responsibility in planning and evaluation of anesthesia care. Requires students to practice in the clinical setting approximately thirty-six hours per week. Prereq. NRSG 6336 and NRSG 6540, each with a grade of B.

NRSG 6542. Advanced Clinical Experiences in Nurse Anesthesia 3. 1 Hour.

Offers third and final integration and synthesis course of advanced knowledge and skills for interdisciplinary anesthesia nursing care for complex problems and conditions across the life span. Selected topics and clinical case studies include collaborative decision making, effective communication, and root cause/adverse event analysis. With minimal guidance, students are exptected to assume greater responsibility in planning and evaluation of anesthesia care. Requires students to practice in the clinical setting approximately thirty-six hours per week. Prereq. NRSG 6541 with a grade of B.

NRSG 6550. Teaching Practicum. 2 Hours.

Provides an individualized experience in practice teaching in a clinical or educational setting. Emphasizes teaching strategies, methods of learning reinforcement, and evaluation of teaching effectiveness. Examines faculty roles and responsibilities. Requires implementation and evaluation of a teaching project or course, with assistance from a faculty preceptor.

NRSG 6551. Elective Advanced Clinical Experience. 1-4 Hours.

Provides an individualized field experience in an appropriate agency or community setting. Focuses on a selected client population to allow observation and practice of specific therapeutic skills, with supervision by the course instructor.

NRSG 6570. Nurse Anesthesia Role Practicum 1. 12 Hours.

Part of the USAGPAN program. An advanced graduate-level course which provides the student an opportunity to continue supervised clinical experience in the administration and management of anesthesia agents and techniques for all types of surgery and all patient age groups. This course provides the student an opportunity to explore current issues relevant to the practice of nurse anesthesia, and to address such issues from a legal, functional, historical, ethical, political, professional, and nursing theory framework. The course will review, discuss, and integrate clinical cases with physiology, pathophysiology, and pharmacological principles. Prereq.USAGPAN students only.

NRSG 6572. Nurse Anesthesia Clinical Practicum 1. 10 Hours.

Part of the USAGPAN program. An introductory graduate-level clinical course which provides the student an opportunity to obtain supervised clinical experience in the administration and management of anesthesia in patients undergoing surgical procedures. The course will review, discuss, and integrate clinical cases with physiology, pathophysiology, and pharmacological principles. Prereq. USAGPAN students only.

NRSG 6574. Nurse Anesthesia Role Practicum 2. 12 Hours.

Part of the USAGPAN program. An advanced course, the second of a two-course sequence, which provides the student an opportunity to study the components of the nurse anesthetist role using a multi-theoretical framework. The course will continue to review, discuss, and integrate clinical cases with physiology, pathophysiology, and pharmacological principles. Prereq. NRSG 6570 with a grade of B; USAGPAN students only.

NRSG 6576. Nurse Anesthesia Clinical Practicum 2. 10 Hours.

Part of the USAGPAN program. An intermediate graduate-level course which provides the student an opportunity to obtain supervised clinical experience in the administration and management of anesthesia in patients undergoing surgical procedures. The course will review, discuss, and integrate clinical cases with physiology, pathophysiology, and pharmacological principles. Prereq. USAGPAN students only.

NRSG 6580. Nurse Anesthesia Clinical Practicum—Advanced. 0 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to obtain further supervised clinical experience and to enhance clinical skills. Requires students to practice in the clinical setting a minimum of twenty hours per week. Prereq. USAGPAN students only.

NRSG 6800. Introduction to Industry Research Guidelines. 3 Hours.

Introduces the process by which drugs, devices, biologics, and medical procedures are tested for safety and effectiveness. Emphasizes the evolution of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA); the role of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA); the Animal Welfare Act (AWA); and the regulations pertaining to the conduct, review, and reporting of clinical research intended for FDA submission. Examines international standards as they relate to increasing levels of complexity of research. Introduces students to industry decision making in conducting clinical research trials.

NRSG 6805. Integrative Application of Evidence-Based Research: Working with Industry Partners. 3 Hours.

Introduces evidence-based practice guidelines and how to partner with industry in the research planning, implementation, and communication of findings. Emphasizes understanding the role of the healthcare professional and industry partners in facilitating, coordinating, and conducting research and interdisciplinary investigations in the field of evidence-based practice and quality improvement.

NRSG 6810. Managing Regulated Clinical Research Trials: The Role of Clinical Research Organizations. 3 Hours.

Introduces clinical trial management practices (preclinical through phase IV); clinical, medical, and safety monitoring; data management principles; biostatistical analysis; and medical writing services for preparation of an FDA New Drug Application (NDA) or Investigational Device Exemptions (IDE). Focuses on understanding the role of the healthcare professional in managing a regulated, global clinical research study.

NRSG 6812. Management of Health Problems in the School Setting. 3 Hours.

Seeks to provide school nurses with enhanced pediatric and adolescent health assessment skills and knowledge necessary to manage common diseases and illnesses in the school setting. Offers students an opportunity to synthesize knowledge from nursing, physical, social, and health sciences. Focuses on both the physical and mental health assessment process as it pertains to the school nurse. Discusses identification and management of common diagnoses and illnesses that a school nurse might encounter. Prereq. Graduate nursing students only.

NRSG 6844. Advancing Health Outcomes through Interprofessional Collaborative Practice. 2 Hours.

Seeks to provide an interdisciplinary background in the concepts and theories of interprofessional collaboration in healthcare settings and in the science and methods of teamwork and team-based care as aspects of interprofessional collaborative practice. The core competencies for interprofessional collaborative practice—values/ethics, roles/responsibilities, communication, and teams/teamwork—serve as an organizing framework for this course. Addresses the history, evidence, and outcomes of collaborative practice; the interdependence between interprofessional education and collaborative practice; professional role contributions and accountability in collaborative practice; research-based and innovative team structures; and team-based care practices and outcomes in healthcare environments, including patient-centered teams, and effective communication and collaborative skills and processes. Emphasizes the role of the advanced practice nurse in developing and leading collaborative practices and teams. Prereq. Nursing students only.

NRSG 6850. Introduction to Health and Aging. 3 Hours.

Seeks to offer students core knowledge of health and aging. Uses current literature and research to integrate the sociological, psychological, and physical aspects of aging in multicultural, political, and economic ecological contexts. Prereq. Bouvé students only.

NRSG 6864. Professional Preparation Seminar. 0 Hours.

Seeks to prepare the newly graduated BSN student to take necessary steps for entry into the professional nursing role and workforce prior to beginning master’s specialization. Focuses on strategies for the transition from student nurse to professional nurse. Prereq. Nursing and nursing administration graduate students only.

NRSG 6962. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

NRSG 6964. Co-op Work Experience. 0 Hours.

Provides eligible students with an opportunity for work experience.

NRSG 7100. Leadership in Advanced Practice Nursing. 3 Hours.

Seeks to provide a solid foundation for providing leadership. Analyzes the principles of transformational leadership and organizational behavior pertinent to healthcare systems. Seeks to prepare nursing leaders at the practice doctorate level to use critical thinking skills and evidence-based decision making to effect systems and organizational change. Discusses leadership skills and characteristics of leadership styles within the broader framework of interprofessional collaboration and innovations in healthcare delivery. Presents information from a variety of disciplines and perspectives (legal, fiscal, ethical, cultural, and political) for purposes of improving quality of care for patients, populations, and communities in healthcare settings across the continuum of care. Prereq. Students enrolled in the Doctorate of Nursing Practice Program only.

NRSG 7104. Foundations in Nursing Research. 3 Hours.

Addresses the development of nursing science with specific emphasis on the importance of developing theory-based research. Includes a broad review of the various types of research studies (e.g., descriptive, causal, and relational); the steps of the research process; and the related analytic strategies and/or issues associated with each type of research study. Also reviews the guidelines for conducting critical literature reviews (i.e., systematic or meta-analyses) and how the results are used to determine the type of research study to employ. Discusses the scientific principles and integrity related to the conduct of responsible research and the means for assuring ethical integrity of research on human subjects. Prereq. Nursing PhD students only.

NRSG 7105. Translating Research Evidence into Practice. 3 Hours.

Offers opportunities for students to examine strategies and tools for retrieval, compilation, critical appraisal, and application of empirical, reflective, and practice-based information to improve quality of care and health outcomes for populations of interest. Uses systematic reviews, case studies emphasizing use of quality improvement methods, clinical guidelines, collaborative interprofessional practice networks, and information technology. Includes program evaluation strategies and interpretation of biostatistical concepts relevant to population-based advanced practice. Offers students an opportunity to explore techniques that support their professional presence and voice as a leader. This course meets the requirements of the following DNP Essentials of Doctoral Education for Advanced Practice Nursing: (1): Scientific Underpinnings for Practice; (3): Clinical Scholarship and Analytical Methods for Evidence-Based (AACN, 2006).

NRSG 7110. Evidence-Based Practice Research Application. 2 Hours.

Offers graduate nursing students an opportunity to work singly or in groups of two with an experienced researcher in an area related to their clinical specialization or other professional interest. The student’s individual contribution depends on the stage of the research project and is determined jointly by the student, faculty liaison, and researcher. Evaluation includes the student’s individual effort, participation in the collaborative research process, and appraisal of the learning experience as a research assistant. By participating in an established, scientifically significant project, offers students an opportunity to actively experience the “real-life” aspects of conducting research and to be socialized to the role of the researcher. Prereq. NRSG 7105 with a grade of B; nursing students only.

NRSG 7400. Nurse Anesthesia Clinical Practicum 1. 5 Hours.

Constitutes an introductory doctoral-level clinical anesthesia course that offers the novice student registered nurse anesthetist (SRNA) an opportunity to gain supervised clinical experience in the preparation, administration, and management of anesthesia in patients undergoing surgical procedures or requiring pain management. Offers students an opportunity to begin to incorporate didactic (Phase 1) knowledge into providing anesthesia care of all forms to patients across the life span and to apply American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status classification. The students receive extensive mentoring and direction with the goal of becoming safe, novice SRNAs able to accept increased independence and responsibility. Prereq. NRSG 6379; USAGPAN students only.

NRSG 7403. Nurse Anesthesia Clinical Practicum 2. 5 Hours.

Constitutes an introductory doctoral-level clinical anesthesia course that offers the advanced-beginner student registered nurse anesthetist (SRNA) an opportunity to gain supervised clinical experience in the preparation, administration, and management of anesthesia in patients undergoing surgical procedures. Offers students an opportunity to continue to incorporate didactic (Phase 1) knowledge into providing anesthesia care of all forms to patients across the life span and to apply American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status classification. The SRNA continues to receive extensive mentoring and direction and is expected to demonstrate performance consistent with the advanced beginner and not at the level of a novice nursing anesthesia student. Prereq. NRSG 7400; USAGPAN students only.

NRSG 7406. Nurse Anesthesia Clinical Practicum 3. 5 Hours.

Constitutes an advanced doctoral-level clinical anesthesia course that offers the senior student registered nurse anesthetist (SRNA) an opportunity to gain clinical experience with reduced levels of supervision in the preparation, administration, and management of anesthesia in patients undergoing surgical procedures. Expects students to incorporate the science of anesthesia (i.e., didactic knowledge) and evidence-based practice as found in the anesthesia literature into providing anesthesia care of all forms to patients across the life span and to apply American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status classification. The SRNA continues to receive mentoring and direction and is expected to demonstrate performance consistent with the competent anesthesia provider and not at the level of an advanced-beginner nursing anesthesia student. Prereq. NRSG 7403; USAGPAN students only.

NRSG 7409. Nurse Anesthesia Clinical Practicum 4. 5 Hours.

Constitutes an advanced doctoral-level clinical anesthesia course that offers the senior student registered nurse anesthetist (SRNA) an opportunity to gain clinical experience with minimal supervision in the preparation, administration, and management of anesthesia in patients undergoing surgical procedures. Expects students to incorporate the science of anesthesia (i.e., didactic knowledge) and evidence-based practice as found in the anesthesia literature into providing anesthesia care of all forms to patients of all ages and health status. The SRNA continues to receive mentoring and direction as necessary, is expected to demonstrate performance consistent with the competent-to-proficient anesthesia provider, and have the ability to function independently as a CRNA in a military and/or Department of Defense (DOD) facility or deployed environment. Prereq. NRSG 7406; USAGPAN students only.

NRSG 7412. Nurse Anesthesia Role Development 1. 6 Hours.

Constitutes an introductory doctoral-level course that offers the novice student registered nurse anesthetist (SRNA) an opportunity to continue supervised clinical experience while developing the skills necessary to function as a professional clinician and member of a military/Department of Defense (DOD) healthcare system. Focuses on developing anesthesia providers capable of functioning as the sole anesthesia provider in potentially austere environments. The role of a DOD-certified registered nurse anesthetist requires a high level of leadership, communication and interpersonal skills, collaboration with the surgical team, and unwavering independence. Seeks to facilitate a broad vision of the military surgical mission with a focus on high-quality care, patient outcomes, and improvement of safety through system processes. Prereq. NRSG 6379; USAGPAN students only.

NRSG 7415. Nurse Anesthesia Role Development 2. 6 Hours.

Constitutes an introductory doctoral-level course that offers the novice student registered nurse anesthetist (SRNA) an opportunity to continue supervised clinical experience while developing the skills necessary to function as a professional clinician and member of a military/Department of Defense (DOD) healthcare system. Focuses on developing anesthesia providers capable of functioning as the sole anesthesia provider in potentially austere environments. The role of a DOD-certified registered nurse anesthetist requires a high level of leadership, communication and interpersonal skills, collaboration with the surgical team, and unwavering independence. Seeks to facilitate a broad vision of the military surgical mission with a focus on high-quality care, patient outcomes, and improvement of safety through system processes. Prereq. NRSG 7412; USAGPAN students only.

NRSG 7418. Nurse Anesthesia Role Development 3. 6 Hours.

Constitutes a doctoral-level course that offers the senior student registered nurse anesthetist (SRNA) an opportunity to continue clinical experience while developing the skills necessary to function as a professional clinician and member of a military/Department of Defense (DOD) healthcare system. Focuses on developing anesthesia providers capable of functioning as the sole anesthesia provider in potentially austere environments. The role of a DOD-certified registered nurse anesthetist requires a high level of leadership, communication and interpersonal skills, collaboration with the surgical team, and unwavering independence. Seeks to help refine the professional role of the SRNA and facilitate a broad vision of the military surgical mission with a focus on high-quality care, patient outcomes, and improvement of safety through system processes. Prereq. NRSG 7415; USAGPAN students only.

NRSG 7421. Nurse Anesthesia Role Development 4. 6 Hours.

Constitutes an advanced doctoral-level course that offers the senior student registered nurse anesthetist (SRNA) an opportunity to continue clinical experience while refining the skills necessary to function as a professional clinician and member of a military/Department of Defense (DOD) healthcare system. Focuses on developing anesthesia providers capable of functioning as the sole anesthesia provider in potentially austere environments. Requires a high level of leadership, communication and interpersonal skills, collaboration with the surgical team, and unwavering independence. Seeks to help refine the professional role of the SRNA. Challenges SRNAs to set the example as professional doctoral-level anesthesia students and assist (to the extent possible) in mentoring the junior SRNAs in their professional/clinical roles. Prereq. NRSG 7418; USAGPAN students only.

NRSG 7700. The Science of Nursing. 3 Hours.

Introduces basic concepts in philosophy of science and the development of knowledge. Explores the historical development and themes for knowledge building in nursing and healthcare. Offers students an opportunity to analyze different ways of knowing and world views as they relate to the development of programs of research in nursing. Content from this course is applied to each student’s area of research interest. The examination of the scientific literature, identification of gaps in knowledge, and the development of research questions are completed to begin the process of developing a research plan. Prereq. Nursing majors only.

NRSG 7705. Theoretical and Conceptual Foundations in Nursing Science. 3 Hours.

Examines the nature of nursing science by critically analyzing the current relevance of nursing theories and conceptual models to the advancement of nursing’s scientific development. Emphasizes various approaches to concept/theory development, analysis, and synthesis. Expects students to develop skills in concept/theory analysis and synthesis and to apply these skills to a formal analysis of concept relevant to their phenomena of interest. Prereq. NRSG 7700 (which may be taken concurrently) or permission of instructor; nursing PhD students only or permission of instructor.

NRSG 7709. Qualitative Research Methods. 3 Hours.

Examines published qualitative research in nursing and related disciplines. Emphasizes major strategies of qualitative inquiry, including ethnography, grounded theory, phenomenology, narrative inquiry, and case study. Offers students an opportunity to begin to develop mastery in critiquing qualitative research, ethical issues, data analysis techniques, and proposal development. Prereq. NRSG 7700 with a grade of B.

NRSG 7712. Quantitative Research Methods. 3 Hours.

Introduces different types of quantitative research methods as they relate to investigation of phenomena in nursing and healthcare. Begins with a focus on defining research problems, theory testing, and causal inference, then explores a range of research designs and methodologic techniques that are available for empirical research. Quantitative techniques include sampling, data collection, analysis, and interpretation. Prereq. NRSG 7700 with a grade of B.

NRSG 7715. Measurement in Clinical Research. 3 Hours.

Examines the concepts of measurement, sources of measurement error, control, and instrumentation as they relate to variables in clinical research. Students have an opportunity to explore the procedural aspects of measurement, criterion-referenced and norm-referenced measures, as well as the reliability and validity of measurement techniques. Discusses methods and statistical procedures used in instrument design and testing, such as instrument blueprints, factor analysis, and item response theory. Emphasizes the measurement of variables to evaluate the effectiveness of clinical interventions. Prereq. NRSG 7700 with a grade of B.

NRSG 7750. Healthcare of Urban Populations. 3 Hours.

Provides students with an opportunity to explore the body of urban health research to identify key themes, conceptual foundations, and contemporary research findings. Examines integration of cultural and community contextual factors that affect the health status of urban populations. These include racial, ethnic, and economic health disparities; influences of the urban physical environment and the urban social environment; and the availability of and access to health and social services. Studies the influence of concepts such as vulnerability, underserved, culture, ethnicity, poverty, discrimination, disparities in healthcare, urbanization, diversity, social determinants of health, environmental justice, and migration on health status. Prereq. Nursing majors only.

NRSG 7755. Intervention Research: Development, Implementation, and Evaluation. 3 Hours.

Examines theory-based intervention research for individuals, groups, populations, and systems. Offers an overview of the types of theory-based interventions across the health spectrum. Reviews the development and testing of theory-based interventions. Emphasizes understanding the strengths and challenges of integrating technology across the development, testing, and implementation of a theory-based intervention. Also emphasizes the selection of existing interventions, the process of adaption, and the valid and reliable execution of the selected theory-based intervention by examining such issues as treatment, fidelity, intervention duration, context, and interventionist expertise. Compares and contrasts intervention research developed for efficacy, effectiveness, and implementation. Prereq. NRSG 7705, NRSG 7709 (both may be taken concurrently), and PhD program enrollment or permission of instructor.

NRSG 7770. Research Colloquium. 1 Hour.

Offers doctoral students an opportunity to explore in-depth key concepts in nursing and healthcare research. Led by a faculty expert, offers students an opportunity to engage in meaningful dialogue and analysis to examine the concept from multiple perspectives. Prereq. Nursing PhD students only.

NRSG 7780. Advanced Statistics. 3 Hours.

Reviews basic statistical concepts and their applications as a foundation for data analysis. Provides students with an opportunity to build upon their previous knowledge of statistics and explore the topics of multiple analysis of variance, logistic regression, repeated measures, latent variables, and structural equation modeling. Examines data analysis strategies of multiple regression, canonical analysis, and discriminant analysis as applied to clinical nursing research. Prereq. Nursing majors only.

NRSG 7782. Multiple Regression Analysis in Health Sciences. 3 Hours.

Presents regression analysis at an advanced level. Focuses on regression for continuous variables: specification, estimation, testing, and diagnostics. Explores logistic regression for binomial and multinomial variables, log-linear regression for continuous variables, and proportional hazards regression for duration variables. Prereq. NRSG 7780 and NRSG 7781.

NRSG 7915. Capstone 1. 3 Hours.

Reflects the culmination of practice inquiry, knowledge, and competencies attained during the Doctorate of Nursing Practice program. Expects that students have identified a practice area that provides a guide for the development and completion of a capstone project. In this seminar, students are guided through the process of evidence-based project development, including formulation of goals and objectives, refinement of project design, implementation strategies, development of tools and or forms for data collection, identification of resources (personnel and fiscal), and evaluation. Through group discussion, offers students an opportunity to participate in a process of peer consultation and critique in support of project refinement. Prereq. NRSG 7105 with a grade of B; DNP students only.

NRSG 7917. Capstone 2. 6 Hours.

Reflects the culmination of practice inquiry, knowledge, and competencies attained during the Doctorate of Nursing Practice program. In this seminar, students are guided through the process of completing an evidenced-based project and disseminating the results of the project. Prereq. NRSG 7915; DNP students only.

NRSG 7920. The Steps to Practice Inquiry: Analyze, Evaluate, Synthesize, and Apply the Evidence. 3 Hours.

Designed as a complement to NRSG 7105 or equivalent. Offers students an opportunity to obtain skills and competencies needed for a practice doctorate—ability to generate new knowledge from practice, evaluate current practice approaches, analyze current knowledge, and adapt/translate knowledge into usable clinical strategies that improve practice and lead to better outcomes. Prereq. DNP students only.

NRSG 7921. DNP Scholarly Project 1: Design and Ethical Consideration of Practice Application. 3 Hours.

Reflects the culmination of practice inquiry, knowledge, and competencies attained during the Doctorate of Nursing Practice program. In this seminar, students are mentored through the process of evidence-based project development, including formulation of goals and objectives; refinement of project design and implementation strategies; and development of tools and/or forms for data collection, identification of resources (personnel and fiscal), ethical review, and evaluation. Offers students an opportunity to participate in a process of peer consultation and critique in support of project refinement. Requires a minimum total of 250 scholarly practice hours. Prereq. NRSG 7920 with a grade of B; DNP students only.

NRSG 7922. DNP Scholarly Project 2: Applying Practice Knowledge—Implementation/Outcomes. 3 Hours.

Reflects the culmination of practice inquiry, knowledge, and competencies attained during the Doctorate of Nursing Practice program. In this seminar, students are guided through the process of completing an evidence-based project. Emphasizes the acquisition of reflective practice skills and competencies needed to assess and implement evaluation of evidence and outcomes. Requires a minimum total of 250 scholarly practice hours. Prereq. NRSG 7921; DNP students only.

NRSG 7923. DNP Scholarly Project 3: Dissemination of Practice Inquiry. 3 Hours.

Reflects the culmination of practice inquiry, knowledge, and competencies attained during the Doctorate of Nursing Practice program. In this seminar, students are guided through the process of summarizing and disseminating the results of the project. Requires a minimum total of 250 scholarly practice hours. Prereq. NRSG 7922; DNP students only.

NRSG 7976. Directed Study. 1-4 Hours.

Allows PhD students to develop an individual plan to attain specific knowledge related to research goals or specific research technique/approach. May consist of library study and reading, preparation of scholarly presentation or publication, mentored research experience, or other appropriate activity as approved by professor and academic advisor.

NRSG 7990. Thesis. 1-4 Hours.

Allows students to implement a research proposal with the guidance of a thesis adviser. Requires data collection and analysis, writing the thesis, and presentation of the findings.

NRSG 8960. Exam Preparation—Doctoral. 0 Hours.

Offers the student the opportunity, under faculty supervision, to prepare for the PhD qualifying exam.

NRSG 9000. Comprehensive Exam. 0 Hours.

Indicates successful completion of the doctoral comprehensive exam.

NRSG 9845. Dissertation Seminar 1. 3 Hours.

Guides students through the beginning of the research process as they prepare their dissertation proposals, including writing the literature review and outlining the research design for their projects. Students have an opportunity to work with their dissertation advisors both individually and in small groups. Prereq. NRSG 7700 with a grade of B; nursing majors only.

NRSG 9846. Dissertation Seminar 2. 3 Hours.

Provides students with an opportunity to finalize their dissertation proposals and make the necessary arrangements to begin their investigations by completing the design and methods and obtaining Investigative Review Board approval. Students have an opportunity to work with their dissertation advisors both individually and in small groups. Prereq. NRSG 9845 with a grade of B.

NRSG 9984. Research. 1-4 Hours.

Offers an opportunity to conduct research under faculty supervision.

NRSG 9986. Research. 0 Hours.

Offers an opportunity to conduct full-time research under faculty supervision.

NRSG 9990. Dissertation. 1 Hour.

Offers research/experimental work for PhD thesis on a full-time basis. Prereq. Doctoral candidacy; Bouvé students only.

NRSG 9996. Dissertation Continuation. 0 Hours.

Offers continuation of PhD dissertation research.