Mechanical Engineering

Website

Hanchen Huang, PhD
Professor and Chair

Nader Jalili, PhD
Professor and Associate Chair for Graduate Studies and Research

334 Snell Engineering Center
617.373.2740
617.373.2921 (fax)
Tess Waggett, Business Manager, tess.waggett@northeastern.edu

The Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering (MIE) offers comprehensive research and educational programs for both MS and PhD students in both traditional mechanical and industrial engineering disciplines, as well as applied programs. Our cutting-edge and vibrant doctoral programs include PhD in Mechanical Engineering and Interdisciplinary PhD; while our master's degree programs consist of mechanical engineering with concentrations in material science, mechanics and design, mechatronics, thermofluids, and general mechanical engineering. These extensive programs and concentrations allow for the selection of a degree that meets a wide variety of personal and professional goals.

Master of Science Degree

To be eligible for admission to any of the Master of Science (MS) degree programs, a prospective student must hold a Bachelor of Science degree in engineering, science, mathematics, or an equivalent field. Students in all master’s degree programs must complete a minimum of 32 semester hours of approved course work (exclusive of any preparatory courses) with a minimum GPA of 3.000 (see table below).  Students may pursue any program either on a full-time or part-time basis; however, certain restrictions may apply.

Degree Requirements Course Work Only With Project With Thesis
Required and elective courses 32 SH 28 SH 24 SH
MEIE 6800 Technical Writing N/A 0 SH 0 SH
MEIE 6850 Research Seminar in Mechanical and Industrial Engineering N/A 0 SH 0 SH
Project/thesis 0 SH 4 SH 8 SH
Minimum semester hours required 32 SH 32 SH 32 SH

The MIE department offers a master's degree in mechanical engineering with one of the following concentrations:

  • General mechanical engineering
  • Material science
  • Mechanics and design
  • Mechatronics
  • Thermofluids

Graduate Certificate Options

Students enrolled in a master's degree in Mechanical Engineering have the opportunity to also pursue one of 14 engineering graduate certificate options in addition to or in combination with the MS degree. Students should consult their faculty advisor regarding these options.

Gordon Institute of Engineering Leadership Option

Students have the opportunity to pursue the Gordon Engineering leadership program in combination with the MS degree.

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) Degree

The MIE department admits applicants to the PhD program either directly after earning a suitable bachelor’s degree (Direct Entry) or after earning a master’s degree (Advanced Entry). Upon acceptance into the program, an applicant is designated as a doctoral student. This designation is changed to doctoral candidate upon successful completion of the doctoral qualifying examinations (both written and oral area exams) and all the required course work. The PhD is awarded to students who demonstrate high academic achievement and research competence in the fields of mechanical or industrial engineering. The MIE department expects all successful doctoral candidates to show depth of knowledge and research innovation in their chosen field of specialization. 

Materials Engineering Courses

MATL 5375. Corrosion of Materials. 4 Hours.

Studies the thermodynamics and rate of corrosion both in aqueous and nonaqueous environments. Topics include different forms of corrosion, mixed potential theory, corrosion testing, corrosion prevention, environmental effects, dependence on materials structure, and high-temperature metal-gas reactions. Emphasis is on metals, alloys, and engineering plastics. Prereq. ME 2340 with a grade of B or graduate standing.

MATL 5380. Particulate Materials Processing. 4 Hours.

Covers the processing of metallic and ceramic materials from particulate form. Includes particulate fabrication, characterization, handling, and consolidation for alloys, ceramics, and composites. Other topics include the principles of sintering in the absence and presence of liquid, advanced materials processing by rapid-solidification powder metallurgy, and the processing and structures of advanced ceramics. Prereq. ME 2340 with a grade of B or graduate standing.

MATL 6250. Soft Matter. 4 Hours.

Introduces the relatively young field of soft matter, which encompasses the physical description of various states of soft materials including liquids, colloids, polymers, foams, gels, granular materials, and a number of biological materials. Soft matter (also known as “soft condensed matter” or “complex fluids”) is less ordered than metals and oxides (hard condensed matter) and is more subject to thermal fluctuations and applied forces. Focuses on critical thinking, problem diagnosis, estimation, statistical analysis, and data-based decision making. Includes many in-class demonstrations from colloidal assembly to emulsion stability to cellular apoptosis. Highlights applications such as industrial processing, life sciences, and environmental remediation. Prereq. Graduate study in related field or permission of instructor.

MATL 6285. Structure, Properties, and Processing of Polymeric Materials. 4 Hours.

Provides an introduction to the organic chemistry of polymers, the effects of chemical composition on structure, melting point, and degradation, and the thermodynamics of polymers. Other topics include the mechanical properties of polymers, analysis and testing, the effects of processing on structures and properties, and the processing of industrial polymers, with applications. Prereq. Engineering students only.

MATL 6290. Fundamentals of Nanostructured Materials. 4 Hours.

Covers fundamentals of 1-2D nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes, graphene, nanowires, 2D atomic crystals (transition metal dichalcogenides), nanostructured graphites and their novel physical properties, and related nanotechnology. Draws from various textbooks and from seminal scientific journal articles that paved the new era of nanomaterials and nanotechnology in the past couple of decades. Includes lab demonstrations and assignments for some nanomaterials synthesis and characterization. Prereq. An introduction to materials science and engineering, solid state physics, chemistry of materials, or any related materials engineering background is strongly recommended.

MATL 6300. Computational Material Science. 4 Hours.

Covers the principles and practice of modern computer simulation techniques used to understand solids, liquids, and gases. Reviews the statistical foundation of thermodynamics followed by in-depth discussion of Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics techniques, as well as their links to mesoscale and continuum computational techniques. Discusses intermolecular potentials; extended ensembles; and mathematical algorithms used in molecular simulations, parallel algorithms, and visualization. Prereq. ME 6200 and knowledge of materials science; restricted to students in the College of Engineering, the College of Computer and Information Science, and the College of Science.

MATL 6962. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

MATL 6964. Co-op Work Experience. 0 Hours.

Provides eligible students with an opportunity for work experience. Prereq. ENCP 6000.

MATL 6966. Practicum. 1-4 Hours.

Provides eligible students with an opportunity for practical experience.

MATL 7345. Macroscopic Transport in Materials Processing. 4 Hours.

Discusses principles of mathematical and physical modeling of the processing of primary and electronic materials. Practical examples include continuous casting, rheocasting, metal-matrix composites, thermal spraying, magnetohydrodynamics, microgravity processing, growth of semiconductor crystals, and chemical vapor deposition. Explores transport equations as tools of mathematical models and similarity criteria as tools of physical models. Topics include Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluid mechanics, multiphase flow, dimensionless numbers, conductive and convective heat transfer, thermal radiation, diffusion and mass transfer with chemical reaction, order-of-magnitude analysis, and intelligent processing techniques. Prereq. Knowledge of heat transfer.

MATL 7350. Mechanical Behavior and Strengthening Mechanisms. 4 Hours.

Covers dislocation theory and includes such topics as crystalline defects, elastic properties of dislocation, movement of dislocations, multiplication, intersection, annihilation, dislocations in crystalline materials, and dislocation arrays and crystal boundaries. Examines application of dislocation theory to microplasticity, dynamic recovery and recrystallization, strengthening mechanisms, and high-temperature deformation. Prereq. Knowledge of materials science course; engineering students only.

MATL 7355. Thermodynamics of Materials. 4 Hours.

Covers fundamentals of materials thermodynamics that encompass the first, second, and third laws, entropy, enthalpy, and free energy. Emphasis is on phase stability and equilibria, phase diagram computation with applications to phases in metals, alloys, and ionic compounds. Prereq. Knowledge of thermodynamics course and materials science course; engineering students only.

MATL 7360. Kinetics of Phase Transformations. 4 Hours.

Focuses on the different types of phase transformations that occur in materials in relation to theory and practice. Topics include the diffusion equations, mechanisms of diffusion in crystalline solids, random walk theory, ionic conduction, high-diffusivity paths, diffusional and nondiffusional phase transformations, and microstructural evolution in material processing. Prereq. MATL 7355; engineering students only.

MATL 7365. Properties and Processing of Electronic Materials. 4 Hours.

Focuses on electronic principles and the processing techniques underlying the processing/structure/property relationships of materials. Covers metals and alloys, semiconductors, and insulators. Topics include electronic structures, band theory; thermal, electrical, and magnetic properties; and processing methods including film deposition. Prereq. Engineering students only.

MATL 7374. Special Topics in Materials Engineering. 4 Hours.

Offers topics of interest to the staff member conducting this class for advanced study.

MATL 7390. Advanced Materials Processing. 4 Hours.

Introduces students to such new topics in materials processing as advanced joining, advanced coatings, nanocrystalline materials, biomaterials, materials in information technology, rapid prototyping, and nano/microfabrication. Prereq. Engineering students only.

MATL 7395. Fundamentals of Solidification. 4 Hours.

Discusses fundamental aspects of the solidification of metals and alloys in both conventional and advanced solidification processing. Topics covered include the nucleation and growth of solids, the morphological stability of the solid/liquid interface, capillarity effects, cellular and dendritic solidification, effects of diffusion and convection, eutectic solidification, and the solidification of undercooled melts. Prereq. MATL 7360; engineering students only.

MATL 7945. Master’s Project. 4 Hours.

Offers theoretical or experimental work under individual faculty supervision. Prereq. Engineering students only.

MATL 7962. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

MATL 7978. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers theoretical or experimental work under individual faculty supervision. Prereq. Engineering students only.

MATL 7990. Thesis. 1-8 Hours.

Offers analytical and/or experimental work conducted under the direction of the faculty in fulfillment of the requirements for the degree. Requires first-year students to attend a graduate seminar program that introduces the students to the methods of choosing a research topic, conducting research, and preparing a thesis. Requires successful completion of the seminar program. Prereq. Engineering students only.

MATL 7994. Thesis Continuation—Part Time. 0 Hours.

Continues thesis work conducted under the supervision of a departmental faculty member.

MATL 7996. Thesis Continuation. 0 Hours.

Offers continuing master’s thesis supervision under individual faculty supervision. Prereq. Engineering students only.

Mechanical Engineering Courses

ME 5240. Computer Aided Design and Manufacturing. 4 Hours.

Covers basic aspects of computer graphics and CAD/CAM. Topics include hardware and software concepts, generic structure of CAD/CAM software and its modules, and CAD/CAM database structure. Also covers the parametric representations of curves, surfaces, solids, and features that are widely used in existing commercial CAD/CAM systems. Discusses geometrical transformations, CAD/CAM data exchange formats, prototyping techniques, and PDM. Presents applications such as mass properties calculations, assemblies, mechanical tolerancing, simulation, finite element mesh generation, process planning and CAPP, CNC part programming, and Web-based CAD/CAM. Prereq. (a) GE 1110 with a grade of B, GE 1501 with a grade of B, or graduate standing and (b) junior, senior, or graduate standing; engineering students only.

ME 5245. Mechatronic Systems. 4 Hours.

Covers integration of electronic/electrical engineering, computer technology, and control engineering with mechanical engineering to provide a self-contained, modern treatment of mixed systems along with their computer simulation and applications. Topics include mixed-systems integration; sensors, actuation systems; brief overview of dynamic systems modeling, response characterization, and closed-loop controllers; interfacing; data presentation systems and processes; microprocessors; real-time monitoring and control; and applications of mechatronic systems. The course also offers numerous MATLAB/Simulink examples of select mechatronic systems and devices along with open-ended design projects and assignments. Prereq. (a) ME 4555 or ME 5659 and (b) senior or graduate standing; engineering students only.

ME 5250. Robot Mechanics and Control. 4 Hours.

Covers kinematics and dynamics of robot manipulators, including the development of kinematics equations of manipulators, the inverse kinematics problem, and motion trajectories. Employs Lagrangian mechanics to cover dynamics of manipulators for the purpose of control. Covers control and programming of robots, steady state errors, calculations of servoparameters, robot vision systems and algorithms, as well as imaging techniques and the concept of mobile robots. Prereq. ME 4555 or graduate standing.

ME 5374. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering. 4 Hours.

Offers topics of current interest in mechanical engineering. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing; engineering students only.

ME 5600. Materials Processing and Process Selection. 4 Hours.

Covers the fundamentals and usage of processes and techniques for bulk, thick film, thin film, and patterned structures. Covers techniques for improvement of mechanical or functional properties, for reliability, or for operation in harsh environments. Includes case studies for which processes are selected based on efficacy, material input, and cost. Systems studied include biocompatible implants and materials for the telecommunication, semiconductor, energy, and aerospace industries. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing; engineering students only.

ME 5645. Environmental Issues in Manufacturing and Product Use. 4 Hours.

Explores environmental and economic aspects of different materials used in products throughout the product life cycle. Introduces concepts of industrial ecology, life cycle analysis, and sustainable development. Students work in teams to analyze case studies of specific products fabricated using metals, ceramics, polymers, or paper. These case studies compare cost, energy, and resources used and emissions generated through the mining, refining, manufacture, use, and disposal stages of the product life cycle. Debates issues in legislation (extended product responsibility, recycling mandates, and ecolabeling) and in disposal strategies (landfill, incineration, reuse, and recycling). Discusses difficulties associated with environmental impact assessments and the development of decision analysis tools to weigh the tradeoffs in technical, economic, and environmental performance, and analyzes specific case studies. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

ME 5650. Advanced Mechanics of Materials. 4 Hours.

Covers stress, strain, and deformation analysis of simple structures including beams, plates, and shells. Topics include classical theory of circular and rectangular plates; combined effects of bending and in-plane forces; buckling of plates; effects of shear deformation and of large deflections; membrane theory of shells; analysis of cylindrical shells; introduction to energy methods with applications to beams, frames, and rings; Ritz method; and the concept of stability as applied to one and two degree-of-freedom systems buckling of bars, frames, and rings. Prereq. Graduate standing or permission of instructor.

ME 5655. Dynamics and Mechanical Vibration. 4 Hours.

Covers dynamic response of discrete and continuous media. Topics include work and energy, impulse and momentum, Lagrangian dynamics, free and forced response to periodic and transient excitations, vibration absorber, free and forced response of multiple degree-of-freedom systems with and without damping, method of modal analysis, vibrations of continuous media such as extensional, torsional, and bending vibrations of bars, and approximate methods of analysis. Prereq. Graduate standing or permission of instructor.

ME 5657. Finite Element Method. 4 Hours.

Focuses on numerical techniques for solving engineering problems. Topics include introduction to the finite element method; methods of approximations and variational methods; Rayleigh-Ritz method and Galerkin formulation; interpolation functions; truss, beam, plate, shell, and solid elements; stiffness matrix and assembly of element equations; application of finite element method in fluid and heat transfer problems; linear, nonlinear, and transient problems; numerical integration and methods of solving systems of equations for static and dynamic problems; and use of a finite element general-purpose commercial package. Prereq. Graduate standing or permission of instructor.

ME 5659. Control Systems Engineering. 4 Hours.

Covers concepts in design and control of dynamical systems. Topics include review of continuous-time system modeling and dynamic response; principles of feedback, classical and modern control analyses, and design techniques such as root locus, frequency response (e.g., Bode plots and Nyquist Criteria), and state-space feedback; dynamic analysis, design, and control of electromechanical systems; block diagram algebra or signal-flow graphs, effects of poles and zeros on system response characteristics; principles of controllability, observability, observer designs, and pole placement techniques; introduction to adaptive and learning control and digital implementation of control algorithms. Prereq. Graduate standing or permission of instructor.

ME 5665. Musculoskeletal Biomechanics. 4 Hours.

Using a three-part format, emphasizes the quantitative analysis of human musculoskeletal system statics and dynamics, including, in part I, gait analysis and estimation of the complex loads on human joint systems. Investigates how the form of connective tissue and bone is derived from function in part II, including a quantitative analysis of the material properties of bone, ligament, tendon, and cartilage. Working in groups in part III, students select and investigate a relevant, current topic in musculoskeletal biomechanics and present their findings to the class. Prereq. Graduate standing or permission of instructor.

ME 5667. Solid Mechanics of Cells and Tissues. 4 Hours.

Focuses on the multiscale mechanical behavior of biological tissues. The mechanical integrity of a single cell depends on the mechanical properties and geometrical arrangements of the fiber network in the extracellular matrix. Introduces the statistical concept of persistent length and entanglement of long-chain polymer molecules, linear elasticity and viscoelasticity, membrane undulations, stability of vesicles. Discusses the intersurface forces that cause cells to adhere and to form microscopic, mesoscopic, and macroscopic two-dimensional membranes and three-dimensional structures. Introduces experimental techniques and measurements involving atomic force microscope, surface force apparatus, optical tweezers, micropipette aspiration. Examples are given for specific physiological and path-physiological phenomena related to mechanical and adhesion behavior of cells and membranes. Prereq. Graduate standing or permission of instructor.

ME 5685. Solar Thermal Engineering. 4 Hours.

Develops a model for the hourly direct and diffuse radiation under a cover of scattered clouds and the transmission and absorption of this radiation by passive and active systems. Considers the design of air heating systems and the storage of the collected energy by a pebble bed, and considers elements of heater exchanger design. Makes a study of the economics of a domestic water and/or space heating system using f-chart analysis. Prereq. (a) ME 4570 or equivalent and (b) junior, senior, or graduate standing; engineering students only.

ME 5690. Gas Turbine Combustion. 4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to obtain an understanding of the basic physical, chemical, and aerodynamic processes associated with combustion in gas turbine engines and their relevance to combustor design and performance in applications ranging from aeronautical to power generation. Topics include the history and evolution of gas turbine engines, thermodynamic cycles, conventional and alternative aviation fuels, combustion fundamentals, fuel injection and atomization, advanced wall cooling techniques, mechanisms of combustion noise and approaches to noise control, and design and performance for ultra-low emissions. Prereq. (a) ME 4570 and junior or senior standing or (b) graduate standing; engineering students only.

ME 5695. Aerodynamics. 4 Hours.

Focuses on topics of practical importance in applications of fluid mechanics to external flows over bodies. Covers compressible flow analysis in order to use the concepts of sound speed and Mach number and to design subsonic and supersonic nozzles, diffusers, and airfoils. Introduces normal and oblique shock waves and the Prandtl-Meyer expansion applied to supersonic flows over bodies and surfaces. Discusses Rayleigh and Fanno flows. Studies and applies the Bernoulli equation and potential flow theory to external flow analyses and the theory of lift generation on airfoils. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

ME 5976. Directed Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers theoretical or experimental work under the direction of members of the department on a chosen topic. Course content depends on instructor. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

ME 5978. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers theoretical or experimental work under individual faculty supervision. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

ME 5984. Research. 1-4 Hours.

Offers an opportunity to conduct research under faculty supervision. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

ME 6200. Mathematical Methods for Mechanical Engineers 1. 4 Hours.

Focuses on ordinary differential equations (ODEs) with mechanical engineering applications, linear algebra, and vector analysis. Topics include Laplace transform, power series, Fourier series, numerical methods for ODEs, matrices, finite dimensional linear vector spaces, eigenvalue problems, applications to systems of ODEs, vector field theory, curvilinear coordinates, and integral theorems. Prereq. Engineering students only.

ME 6201. Mathematical Methods for Mechanical Engineers 2. 4 Hours.

Focuses on partial differential equations with applications to mechanical engineering. Includes function spaces; Sturm-Liouville theory; eigenfunction expansions; special functions; potential theory; solution of elliptic, parabolic, and hyperbolic PDEs using separation of variables; eigenfunction expansions, transform methods, and numerical methods. Prereq. ME 6200.

ME 6260. Introduction to Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS). 4 Hours.

Provides an introduction to microelectromechanical systems including principles of sensing and actuation, microfabrication technology for MEMS, noise concepts, and packaging techniques. Covers a wide range of disciplines, from electronics to mechanics, material properties, microfabrication technology, electromagnetics, and optics. Studies several classes of devices including inertial measurement devices, pressure sensors, rf components, and optical MEMS. Devotes the last third of the semester largely to design projects, involving design of MEMS devices to specifications in a realistic fabrication process. Prereq. Engineering students only.

ME 6962. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

ME 6964. Co-op Work Experience. 0 Hours.

Provides eligible students with an opportunity for work experience. Prereq. ENCP 6000.

ME 6965. Co-op Work Experience Abroad. 0 Hours.

Offers eligible students an opportunity for work experience abroad. Prereq. Engineering students only.

ME 7200. Boundary-Integral Methods in Engineering. 4 Hours.

Introduces boundary-integral equation methods for solving problems in solid mechanics, fluid mechanics, and electromagnetism. Begins with fundamentals such as the exact correspondence between partial-differential equation models and boundary-integral equations and the use of Green’s functions and Green’s theorem to convert between them. Illustrates boundary-integral theory and computation through applications including materials, nanotechnology, and biological systems. Offers students hands-on experience with state-of-the-art software and high-performance computing strategies, such as coupling boundary-integrals to traditional finite-element methods. Prereq. ME 6201.

ME 7205. Advanced Mathematical Methods for Mechanical Engineers. 4 Hours.

Covers applications to applied mechanics and thermal science problems in advanced engineering applications. Topics may include complex variables, analytic functions, Laurent and Taylor series, singularities, branch points, and contour integration. Additional topics may include generalized functions and integral transforms; variational calculus and applications; and approximate methods of engineering analysis, including asymptotic expansions, perturbation methods, and weighted residual methods. Prereq. ME 6200; engineering students only.

ME 7210. Elasticity and Plasticity. 4 Hours.

Covers stress and strain analysis in continuous media. Analyzes Cartesian tensors using indicial notation; stress and strain concepts; point stress and strain; relation to tensor concepts; equations of equilibrium and compatibility; constitutive laws for elastic, general, axisymmetric, plane stress, and plane strain formulations and solutions; the relation of elasticity to structural mechanics theories; physical basis of plastic/inelastic deformation of solids; and constitutive descriptions of plasticity including yielding, hardening rules, Prandtl-Reuss constitutive laws, and viscoplasticity. Prereq. Engineering students only.

ME 7220. Mechanics of Contact and Lubrication. 4 Hours.

Covers issues related to friction, wear, and lubrication of contacting surfaces. Topics include brief review of elasticity, fluid mechanics and probability theory, characterization of engineering surfaces, standard surface topography descriptors, Gaussian and fractal characterization of surface topography, surface profilers, contact mechanics, Hertzian contact, contact of rough surfaces, real area of contact, empirical contact formulas, rolling contact, friction of solids, wear mechanisms, theory of lubrication, compressible and incompressible Reynolds equation, effects of slip flow, classification of bearing types, elastohydrodynamic lubrication, foil bearings, and boundary lubrication. Prereq. ME 7210.

ME 7232. Theory of Plates and Shells. 4 Hours.

Covers the mechanics of plates using classical theory (cylindrical bending, rectangular plates, and circular plates) and plate theory with shear deformation. Includes combined effects of bending and in-plane forces, buckling of plates, moderately large deflections, membrane theory of shells, analysis of thin cylindrical shells of revolution, and general theory of thin elastic shells. Prereq. (a) ME 6200 or (b) ME 6200 and ME 6201.

ME 7238. Advanced Finite Element Method. 4 Hours.

Focuses on advanced techniques for solving engineering problems with the finite element method. Topics include review of finite element method; solution of linear and nonlinear algebraic problems; solution of dynamics problems; solution of contact problems using penalty and Lagrange multiplier methods; solution of nonlinear beams, plates, and shells; finite element formulations of solid continua including Lagrangian and updated Lagrangian formulations, material nonlinearities, and use of a commercially available finite element package. Prereq. ME 5657 and ME 7210.

ME 7240. Composite Materials. 4 Hours.

Discusses the stress, strain and deformation, and failure analysis of composite structures. Topics include introduction to composite materials, constitutive relations and mechanical properties of particulate reinforced composites, anisotropic lamina and cellular composites, micromechanical models, laminated composites and effect of stacking sequence, application to structural response of beams and plates, and damage in composite materials. Prereq. ME 7210.

ME 7245. Fracture Mechanics and Failure Analysis. 4 Hours.

Explores the fundamentals of fracture and failure of materials. Includes Orwan and Griffith theory of fracture, energy release rate and stress intensity factor as fracture parameters, fracture toughness and its determination, crack growth resistance, R curve, crack opening displacement, J integral methodology, prediction of fatigue crack growth using fracture mechanics, test for measurement of fatigue crack growth parameters, optical fractography in failure analysis, overview of nonlinear fracture mechanics, probabilistic method for fracture prediction for ceramic materials with random populations of microscopic flaws, and application of fracture mechanics in failure analysis. Prereq. ME 7210.

ME 7247. Advanced Control Engineering. 4 Hours.

Reviews topics from modern control engineering and characteristics of nonlinear systems. Covers fundamentals of Lyapunov theory and stability analysis as well as nonlinear feedback control systems using the Lyapunov method. Includes an introduction to advanced topics: variable structure system control, adaptive control-system analysis and design, robust adaptive control, and optimal and digital control. Prereq. ME 5659 or a graduate-level course in modern control; engineering students only.

ME 7253. Advanced Vibrations. 4 Hours.

Covers advanced concepts in mechanical vibration analysis. Topics include introduction to variational approach and energy methods applied to motions of deformable body in three dimensions; vibrations of distributed-parameters systems including strings, bars, shafts, beams, membranes, and plates. Covers approximate methods, Rayleigh’s Quotient, Rayleigh-Ritz method, method of functions expansion, Galerkin’s and assumed mode methods, design and analysis of a variety of vibration-control systems, and recent advances in vibration of micro- and nanoscale systems. Prereq. ME 5655 or permission of instructor; engineering students only.

ME 7255. Continuum Mechanics. 4 Hours.

Covers the stresses, strains, and displacements in general continuous media. Topics include vector and tensor calculus; definitions of stress, strain, and deformation; kinematics of a continuous medium; material derivatives; rate of deformation tensor, finite strain, and deformation; Eulerian and Lagrangian formulations; geometric measures of strain; relative deformation gradient, rotation, and stretch tensors; compatibility conditions; general principles; conservation of mass; momentum principles; energy balance; and principle of virtual displacements. Prereq. ME 7210.

ME 7262. Nanomanufacturing 1. 4 Hours.

Provides an interdisciplinary nanomanufacturing course for a student population with diverse scientific and engineering backgrounds. Taught in segments focused in five areas: (1) directed sef-assembly, (2) advanced micro- and nanofabrication techniques, (3) nanoscale polymer and composite processing, (4) environmentally benign nanomanufacturing and worker safety, and (5) related policy and ethical issues. Includes fundamental concepts in addition to more advanced topics in nanomanufacturing in each lecture segment.

ME 7270. General Thermodynamics. 4 Hours.

Examines fundamentals of equilibrium thermodynamics. Topics include work, energy, heat, temperature, available energy, entropy, first and second law of thermodynamics, simple systems, closed and open systems, availability loss and irreversibility, heat engines, multicomponent systems, mixtures of gases, chemical reactions, and chemical equilibrium. Prereq. Engineering students only.

ME 7275. Essentials of Fluid Dynamics. 4 Hours.

Offers a fundamental course in fluid dynamics designed to prepare the student for more advanced courses in the thermofluids curriculum while providing a strong background in fluid mechanics. Topics include Cartesian tensors; differential and integral formulation of the equations of conservation of mass, momentum, and energy; molecular and continuum transport phenomena; the Navier-Stokes equations; vorticity; inviscid incompressible flow, the velocity potential, and Bernoulli‘s equation; viscous incompressible flow; the stream function; some exact solutions; energy equation including heat conduction and viscous dissipation, low Reynolds number flow, exact and approximate approaches to laminar boundary layers in high Reynolds number flows, stability of laminar flows and the transition to turbulence, and treatment of incompressible turbulent mean flow; and internal and external flows. Prereq. ME 6200; engineering students only.

ME 7280. Statistical Thermodynamics. 4 Hours.

Provides insight into the laws of classical thermodynamics and the behavior of substances. Topics include introduction to probability; ensemble theory, elementary kinetic theory of an ideal gas including the distribution of molecular velocities, and the mean free path treatment of transport properties; classical statistics of independent particles, equipartition of energy, the partition function, and laws of thermodynamics; some results from quantum mechanics, quantum statistics of independent particles; applications to gases; and systems of interacting particles. Prereq. ME 6200 and ME 7270.

ME 7285. Heat Conduction and Thermal Radiation. 4 Hours.

Emphasizes analytical techniques in conduction and radiative transfer. Topics include formulation of steady- and unsteady-state one-dimensional and multidimensional heat conduction problems, solution techniques for linear problems including the method of separation of variables, Laplace transforms and integral transforms, approximate analytical methods, phase change problems, and nonlinear problems. Offers an introduction to thermal radiation heat transfer including the electromagnetic background of radiation, nature of thermal radiation, radiation intensity, black body intensity, and radiation through nonparticipating media. Discusses the fundamentals of radiation in absorbing, emitting, and scattering media including the equation of radiative transfer with methods of solution, pure radiative transfer in participating media, and interaction of radiation with conduction and/or convection. Prereq. ME 6200 and undergraduate heat transfer.

ME 7290. Convective Heat Transfer. 4 Hours.

Focuses on the fundamental equations of convective heat transfer including heat transfer in incompressible external laminar boundary layers, integral boundary layer equations, laminar forced convection in internal flows, and turbulent forced convection in internal and external flows. Develops analogies between heat and momentum transfer including the Reynolds, Taylor, and Martinelli analogies. Covers natural convection, heat transfer in high-speed flow, and transient forced convection. Prereq. ME 7275.

ME 7295. Multiscale Flow and Transport Phenomena. 4 Hours.

Covers the fundamentals of flow and transport phenomena in multiscale systems. Begins with an overview of momentum, energy, and mass transport phenomena, emphasizing microscale phenomena such as the slip flow regime. Introduces other driving forces and transport processes relevant to microscale flows, such as surface tension (capillarity) and electrokinetics. These basic concepts provide the preamble for the presentation of the more complex multiphase and porous flow transport behavior. This course material is supplemented with class projects and presentations by the students. Prereq. Knowledge of thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, and heat transfer; engineering students only.

ME 7300. Combustion and Air Pollution. 4 Hours.

Deals with the formation of pollutants during combustion processes and their subsequent transformations in the atmosphere. Emphasis is on the effects of design and operating parameters of combustion devices on the nature and composition of exhaust gases, improvements, postcombustion treatment of effluent gases, atmospheric chemistry, and atmospheric transport of pollutants, smog formation, acid rain, ozone formation, and destruction.

ME 7305. Fundamentals of Combustion. 4 Hours.

Provides an advanced course that is a comprehensive treatment of the problems involved in the combustion of liquid, gaseous, and solid fuels in both laminar and turbulent flow. Discusses the fundamentals of chemical kinetics. Examines the equations for the transport of mass, momentum, and energy with chemically reacting gases. Topics include diffusion and premixed flames, combustion of droplets and sprays, and gasification and combustion of coal. Prereq. ME 7270.

ME 7310. Computational Fluid Dynamics with Heat Transfer. 4 Hours.

Offers an advanced course in numerical methods applied to fluid flows with heat transfer. Topics include finite difference and finite volume methods for solving partial differential equations, with particular emphasis on the equations of fluid dynamics and heat transfer. Other topics include mathematical properties of partial differential equations, accuracy and stability analysis of numerical solutions, applications to a variety of fluid dynamics and heat transfer problems, grid generation, and an introduction to turbulence modeling. Prereq. ME 7275 and knowledge of computer programming; engineering students only.

ME 7315. Heat Transfer Processes in Microelectronic Devices. 4 Hours.

Focuses on discussion and development of state-of-the-art methods used to predict the heat transfer rates from microelectronic devices and packages and to simulate transport phenomena in manufacturing processes associated with microelectronic devices. Topics may include use of latent heat reservoirs, boiling jet impingement cooling, control volume approaches to extended surfaces, calculation of thermal contact conductances, and natural convection in enclosures. Prereq. ME 6200.

ME 7325. Two Phase Flow. 4 Hours.

Covers the basic concepts of heat and mass transfer associated with phase change and multiphase flows. Topics include boiling heat transfer (nucleate boiling, film boiling, and bubble dynamics); evaporation and condensation; liquid-gas two-phase flow and gas-solid and liquid-solid two-phase flows. Prereq. ME 6200 and knowledge of heat transfer.

ME 7330. Turbulent Flow. 4 Hours.

Offers an advanced course dealing with flow and transport, with emphasis on engineering methods. Includes generation and dissipation of turbulence, fluctuations, and time-averaging; Reynolds stresses and turbulent fluxes; closure models for free and bounded shear flows; models employed for practical flows including k-epsilon and algebraic-stress models; an introduction to large eddy and direct simulation; and an introduction to numerical modeling of turbulent flows. Prereq. ME 7275.

ME 7335. Aerosol Mechanics. 4 Hours.

Studies the behavior of ultrafine particles from both microscopic and macroscopic viewpoints. Discusses the microscopic origins of aerosol transport phenomena including Bownian diffusion, drag, thermophoresis, condensation, and evaporation. Explores deposition processes for monodisperse aerosols, the distribution function for polydisperse aerosols, the general dynamic equation and methods of solution, homogeneous nucleation, and coagulation. Applications are introduced where appropriate. Prereq. ME 7285 and ME 7290.

ME 7340. Turbomachinery Design. 4 Hours.

Presents preliminary design methods and analytical tools applicable to turbomachinery. Discusses design criteria and performance characteristics at design and off-design operating conditions for several important types of turbomachinery. Studies axial flow compressors and turbines (gas and steam) including topics such as compressor surge, turbine blade cooling, and steam wetness effects. Also studies centrifugal compressors, radial inflow turbine, pumps, fans, and water turbines. Discusses turbomachinery mechanical design limitations. Examines the use of empirical data on blade cascade performance in blade selection. Presents numerical methods of analyzing two- and three-dimensional flows in turbomachinery (conformal transformation and streamline curvature). Two in-depth design projects are assigned. Prereq. Knowledge of fluid mechanics and thermodynamics; engineering students only.

ME 7350. Graduate Seminar in Robotics. 1 Hour.

Introduces the field of robotics with an emphasis on medical applications. Consists of lectures from experts in the field of robotics, discussions of the latest papers in robotics literature, and student presentations of minirobotics projects. Prereq. Engineering students only.

ME 7355. Graduate Seminar in Nanoscale Manufacturing. 1 Hour.

Introduces the new field of nanomanufacturing. Covers applications in energy, life sciences, electronics, and materials. Consists of lectures from experts in the field of nanomanufacturing on the latest developments in nanotechnology and nanotechnology-based products and presentations in nanomanufacturing topics chosen and presented by students.

ME 7374. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering. 4 Hours.

Offers topics of interest to the staff member conducting this class for advanced study.

ME 7440. Mechanical Engineering Leadership Challenge Project 1. 4 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to develop and present a plan for the demonstration of a marketable technology product or prototype with a mechanical engineering focus. Constitutes the first half of a thesis-scale project in technology commercialization. Requires work/training with a sponsoring organization or employer to improve a process or develop a project that is of significant value to the organization and demonstrates a quantifiable market impact while enhancing the student’s technological and engineering depth and fostering the student’s leadership development. Prereq. Restricted to engineering leadership students in the following majors: computer systems engineering, engineering management, industrial engineering, interdisciplinary engineering, mechanical engineering, and operations research.

ME 7442. Mechanical Engineering Leadership Challenge Project 2. 4 Hours.

Continues ME 7440, a thesis-scale project in technology commercialization. Offers students an opportunity to demonstrate their development of a marketable technology product or prototype with a mechanical engineering focus and to produce a written documentary report on the project to the satisfaction of an advising committee. Requires work/training with a sponsoring organization or employer to improve a process or develop a project that is of significant value to the organization and demonstrates a quantifiable market impact while enhancing the student’s technological and engineering depth and fostering the student’s leadership development. Prereq. ME 7440; restricted to engineering leadership students in the following majors: computer systems engineering, engineering management, industrial engineering, interdisciplinary engineering, mechanical engineering, and operations research.

ME 7945. Master’s Project. 4 Hours.

Offers theoretical or experimental work under individual faculty supervision. Prereq. Engineering students only.

ME 7962. Elective. 1-4 Hours.

Offers elective credit for courses taken at other academic institutions.

ME 7978. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Offers theoretical or experimental work under individual faculty supervision. An independent study must be petitioned and approved by the academic advisor. The petition must clearly state the reason for taking the course; a brief description of goals; as well as the expected outcomes, deliverables, and grading scheme. Master’s degree students in thesis or project options are not eligible to take independent study.

ME 7990. Thesis. 1-8 Hours.

Offers analytical and/or experimental work conducted under the direction of the faculty in fulfillment of the requirements for the degree. Requires first-year students to attend a graduate seminar program that introduces the students to the methods of choosing a research topic, conducting research, and preparing a thesis. Requires successful completion of the seminar program.

ME 7994. Thesis Continuation—Part Time. 0 Hours.

Continues thesis work conducted under the supervision of a departmental faculty member.

ME 7996. Thesis Continuation. 0 Hours.

Continues thesis work conducted under the supervision of a departmental faculty member.

ME 8960. Candidacy Preparation—Doctoral. 0 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to prepare for the PhD qualifying exam under faculty supervision. Prereq. Intended for students who have completed all required PhD course work and have not yet achieved PhD candidacy; students who have not completed all required PhD course work are not allowed to register for this course.

ME 8964. Co-op Work Experience. 0 Hours.

Provides eligible students with an opportunity for work experience.

ME 8986. Research. 0 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to conduct full-time research under faculty supervision.

ME 9000. PhD Candidacy Achieved. 0 Hours.

Indicates successful completion of program requirements for PhD candidacy.

ME 9986. Research. 0 Hours.

Offers students an opportunity to conduct full-time research under faculty supervision.

ME 9990. Dissertation. 0 Hours.

Offers dissertation supervision under individual faculty supervision. May be taken twice for course credit. Prereq. PhD candidacy in mechanical engineering.

ME 9996. Dissertation Continuation. 0 Hours.

Offers continuing dissertation supervision under individual faculty supervision. Prereq. ME 9990 completed twice; mechanical engineering students only.